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TuonoGrant
06-21-2006, 09:40 AM
Rang my local Aprilia dealer today and was quoted 100 to get the first service done?? Am I missing somthing here or is that really cheap. Maybe they are missing something from the service. What should they be doing on the first service??

I didnt buy the bike from them as they didnt have any in stock - but the dealer I purchased from in the city is an hour and a half to get there and are charging 260 - would more money mean they do more?? :confused:

splatty
06-21-2006, 10:01 AM
Cuzzy

This has been banded about a bit but here are my experiences.

I was told by my selling dealer that the first service is 240 as it includes 3-4 hours labour for a valve/shimm check. My bike was serviced in 5 hours and cost 238.

I have since started using another dealer recommended by a forum member. They charge the same for a major service but keep your bike for two days as the valve check can only be done on a bike with a stone cold engine. Hence, I reckon I was charged for something that was not done. I have argued with the selling dealer, got nowhere, and basically told them to **** off.

The dealer I use now told me not to worry as they have never found a problem on a first service, more a case of being annoyed about being ripped off.

The bottom line is that if the service is done correctly as Aprilia state, the service should be circa 250 and should take a couple of days.

I aint a mechanic, but I am going on recommendation of a dealer who seems honest and is used by somebody I know.

Hope this helps :cheers:

TuonoGrant
06-21-2006, 10:48 AM
Thanks Splatty. I double checked the prices and they were out - but only slightly. 80 plus VAT plus oil and filter costs - and this includes the valve and shim check.

JC4
06-21-2006, 12:35 PM
I'd be skeptical if they actually check the valves for that price.(not that they are likely to be out of adjustment.) The other thing I'd check on is, make sure they have a current AXONE to properly adjust the TPS, and check the other sensors...

But, if it's legit, it's a great first service price.

splatty
06-22-2006, 02:27 AM
I'd be skeptical if they actually check the valves for that price.(not that they are likely to be out of adjustment.) The other thing I'd check on is, make sure they have a current AXONE to properly adjust the TPS, and check the other sensors...

But, if it's legit, it's a great first service price.

:plus:

The dealer I use says that a lot of dealers ignore the valve check as it's too early for adjustment to be needed. He also said Aprilia have mentioned that it is not necessary at the 600 mile service, more likely at the 8k service. If you go by the maintenance recommendations though, it should be done.

But hey, if Aprilia have changed their stance, or not. You have still saved enough to insure her, or a bunch towards it.

Get it done, say thanks, and start using all the revs and power from that Rotax beast underneath you.

By the way, get the 15t front sprocket put on while they are doing the service. Only takes 15 mins and makes her much more manageable at low speed :burnout:

TUONOAPE
06-22-2006, 03:14 AM
I reckon this valve thing is a croc, aren't they shimmed? Isn't the whole point of shimmed valve adjustment to increase reliablity and minimised wear and need for adjustment? Why on earth they would need adjusting at 600miles is beyond me. I assume the engines are run up on the bench so if anythings really out it's goning to show up there, not 600 miles later.

splatty
06-22-2006, 04:43 AM
I reckon this valve thing is a croc, aren't they shimmed? Isn't the whole point of shimmed valve adjustment to increase reliablity and minimised wear and need for adjustment? Why on earth they would need adjusting at 600miles is beyond me. I assume the engines are run up on the bench so if anythings really out it's goning to show up there, not 600 miles later.

Ape, I think that you are right mate.

Trouble is people will have whatever done as they are afraid of affecting the warranty. At the end of the day if I decide to change her in a couple of years (V4 Tuono ????) having two years warranty left is a good selling point.

wormus
06-22-2006, 07:25 AM
Collin Collins in Letchworth (UK) serviced mine at 600 miles. It cost me £60, I think for just an oil change. They also fitted my exhausts, front sprocket and did the remap within the cost.

gemellato
06-22-2006, 12:44 PM
I had my first service done by Carl Harrison in Norfolk. He's a top bloke..specialises in all things Italian (bikes that is!). What this man doesn't know about bikes is not worth knowing. Because he is 90miles from me I waited whilst he serviced the bike...and that took all day ( he did have to wait for the bike to cool). Carl reckons 50% need the valves adjusted but it depends on how u run it in.

Carl charged me 187..and i know the work was done by an expert.....he's not an authorised Aprilia dealer though

cds10
06-22-2006, 01:20 PM
Carl charged me 187..and i know the work was done by an expert.....he's not an authorised Aprilia dealer though[/QUOTE]

Won't that void your 4 year warrenty though?? :confused:

gemellato
06-22-2006, 01:26 PM
cds10...gotta sign off..but promise to be back with a reply

TUONOAPE
06-23-2006, 03:33 AM
Carl reckons ...it depends on how u run it in.
Sorry, no offence to you at all gemellato, but I think that's a croc too.

T06
06-23-2006, 04:33 AM
Carl charged me 187..and i know the work was done by an expert.....he's not an authorised Aprilia dealer though

Won't that void your 4 year warrenty though?? :confused:[/QUOTE]
In a word...Yes.

gemellato
06-23-2006, 02:14 PM
well..that might be true

When I had my car serviced, i was told that due to a new E.U directive, independant garages can service vehicles still in warrenty..so long as they use o.e parts and service the car in accordance with manufacturers guidlines..and this wont effect the warrenty...so i dont see why this cant be the same for bikes...i've since read this on other bike forums...

i've taken the chance cos i didnt want to be ripped off by a sus dealer just to get my service book stamped.

Thinking about the running in business..who really knows how to best run a bike in..seems everyone has their own ideas..somw say thrash from the start and you'll gain more hp..dunno.u pays ya money and takes ya pick

TUONOAPE
06-23-2006, 05:22 PM
Thinking about the running in business..who really knows how to best run a bike in..seems everyone has their own ideas..somw say thrash from the start and you'll gain more hp..dunno.u pays ya money and takes ya pick
Talking to guys I know that sell bikes and often retrade them years later, they all say that the demo bikes end up with the stronger engines over time (and we all know how they are run in). Personally, I get on and ride it they same way I'm always going to ride it.

TuonoGrant
06-25-2006, 11:50 AM
well..that might be true

When I had my car serviced, i was told that due to a new E.U directive, independant garages can service vehicles still in warrenty..so long as they use o.e parts and service the car in accordance with manufacturers guidlines..and this wont effect the warrenty...so i dont see why this cant be the same for bikes...i've since read this on other bike forums...

i've taken the chance cos i didnt want to be ripped off by a sus dealer just to get my service book stamped.


I heard this as well. But according to the Aprilia dealers a lot of the history and warranty info is done/kept online? Wondered if this was the case - and if so how would a non-dealer have access to it? Unless its not - in which case it wont matter. Will ask when i get it serviced next week.

Themib
06-25-2006, 01:32 PM
Thinking about the running in business..who really knows how to best run a bike in..seems everyone has their own ideas..somw say thrash from the start and you'll gain more hp..dunno.u pays ya money and takes ya pick

You might find this interesting reading.

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

twin4me
06-28-2006, 05:03 AM
Just dropped mine off for the first service and the dealer asked me if I wanted the valves checked. I asked him what he thought and he said in all the bikes he's checked at the 600 mile service he hasn't had to adjust the valves yet. I asked him about the service record and warranty and he said he would sign it just like normal.

I decided that I would save the money and put it towards an Olins and a set of pipes.

splatty
06-28-2006, 05:12 AM
I asked him about the service record and warranty and he said he would sign it just like normal.

Sounds like a reputable dealer LOL

gemellato
06-28-2006, 04:30 PM
Unfortunately theres a lot of dealers out there that will stamp a service book for a drink or 2...just means any so called "full service history" should be taken with a pinch of salt (no offense to any reputable dealers!)

williamr
06-29-2006, 07:09 AM
Won't that void your 4 year warrenty though?? :confused:
In a word...Yes.[/QUOTE]
No. Under EU law the service can be carried out by any recognised dealer or mechanic. 'Recognised' in this context means VAT registered. Any parts used have to be genuine Aprilia or Aprilia approved, but otherwise Aprilia must honour the warranty.

If anyone in this position has problems, just contact TRading Standards.

Rob

gemellato
06-29-2006, 11:31 AM
thanks for confirming that williamr.

T06
06-29-2006, 08:01 PM
In a word...Yes.
No. Under EU law the service can be carried out by any recognised dealer or mechanic. 'Recognised' in this context means VAT registered. Any parts used have to be genuine Aprilia or Aprilia approved, but otherwise Aprilia must honour the warranty.

If anyone in this position has problems, just contact TRading Standards.

Rob[/QUOTE]
That's not the way I read it but maybe I've got it wrong, although you really REALLY wanna be loaded for bear when you take on the corporates
Love to see your legal costs to fight that one. Legal aid my ass.:funnypost

williamr
06-30-2006, 03:23 AM
Rob[/QUOTE]
That's not the way I read it but maybe I've got it wrong, although you really REALLY wanna be loaded for bear when you take on the corporates
Love to see your legal costs to fight that one. Legal aid my ass.:funnypost[/QUOTE]

My interpretation is correct. In the UK Trading Standards will bring a prosecution against any trader breaking this type of law. No cost to you at all. This is usually enough to resolve your problem and he gets a substantial fine as well.

Recovering your own losses is time consuming, but not expensive. In the case of a warranty dispute where liability is contested you first have to define the loss. You do this by getting the bike repaired at your expense, then suing the dealer who sold you the bike in the small claims court for the cost of the repair. You will need your mechanic to attest that he followed the service schedule and used the correct parts. He will usually be happy o do this as his business is at stake. Your contract is with the dealer, not the manufacturer. It's up to the dealer to recover his losses from the manufacturer.

An offshoot of this legislation is that the manufacturers have to make all the service information available to all dealers. My local non-franchised car repairer, for example (a specialist in Japanese sports cars) has a computer program that lets him pull up all the service information - schedules and parts - on nearly every car model sold in the UK.

Small claims court costs are in the range of about 100 - 150 for a typical warranty dispute up to about 3,000. Again, usually a small claims court summons will producethe desired result before it gets to the court. If it's contested, hearings are informal and don't require a solicitor.

The manufacturer is not even involved unless a specific case is making a really serious point and they decide to support the dealer, but the law has been in force long enough now for the legal challenges to be over and the case law established.

The issues now tend to be around dealers who are still ignorant of the law, and usually, unless you've had a major confrontation and really pissed off the dealer, a visit from a Trading Standards enforcer to explain the law, with the threat of prosecution, is enough to resolve any problems.

You just need to be persistent, don't back down and don't take any bullshit.

The law is essentially the same across the EU, although the enforcment mechanisms vary according to country. Outside the EU, I don't know the rules.

Rob

splatty
06-30-2006, 03:54 AM
Rob
That's not the way I read it but maybe I've got it wrong, although you really REALLY wanna be loaded for bear when you take on the corporates
Love to see your legal costs to fight that one. Legal aid my ass.:funnypost[/QUOTE]

My interpretation is correct. In the UK Trading Standards will bring a prosecution against any trader breaking this type of law. No cost to you at all. This is usually enough to resolve your problem and he gets a substantial fine as well.

Recovering your own losses is time consuming, but not expensive. In the case of a warranty dispute where liability is contested you first have to define the loss. You do this by getting the bike repaired at your expense, then suing the dealer who sold you the bike in the small claims court for the cost of the repair. You will need your mechanic to attest that he followed the service schedule and used the correct parts. He will usually be happy o do this as his business is at stake. Your contract is with the dealer, not the manufacturer. It's up to the dealer to recover his losses from the manufacturer.

An offshoot of this legislation is that the manufacturers have to make all the service information available to all dealers. My local non-franchised car repairer, for example (a specialist in Japanese sports cars) has a computer program that lets him pull up all the service information - schedules and parts - on nearly every car model sold in the UK.

Small claims court costs are in the range of about 100 - 150 for a typical warranty dispute up to about 3,000. Again, usually a small claims court summons will producethe desired result before it gets to the court. If it's contested, hearings are informal and don't require a solicitor.

The manufacturer is not even involved unless a specific case is making a really serious point and they decide to support the dealer, but the law has been in force long enough now for the legal challenges to be over and the case law established.

The issues now tend to be around dealers who are still ignorant of the law, and usually, unless you've had a major confrontation and really pissed off the dealer, a visit from a Trading Standards enforcer to explain the law, with the threat of prosecution, is enough to resolve any problems.

You just need to be persistent, don't back down and don't take any bullshit.

The law is essentially the same across the EU, although the enforcment mechanisms vary according to country. Outside the EU, I don't know the rules.

Rob[/QUOTE]

:plus:

He's right you know. The UK has some strange laws but this one actually helps us plebs for a change.

We have a transport department where I work and I get the missus car serviced here. Serviced at correct intervals with manufacturer approved parts by an approved service centre.

No, it's not dealer history, but it's the same. A dealer tried to offer a lower p/ex price as her car was serviced where I work. I told our fleet manager and he told me to ask them for it in writing as what the guy was saying was illegal.

Stand up for your rights :bond:

T06
06-30-2006, 04:15 AM
& it's a good thing too. We all have been shit on once too often here & there.