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Thread: What shift pattern does a MotoGP bike have?

  1. #1
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    What shift pattern does a MotoGP bike have?

    I watched the Sepang tests on MotoGP.com and I saw Marc Marquez get on his bike in the garage and he pressed the gear lever down and took off. This leads me to the following observations:

    1) He doesn't have the reversed pattern commonly know as GP shift pattern.
    2) He does have the GP shift pattern but neutral is at the top.
    3) He has GP shift but takes off in 2nd gear.

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
    apriliaforum expert plocky's Avatar
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    Had me intrigued too & I found this.

    MotoGP gearbox shift pattern

    seamless gearbox


    N 1 2 3 4 5 6


    to add : you can't go 6-5-4-3-2-1-and back into N either without holding a neutral button/lever.

    EDIT: this article confirms that, https://www.crash.net/motogp/feature...factory-yamaha
    Last edited by plocky; 02-10-2019 at 08:21 PM.
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    apriliaforum expert Zephyr's Avatar
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    Cool. Just like what we drove as kids! (minus the top three gears)

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    apriliaforum expert photoRotor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zephyr View Post
    Cool. Just like what we drove as kids! (minus the top three gears)
    ...and a mere 170mph
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    I remember that some of the riders prefer the "road" pattern, Biaggi and Vermeulen come to mind.
    Most use the "down for up" pattern.
    Though on the newest seamless boxes donīt seem to have the neutral between 1-2 but is as described on a post above, N-1-2-3-4-5-6

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    Having neutral between two gears introduces the chance of hitting it when shifting between the two gears. It also means that shift is longer than it needs to be. So it makes sense to move neutral.
    But in either case it is rider preference for which way is an up shift and which way is a down shift. Not all riders use down for up. Although I don't understand why. It seems like a much better set up to me. I really believe the only reason most bikes nowadays use up for up is to make it easier to remember.

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    What I find most logical explanation is that when you are slowing down the bike is normally upright so it is safer to shove your toes under the lever to shift to a smaller gear,
    whereas accelerating on a high-speed left hander pushing down for up is safer option than having your toes under the lever pushing up.
    Also on a high-speed right hander it is easier to push down for up as you are hanging on the "off" side of the bike, if you get my drift.

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    apriliaforum expert craigo298er's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlliW View Post
    What I find most logical explanation is that when you are slowing down the bike is normally upright so it is safer to shove your toes under the lever to shift to a smaller gear,
    whereas accelerating on a high-speed left hander pushing down for up is safer option than having your toes under the lever pushing up.
    Also on a high-speed right hander it is easier to push down for up as you are hanging on the "off" side of the bike, if you get my drift.
    Well hopefully the TC kicks in so you don’t drift too far, if you know what I mean

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlliW View Post
    What I find most logical explanation is that when you are slowing down the bike is normally upright so it is safer to shove your toes under the lever to shift to a smaller gear,
    whereas accelerating on a high-speed left hander pushing down for up is safer option than having your toes under the lever pushing up.
    Also on a high-speed right hander it is easier to push down for up as you are hanging on the "off" side of the bike, if you get my drift.
    That is my experience as well. Plus, typically you can shift by pushing down faster than you can shift by pulling the lever up with your foot. It is just easier and faster to push the lever down with your foot. So pushing down on the lever means faster shifts. I think it is more common a situation where how quickly you can shift will be of a greater benefit when you are accelerating and up shifting than when you are decelerating and down shifting. In other words, faster up shifts will improve lap times more so than faster down shifts will.

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    apriliaforum expert Triple J's Avatar
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    The couple guys I know that prefer standard shift in racing feel that way because it is easier for them to downshift heading into a corner (when there's more stuff going on in general) by just stepping down on the lever instead of lifting up. I prefer GP shift as well, but I get this argument - especially near the end of a 60+ minute stint during an endurance race when I'm getting tired! You still have to upshift of course, but they're spread out more than downshifting several gears under hard braking entering a corner, and are usually taking place at a more relaxed time on the track.
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    Quote Originally Posted by plocky View Post
    Had me intrigued too & I found this.

    MotoGP gearbox shift pattern

    seamless gearbox


    N 1 2 3 4 5 6


    to add : you can't go 6-5-4-3-2-1-and back into N either without holding a neutral button/lever.

    EDIT: this article confirms that, https://www.crash.net/motogp/feature...factory-yamaha
    Thanks, that clears things up. One of my old 2 stroke Kawasakis had neutral at the bottom, I can't remember which one, but no safety lockout. It did cause me grief on a number of occasions.

    Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cosmik de Bris View Post
    Thanks, that clears things up. One of my old 2 stroke Kawasakis had neutral at the bottom, I can't remember which one, but no safety lockout. It did cause me grief on a number of occasions.

    Cheers
    H1. 500cc Mach 3 2t triple had neutral at the bottom. Well, mine did...
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    apriliaforum expert yzr750's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kermit View Post
    H1. 500cc Mach 3 2t triple had neutral at the bottom. Well, mine did...
    Yeah, was a bit scary.....
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    My old Norton had neutrals everywhere....

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    apriliaforum expert MadDaddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YVRFACTORY View Post
    My old Norton had neutrals everywhere....
    Damn, beer through the nose on that one!
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