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Thread: Tips on lubing the chain without a center stand or paddock?

  1. #16
    apriliaforum expert
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    Why don't you instal a scottoiler - It drip feeds lube in a controlled manner and saves you the hassle.

  2. #17
    apriliaforum Member Cryowatt's Avatar
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    Pull the jack out of a car. Place the jack underneath the engine. Place some wood between the jack and the bike. Raise the jack slowly until it lifts the rear wheel off the ground. If you jack it at about the same point as where the center stand mounts are, then the bike should lean forward naturally.

    This is what I did when installing the frame sliders on my Mana, with the intention of removing the load on the bolt that holds the frame on the engine. However I didn't lift it very far, so I might just be crazy.

  3. #18
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    I am SO glad I found this thread. I've had my Mana for a month and was questioning how to lube the chain. I'm going to use the "push and lube" method and also look into the cost of getting a centre stand fitted.

  4. #19
    apriliaforum expert pete roper's Avatar
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    Helen, there are numerous cunning and in some cases downright odd strategies for oiling the chain but the best thing to do is ask why it needs any lubrication at all?

    A chain has various parts but at the end of the day the important bits are the rollers, the pins and the plates.

    The rollers are the bits that go into the sprocket teeth but they also have the pins they swivel on as the chain circumnavigated the sprockets going through them. The whole lot is held together by the side plates which should be self explanatory.

    In days of yore when I had interesting things like hair and abs you had to keep flinging copious amounts of oily stuff at the chain in the hope that some of it would get in between the rollers and pins and stop them wearing out and falling to bits. For at least the last third of my life though chains have had o-rings between the side plates and the chain has been assembled with grease that the o-rings keep in so wear has been greatly minimised. Yes, it will eventually leak out or the o-rings will fail allowing the grease out and water in and at that point it will all go downhill rapidly but modern chain maintenance is actually piss-easy.

    With the engine OFF wipe the chain with a rag soaked in kerosene, (Probably Paraffin to you.) to remove grit and dirt. As stated above roll the bike forward or back to enable you to access the whole chain.

    After you have the crap off grab your can of Lithium Grease in spray form or the expensive alternative 'Motorbike Chain Lube' of your choice and spray it sparingly on the inside run of the chain, roll the bike so the whole chain can be coated.

    The object of the grease is not to lubricate the pins and rollers. That job is done by the 'Sealed In Grease' inboard of the o-rings. What you are hoping to achieve is lubrication of the o-rings so they are less likely to tear and allow the egress of the 'Sealed In' grease from the pins and rollers.

    This, along with chain tensioning maintenance, can be the difference between an unsafe 20,000Km chain and sprocket life and a 40,000 km one. My old shitter is about 1/4 of the way through its second chain and sprocket set. It's at 66,000km now. Careful maintenance pays dividends but it's not something you need to be bonkers about.....

    Pete
    Professional Goat Burster.

  5. #20
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    Trust I have not missed it in the thread above but the GT had an option of a centre stand. I don't know if this will fit a naked Mana but it is what I use on my GT.

  6. #21
    apriliaforum prov-nov azadmana's Avatar
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    How often should the chain be lubed/oiled?

  7. #22
    apriliaforum expert pete roper's Avatar
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    Depends on a host of factors, climate, usage, environment. Obviously if you live in a damp, dirty environment or ride on a lot of unsealed roads it will require more attention than if you live in a warm, clean, dry environment.

    Pete
    Professional Goat Burster.

  8. #23
    apriliaforum prov-nov azadmana's Avatar
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    Aren't the chains on the Mana sealed? At which point lubing would not really do anything all that beneficial? I have heard some people not even bother other than making sure the chains look clean... I am only city riding with an occasional highway.

    I have an 09 and I'm pretty curious to this.

  9. #24
    apriliaforum expert AndyT's Avatar
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    The Mana, like most bikes these days, has an O ring chain that is sometimes referred to as sealed. It doesn't mean you can ignore it. Like Pete, I can remember the days of lubing standard chains with all sorts of weird and wonderful methods in the hope that some of the oil or grease would actually get into the rollers. My mum was never convinced about using her cooker to heat a large tin of grease with chain coiled on top until the chain sank into the molten goo!

    The way to tell what sort of chain you have is to look at the top edge of the side plates. No gap between side plates means standard (read, old fashioned or racing*) chain, but if there is a gap you should be able to see the rubber O rings between the plates. The aim of cleaning and lubing an O ring chain is to protect the O rings and stop them getting damaged. Emphasis is on cleaning dirt and grit out from between the side plates and lubricating so the O rings can move as the side plates flex round the sprockets. Hence the need for more frequent cleaning if you ride in a dusty environment or on unsealed roads.

    There seem to be two different approaches to actually lubing the chain after cleaning. Either use something like WD40 which will penetrate into the gaps easily and is light enough so grit and dust doesn't easily stick to it. Or use a heavy wax or grease that will fill the gaps and stop the dirt getting in in the first place. I have no idea which is most efficient, but use the spray on wax system as it is often wet in the UK.

    Scot Oilers are OK, but make a mess of your rear wheel and as far as I can tell are really aimed at lubricating the rollers not the side plates.

    *Racing bikes tend to use standard chains without O rings as properly oiled and tensioned they are more efficient at transmitting power to the back wheel. But then they are changed every race along with the sprockets and the whole lot is lined up in a jig...

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