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Thread: Shiver chain and sprocket replacement

  1. #1
    apriliaforum expert MARTCO78's Avatar
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    Shiver chain and sprocket replacement

    Part 1

    This is a job that's been waiting to be done. The OE chain and sprockets had reached the end of their useful life at about 16,000 miles of all-weather UK riding.
    You can tell it's time when you can pull the chain away from the back of the rear sprocket by 5-10mm, or the fact you have to adjust the chain every other week and you're running out of adjustment!

    First thing to do is remove the clutch slave cylinder/sprocket cover to enable the gearbox sprocket nut to be loosened off whilst the old chain is still in place. This is covered by HMarc's excellent piece here: http://www.apriliaforum.com/forums/s...procket+change

    The only thing I did differently was to remove the hyrdraulic line completely from the clutch slave cylinder and let it drain as I wanted to renew the fluid.

    I used for the first time a magnetic parts dish. These are really good as I do all my work out in the open air and it not only helps to keep all the bits safely in one place, but also allows you to arrange different fixings in the pattern they were removed.

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    As you can see it was pretty grimey in there from a couple of year's road debris and chain oil.
    The central sprocket nut can be slackened off with the bike in gear.
    I also discovered as an aside that the 3 bolts holding the side-stand mounting plate to the engine were loose enough to allow it to move so it's probably worth a check whilst your'e in the area.

    Next step is to split the chain. I recently bought a chain splitter and riveter on eBay which proved to be fine for the job:http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/4006032009...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
    I picked link on the chain in the middle of the lower run and attached the correct sized pin in the splitter which when tightened simply forces the rivet through a hole in the back side of the splitter. You have to apply a fair amount of force, but it's easier if you use a long-handled spanner on the fine-pitched inner pin shaft.

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    With the chain now pulled away you can undo the gearbox sprocket nut and remove it. Above shows old and new together and the old shows the classic hooked tooth features of a very worn sprocket. (Note both of these are non-Aprillia 15-tooth aftermarket sprockets which may not be of the same quality as OEM)

    Fix the new sprocket and tighten it up as much as you can with the engine in gear, but leave the final torquing until after the chain is fitted.

    Next remove the rear wheel. I found that once the axle was withdrawn the wheel could be rolled back sufficently to allow work on the sprocket without having to remove the rear caliper.
    The rear sprocket has attached to it the sprocket carrier which, via 5 pegs, slots into the five rubber inserts in the rear wheel hub. It's worth taking a spanner to each of the 5 exposed lock-nuts and turning them a little as this rotates the pegs in the rubber and releases any 'grip' they may have. The old sprocket and carrier should just simply pull out from the wheel.

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    The spocket can be released from the carrier by inserting a hex-drive in the bottom of each peg and undoing the lock-nuts. With the new sprocket attached the sprocket and carrier can be pushed back onto the wheel.

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    The rear sprocket was not as severely worn as the front, but one should always replace chain and sprockets as a set.


  2. #2
    apriliaforum expert MARTCO78's Avatar
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    Part 2

    The rear wheel can now be put back in place, but before doing so slacken the chain adjusters right off so that the wheel can be positioned at it's closest point to the engine.

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    The new chain can be threaded through by setting the end of the chain on the top of the rear sprocket and rotating the wheel towards the engine whilst guiding the end of the chain along it's path.
    You should end up with the two ends of the chain in the middle of the lower run with plenty of slack to allow the 'soft link' to connect the two ends.

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    Fit two of the supplied o-rings to the link and connect the chain so that the hollow rivet ends are towards you. Add the other two o-rings to the pivot ends and then the side plate. This will not go on without some pressure, so you have to use the splitter tool with the right parts added to press the plate on (middle picture above). After that change the parts on the splitter and change it's position to fit over each of the soft rivets in turn (right hand picture above). The splitter has a round pressure tool which splays the ends of the hollow rivets enough to make the whole link secure.

    After that, adjust the chain to give the right amount of slack on the lower run and check everything is rotating smoothly. Put the bike in gear and torque up the gearbox sprocket. Double check that all fixings are as they should be.
    Clean and replace the clutch slave/sprocket cover and making sure not to trap wiring and check the clutch it actuating correctly.

    Oil the chain with your prefered product and ride.

    I usually check the tension again after 100 miles just to take up any initial bedding-in slack. I'm not sure if 'running in' is a neccessity, but with any moving metal parts that mesh with each other, it can't do any harm.

    Including replacing the clutch fluid the whole job took me about 5 hours at a leisurly pace, but that included the odd stop for short showers (damn, I need a workshop!)

    Hope this will be useful for those wishing to take their bike relationship to another level and save money at the same time . Happy spannering
    Last edited by MARTCO78; 09-21-2014 at 10:25 AM.


  3. #3
    apriliaforum expert DesertGoon's Avatar
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    very good info.
    Check out https://www.youtube.com/user/MrDesertGoon/videos
    In my garage:
    2015 F32 420i Sport
    2011 RS125
    2009 Shiver 'Factory APRC'
    2008 Cagiva Mito 125

  4. #4
    apriliaforum expert tubad56's Avatar
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    Nicely done Martco
    2010 Factory DD that I want to make FACTORY Factory
    Shes there ... stands at 22.96kg shed.

  5. #5
    apriliaforum expert Frodo's Avatar
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    Excellent write-up with great photos!
    What chain did you use?
    Only thing I might add is when riveting the joining link to get a balance between secure riveting not binding the link. Interested in tips how to get this right.
    Frodo
    2015 Shiver
    New Zealand

  6. #6
    apriliaforum expert MARTCO78's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frodo View Post
    What chain did you use?
    Only thing I might add is when riveting the joining link to get a balance between secure riveting not binding the link. Interested in tips how to get this right.
    A DID chain came with the kit. I generally seem to end up with DID chains as they are readily available here at a huge variety of prices..... they are often sold as premium chains, but if you dig you can usually find them at good prices as part of a kit.

    I always find the side plate a very tight fit and almost get the impression that it would probably stay put without even expanding the rivets (don't try it). As a result I never really go at the soft links too hard to avoid binding the link. Having said that, minor binding is hardly going to be an issue with 90-odd horses and the associated torque going through it at full chat, so I don't lose any sleep.
    So sorry, no tips.... I just do it enough that it feels 'right'. Guess it's the thing that comes with age and experience, like never using a torque wrench
    Last edited by MARTCO78; 09-22-2014 at 03:21 AM.


  7. #7
    apriliaforum expert maddad's Avatar
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    I used a split link Frodo ,never had one come off yet.Nice work all the same.

  8. #8
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    Great write-up - clear photos and precise instructions. Should be part of eveyone's how-to collection.

  9. #9
    apriliaforum expert Frodo's Avatar
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    Hi Maddad
    I used to use split links but stopped when "virtual friends" had them come off (sometimes with dramatic consequences). This was on dual sport bikes where the risk of something catching the chain is greater. I find the riveter easy to use.
    Cheers
    Frodo
    2015 Shiver
    New Zealand

  10. #10
    apriliaforum expert maddad's Avatar
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    I keep an eye on it that was the only link it came with.

  11. #11
    apriliaforum expert MARTCO78's Avatar
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    I always used to use split links (without issue) because that was the accepted and only available method. These days chains always come supplied with rivet links and I haven't seen a split link on heavier chains here in a long time. Euro-legislation perhaps?
    Last edited by MARTCO78; 09-22-2014 at 06:24 AM.


  12. #12
    apriliaforum expert MARTCO78's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldbloke View Post
    Great write-up - clear photos and precise instructions. Should be part of eveyone's how-to collection.
    PDF versions here for the record if you (like me) struggle with spending too much time searching back through posts history:

    Chain and sprockets change:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/4jejtg587x...ement.pdf?dl=0

    Plus a copy of HMarc's 15T sprocket change instructions:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/cp0dsk9mfy...hange.pdf?dl=0
    Last edited by MARTCO78; 09-22-2014 at 06:24 AM.


  13. #13
    apriliaforum expert shekel's Avatar
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    Lovely work Marty. Glad I dropped in to see what some of my old mates have been up to. I haven't personally done the change sprocket and chain thing since my old dirt-bike days, and as I'm on my third shaftie, I'll probably not re-visit the experience anytime soon.
    Gil
    'Its only rock n roll but I like it....'

  14. #14
    apriliaforum expert MARTCO78's Avatar
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    Hi Shek. Yes, it seems all a little archaic these days...shaft or at least belts must be the way forward for the future. Getting bored with the constant maintenance, so a shaftie might be next on my list.
    Is the Griso still ticking the boxes?


  15. #15
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    Archaic it might be, but I certainly hope that the good old chain will be around for a long time. It's simple, inexpensive and leaves you with gearing flexibility. None of this applies to shaft or belt and they need to be maintained as well. Ask the BMW guys about it ...

    The quick 10 mins regular maintenance is really not that bad ....

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