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Thread: DIY: Easy way to do the 15-tooth sprocket swap

  1. #1
    apriliaforum prov-nov HMarc's Avatar
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    DIY: Easy way to do the 15-tooth sprocket swap

    Here's a no spills, no drips, no leaks way to change the front sprocket on a Shiver. At least it worked for me!



    Here's the tools I used, you won't necessarly need all those shown in the photo above, but you will need at a minimum:

    • 8mm socket (sprocket cover)
    • 12mm socket (counter shaft sprocket bolt)
    • 32mm socket (rear axle)
    • 10mm open-end wrench (axle adjusters)
    • 13mm open-end wrench (axle adjusters)
    • 4mm Allen (clutch cylinder bolt)
    • LocTite (blue)
    • Tape measure to adjust the chain slack




    Here are the bolts you will need to losen or remove. First remove the two 8mm bolts marked by the green arrows which hold on the plastic counter-shaft sprocket. Don't try to remove the cover, just leave it loosely in place.

    Next just barely loosen the nut pointed to by the red arrow. All you want is enough looseness so you can rotate the braided clutch line out 30mm or so from where it is tucked away. It may take only 5-10 degrees of movement with the wrench. Without doing that, you can't get to the 8mm bolt behind it. See photo below.

    Next remove the two 8mm bolts shown by the upper and lower blue arrows, and the 4mm Allen bolt pointed to by the 3rd blue arrow. Leave the other two clutch cylinder bolts alone you don't need to remove them.



    Tighten the banjo bolt you just loosened after you get the clutch line moved out about this far.



    Here's why you need to do that: the 1/4" drive 8mm socket lines up exactly with the clutch hose, so you need the room. My short extension has a 15 degree "wiggle" built in, so I was able to get the bolt out without having to remove the clutch line completely.

    Note the extreme length of the 4mm Allen bolt at the bottom of the clutch cylinder. The other 4mm bolts stay in place!



    After you get all the bolts out, pull the whole assembly out as shown in the photo above. Don't pull too far, as the wire bundle my finger is on loops over the bottom left edge of the assembly and prevents it from pulling straight out.



    Next remove the black plastic cover, revealing the counter-shaft sprocket. I suggest using a small container to hold the bolts, as losing one will ruin your day. Then move the assembly out until you feel it tugging on the wire (shown by the yellow arrow in the photo below) and then move it up towards 2 O'Clock and pull it away from the bike.



    Then just let the clutch assembly hang there, it won't be in the way. The two bolts on the clutch cylinder keep the seal, so if you haven't loosened the banjo bolt too much you won't lose any fluid or introduce any air into the system.



    The yellow arrow above shows the O-ring'ed projection which fits into the hole visible in the photo below at about 8 O'Clock using the counter-shaft sprocket as a clock. The spooge is grease that got flung off the chain during break-in. I scraped most of it off, but didn't bother cleaning it as it will just be dirty again in a few hundred miles.



    I'm holding the 12mm bolt and two washers that keep the counter-shaft sprocket on. To remove it, I put the bike in 1st gear, stood on the right side of the bike with my right foot on the rear brake, then leaned over the seat and used a 6-point 12mm socket wrench to remove it. A piece of cake.



    Next I backed off the chain adjusters all the way, but with the OEM chain and rear sprocket having only 750 miles on them, there wasn't enough slack to get the chain off the front sprocket. So I put the bike on a rear stand and removed the axle. Then it was easy to slip the chain over the front sprocket teeth and remove it. It could be a really worn chain would have enough slack to avoid removing the rear axle, but if it did IMHO you need a new chain.



    Stock 16-tooth on the left, 15-tooth from AF1 on the right with spacer washer placed in position.



    Notice the odd wear pattern on the inside edge of the OEM sprocket. I saw a photo here on the forum of a much worse example (this sprocket has 750 miles on it). I'm thinking perhaps the Shiver has, or some units have, an alignment problem as delivered.



    The 'spacer' ring that came with the AF1 15-tooth sprocket to obtain the same spacing as the OEM 16-tooth sprocket.



    The sprocket retaining bolt, with two OEM washers plus the 'spacer' ring that came with the AF1 sprocket. You can see the blue LocTite I applied to the bolt.

    The reassembly is pretty much the reverse of what I described above. Don't forget to adjust the chain slack you should have about 25mm of play if you lift the bottom of the chain mid-way between the sprockets.

    When you replace the clutch assembly, if you can see that the two 8mm bolt holes (marked by the upper and lower most blue arrows in the 2nd photo on this page) are lined up, then just firmly push the assembly in until it mates solidly. The resistance is just the clutch cylinder 'giving' against the rod that runs through the engine to the clutch (which is on the other side of the engine).

    Double check to make sure all the bolts are tight. I couldn't find the torque value for the counter-shaft sprocket rataining bolt but I've stripped enough bolts in the last 50 years of motorcycle maintenance that I got it plenty tight, but not too tight. The 32mm rear axle nut takes 88 ft/lbs, or 120Nm.

    Postscript

    Of course I had to take it for a ride, and the improvement is well worth the $25 or so that the sprocket cost. It's much easier to launch from a stop (less clutch slipping required) and it just "feels" like the gear ratios are more approriate to a street bike. On the track, the OEM gearing felt fine if a wee bit tall, but I don't ride on the track but a few percent of the time.

    An excellent modification. And the gear indicator still works correctly! I'm guessing my speedo (and odometer) are now about 6% optimistic, so at 70mph indicated I'll really be doing just 65-66mph. And for every 100 miles I travel the odometer will register 106. But I may try a Speedo-Healer. The US Distributor is only a 90 minute ride from my house, so I may pay them a visit soon...

  2. #2
    apriliaforum expert bonehead's Avatar
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    Now THAT is a great how-to.
    That is exactly how I did it but I was, of course, far too lazy to make such a good job of the description.
    This should definitely go in the FAQ sticky IMO.
    Or perhaps we should split the forum up so these kinds of tech-help posts can have their own little section.
    Great job HMarc. Wish I'd had this before I tried it. I would have been much more confident.

    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.
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  3. #3
    apriliaforum Member Prilleren's Avatar
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    Nice guide!
    Done: Evotech tail tidy, Touno U-bolt, Polished downpipe, Stebel Nautilus 139dB horn, Phillips Motovision high/low beam bulbs - Akrapovic slip-ons - Akrapovic Underseat Stainless Protection Panel - Supersprox 15t front and 46t rear sprockets - DID 525 VM2 Gold chain
    DIY guide: Stebel Nautilus on a Shiver

  4. #4
    apriliaforum expert shekel's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Prilleren View Post
    Nice guide!
    Nice, nice!! That's not nice, that's fookin' fantastic. Very generous of you to share it with us

  5. #5
    apriliaforum expert
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    Great writeup man. I may just order it and do it myself now.
    '08 Aprilia Shiver (Silver)
    '01 Suzuki Intruder VL1500
    '76 Honda CB750 "Caffenized"

  6. #6
    apriliaforum Member hofkej's Avatar
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    Wow, good instruction, i think now i'am going to do this too....
    Thanks

  7. #7
    apriliaforum prov-nov HMarc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonehead View Post
    This should definitely go in the FAQ sticky IMO. Or perhaps we should split the forum up so these kinds of tech-help posts can have their own little section.
    Thanks for all the kind words, y'all.

    Bonehead, you're a Forum God, can't you make a sticky post? What I'd suggest is making a sticky thread titled "How To's" or "DIY" or something similar. I'd make it one that contains only links to other threads and can be edited and posted to only by the Forum Gods. That way the signal-to-noise ratio would be maximally high.

    Then when us newbies show up we can quickly find the links to the pages that tell us what we need to know, like getting into the diagnostic menus with the 12398 code, or doing various common modifications, etc. Search works too, of course, but you still have to wade through a lot of "close but not what I was looking for" type posts.

    A single sticky thread that was really just well-titled links (with optional short descriptions) would be very handy, I would think...

  8. #8
    apriliaforum Member
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    That is a great guide. I think I may just tackle that myself too. Thanks

    If you're ever doing a valve adjustment...

  9. #9
    apriliaforum prov-nov HMarc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by klrhelipilot View Post
    That is a great guide. I think I may just tackle that myself too. Thanks

    If you're ever doing a valve adjustment...
    I promise that when I do a valve adjustment, I'll do a similar post with photos. But that valve adjust is 11,000 miles away...


  10. #10
    apriliaforum expert PedalBin's Avatar
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    What more can i say?!

    IMO should be made sticky and should include loads more info as well.

    I take it its the same for changing a DD sprocket as well then? (don't know whether i will do it but its useful to know)
    Last edited by PedalBin; 05-15-2011 at 02:40 PM.

  11. #11
    apriliaforum Member samo's Avatar
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    fantastic mate, wish i`d seen this a couple of weeks ago, i pulled the cluch plunger of and lost the fluid,
    could not see a way of getting the plastic cover of
    still it was easy to re- bleed,,
    nice one....

    steve..

  12. #12
    apriliaforum Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by HMarc View Post
    I promise that when I do a valve adjustment, I'll do a similar post with photos. But that valve adjust is 11,000 miles away...

    ...I think you should do a valve adjustment every 3000...

  13. #13
    apriliaforum expert bonehead's Avatar
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    Like the idea Hmarc, except all the god stuff you silly billy.
    But as we are not going to get a divided forum I guess the next best is a sticky how-to thread.
    FANTASTIC IDEA.
    Perhaps we should only let you post in it
    There is quite a lot of good stuff (like the 12398 number) in the FAQ but who needs dealers if we have pictorials like that for valve adjustment and other service business.

    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.
    J. Krishnamurti
    Zeitgeist

    Never confuse who you are with what you do.
    Makka

  14. #14
    apriliaforum Member hofkej's Avatar
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    I want one, but i can only find it on AF1 site.... shipping is 40 USD =(
    Thats not an option for me, anyone located it in europe???

  15. #15
    apriliaforum expert burty's Avatar
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    15T sprockets are available from Esjot, http://www.esjot.com/uk/index.php?me...II=2461&SCIPI=

    There are various European Suppliers:

    http://cgi.ebay.de/Ritzel-Z-15-525er...3A1|240%3A1318

    Supersprox also make one, but it may be the two piece option.

    There is lots of info in this thread if you want to commit some of your life reading it.

    http://www.apriliaforum.com/forums/s...d.php?t=158631



    Ex-owner: 2007 Shiver, Aprilia screen, Tuono forks and Brembos, Hyperpro Springs F&R, 46T rear sprocket (supersprox), DNA Filter, Akrapovics, Gold wheels, Michelin Pilot Road IIs

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