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View Full Version : New Pics of the 06..... starting to look good



mikeodial
11-15-2005, 07:46 PM
These are from motorcycle.com which has a great review of the bike there.

Beau1K
11-16-2005, 12:05 AM
You know what....the front has even less of a fairing...I don't know about that. I think the current model is naked enough. Going over 70mph on the freeway you hit a pretty good wind wall as it is...with that little windscreen it's going to be like the new speed triple.

helmethair
11-16-2005, 10:45 AM
These are from motorcycle.com which has a great review of the bike there.
Can you highlight some of the comments from the review?
Thanks for the pictures, nice!

Hokoyo
11-18-2005, 06:54 PM
Story By Yossef Schvetz - November, 2005

Italians are renown for their enviousness in romantic issues. Well, seems like
the tradition extends to bikes matters too. Envious of BMW's K1200R ESA system for suspension regulation on the fly, Aprilia just had to come up with a system of their own. It's only that in the Tuono R's case the system doesn't rely on pushbutton electronics gadgetry. By twisting a black rubber grip at the handlebar's right end you can regulate front-end height in a range of zero to about 3-4 feet in the first three gears. A shiny lever connected to a hydraulic piston receding just ahead of that rubber grip regulates rear end height by about the same amount regardless of the gear you're in. This smart system might not be as sophisticated as the K1200R's but it sure works, I can tell you that much?

Do I sound nerdy? Had to find a calmer way to start this review. Opening a road test with a bang-in-your face claim about how mind boggling this new Tuono R could cause MOridians to suspect I've taken something funny. Well I haven't but this Tuono thing is such a kick. An ear-to-ear grin, shout in your helmet, giggle under your visor factory, it will bring to light your hooligan animal
even if you never suspected you had one. A Prozac concentrate that will have you smiling like an idiot even if you just lost 100K dollars on Wall Street and that's not only because of the way this thing lofts both wheels at will. A good four years after the original Tuono's launch, other nakeds had come and gone and there might be new cocky kids in town but the Tuono still remains the weapon of choice for urban cowboys who like to shoot from the hip.


As before, this thing is "just" an RSV1000 that's been stripped naked but when you think about it, it's the only scoot that is remains faithful to the streetfighter philosophy. Only the unobtainable Benelli TNT (the factory isn't really functional right now) and the horrendously expensive MV Brutale come close to the Tuono in their brash morphing of a supersporting base tool into a high-bars street berm blaster. All the rest, Japanese nakeds that is, pale next to the Tuono R, extremely diluted interpretations of the streetfighter theme. The 919, Z1000, Fazer 1000? C'mmon, don't make the Tuono laugh, these are very blunt blades compared to this extra sharp razor.

Just like with the previous model, Aprilia took the base RSV1000, ripped off all bodywork and in order to cover up exposed non flattering areas, new smallish and technical looking panels been created. The bigger ones cover the coolant overflow reservoir and the external oil tank. The radiator received some covers too and these extend upwards to form little air deflectors. According to Aprilia, these stabilize the airflow around the bike and improve high-speed stability as well as looks. The old Tuono was characterized by a D-cup sized bikini fairing, a size imposed by the use of the old Mille light unit. By using the 2003 RSV's tiny headlamp cluster the hard mounted front shield can be much smaller and indeed, it has much better proportions than the old one. A ram-air

This is your view of Yossef's arms being pulled out of their sockets.
system is used on the Tuono, and just like in the RSV (and some Kawis), it routes pressurized air through two passages in the frame flanking the steering stem. Nice touch, a first on a naked. The fact that a Ram-Air system starts to deliver it's boost only above 120 mph, a speed at which your arms are being pulled out of their sockets, is of course another issue?

Aprilia's 60 degree V-Twin underwent major improvements in 2003 and if my memories of the Mugello launch serve me right (ouch!)it's really up there with that other, rather excellent twin, i.e. the 999. The "Magnesium" engine (as per the valve and side covers material) delivers a claimed 133 hp, bang on as in the RSV which means no detuning and compromises for a naked bike application, oh no. No bull about improved mid-range torque and other cover-your-bum stories by manufacturers that are afraid of letting us tame a real beast. A high handlebar racer, period. Nevertheless, some changes were required on the exhaust system and according to Aprilia, they actually improve the mid-range and power delivery without hurting top-end. Shorter than before gearing promises plenty of drive and as it would turns out, the Tuono does deliver it in spades.

I came across this very frame two years ago in Mugello. The main difference cycle wise is in the full set of Ohlins boinkers that were installed on the RSV "Factory" version I've tested back then. The new Tuono on the other hand wears a USD Showa fork and a Sachs shock in the back. As de-rigor in any self-respecting streetfighter, manual interface is entrusted to a golden double taper job sitting on beautiful risers. And this is just one of the many sexy details on this bike. The deeply sculpted frame is a feast to the eyes and the tank and gas units, kosher RSV 1000 parts are living lessons in giving form. The shapes designed two years ago by Scotsman Martin Longmore were so ahead of their time that these two components still look like a million dollars. But with all due respect to the parts carried over from the RSV, the final results leaves something to be desired. The small covers over the technical parts still look a bit crude and not up to the rest of the bike while the way the air deflectors are attached to the radiator is not something you'd write home about. Some will say that the Tuono's beauty is in fact in that light technical "ugliness", that twisted and subversive streetfighter Frankensteinian charm. Might be, but I still think that the Tuono's front end could be better solved. That said, the aggressive Ram-Air intake under the fairing is a sinister gem.
Beyond the personality trait noted above, Italians seem to have also a propensity to melodramatic opera acts. The concept was invented here after all. Aprilia's story for instance is charged with drama, up and downs and a main characters that rises up from the ashes only to fall back and who knows, maybe rise up again? Back in '69, the son of a bicycle maker named Ivano Beggio seemingly got tired of pedaling and decided to open up a small moped factory. From humble beginnings with a 50cc moped the company grew nicely into making bigger scooters. The guy is also very design conscious and early on, a proper design manger is put in place and Aprilia's produce becomes a synonymous with audacious design. Later on, tasty sporting 125's arrive and the AF1 replica racer becomes the subject of many an Italian teenagers' wet dream. Aprilia jumps in the 80's into grand prix racing, a crazy move in front of the might of Honda and Yamaha in the smaller classes. Yet the wins arrive and later on World championships too, all in less than 20 years. Not to mention the fact that the likes of Rossi, Capirossi and Biaggi, all grew under the caring hands of Aprilia's "reparto corse". The name is established then and in '99 a big bombshell arrives, the RSV Mille, a 1000cc Superbike that's just too good to be a first try from a manufacturer that produced until then only small capacity bikes and one 600 D/P single. Things start to go wrong when the introduction of a helmet law for mopeds in Italy drops sales of 50cc's drastically, a big income source for the firm. The situation is compounded further when Beggio, more out of passion than sound business sense buys the failing Moto Guzzi factory and the rights for the Laverda brand. Jumping into the MotoGP bandwagon with the huge investment required to develop the RS Cube doesn't help either. During the late90's boom years Beggio also invest heavily in his factory, founding an impressive R&D center but the general downturn in sales after 2000 wasn't in his plans. Very dire straights.

The moment arrives when Beggio understands that he just has to leave the center stage to allow the emergency management to come up with a saving deal for Aprilia. Very sad. After proposals from BMW, Ducati, Bombardier and others are refused, an acquisition/saving deal is sealed with arch-rivals, mega scooter makers, Piaggio. Not an easy achievement, the strong work force of Aprilia had to be convinced that their jobs would not be jeopardized in the deal. This huge conglomerate now houses the brands of Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, as well as older assets like Gilera, Derbi and of course the good old Vespa trademark with obvious advantages in terms of resources sharing, common logistics and sales operations. This huge group is now fourth in the world in terms of outright production numbers. With debts cleared and fresh money available, Aprilia is back to work at full steam. In a huge press conference held in Venice, right after the Tuono's launch, head honchos Colaninno (Piaggio) and Mercanti (Aprilia) revealed ambitious plans for the Venetian brand. Four to six new models a year (scooters included) and whole a new direction in future sportbikes. Aprilia is aiming to come back with a bang to Superbike racing with a V-4 1000 model and enter the 600-750 sector with light and powerful twins. Talk might be cheap but there is no denying that on this very first year alone, they are already delivering the goods. Two new exciting Guzzis, the Breva and Griso. This new Tuono, the very nice Pegaso 660 single in street and dual-purpose versions and of course the loony dirt/supermoto V-Twins. The 450 version has already won the FIM world supermoto championship last year, just in case you didn't know. Granted, many of these projects were started in Ivano Beggio's days, a testament to his genius and audacity but sure enough, without Piaggio's saving move they would have remained just drawer projects. Good days at last, Aprilia was getting good and they really deserved a second chance. Just don't forget that without Beggio, his passion, his vision, his spirit, none of this would have existed in the first place. Maximum respect.
-Yossef

End of complaints. As soon as I moved on from static admiration to brainless action in the south dolomites mental roads, any visual sin was soon forgiven. In this all too short day of mad riding, I found it really hard to come up with any bad words to say about Aprilia's R&D work. Well actually I found plenty of "bad words": Serial killer, illegal stuff, mental, real bad. You know the type of flattery this bike brings to mind is of that special kind. And here's another one, schizophrenic. Uh? At the beginning of our ride, as we follow the scooter mounted (500cc Atlantic) photographer, I was misled into thinking that I'm a top some light and pleasant Italian ladies bicycle. While calmly trotting along, this Tuono's engine is way more docile than I remember from the previous version, everything feels much more smooth and buttery. At low speeds the thing is perfectly balanced and light. Is this really the heir to the ultimate tool for cannonball runs?

The illusion that the Tuono is just a good yeshiva kid ends pretty soon. I happen to be in the company of the loony British press brigade and after a few minutes appraisal of the Tuono's feminine side, the feast begins in earnest. We're in a really tight road, slow and gnarly, there's hardly a straight longer than 50 yards between twists in sight yet all of the sudden, as if in unison, the whole herd is monowheeling! That's exactly the point where I also ask myself: What is this rubber twist grip good for? Let's see? 5,000 rpm, second gear, I feather the throttle, open up again and up she goes for a nice 50-100 yards. Mmmm. Nice. And I wasn't even trying? The wheeling orgy all around just goes on. These guys have a point to prove, "who keeps it up longest" I guess and having a female motorcycle journalist in the area that might notice their prowess must be an incentive. With me being somewhat wheelie challenged, I simply enjoy the feeling of riding this 133-hp mountain bike. The possibility to pick up your front in every possible and impossible occasion, the way the Tuono shoots forward with every caress of the throttle and for the moment it looks like we are just tickling the frame. Such is the sensation of rigidness. In the first few hours we are mainly busy with photo shooting but two facts stand out. This thing goes down to full lean, tire edge feathering angles in a jiffy and stays put as if on rails. Second, I really dislike the original equipment 208 Dunlops. They do have grip but not much feel and they take ages to warm up. Another lean here, another lean there smiling for the birdie, it's getting on my nerve, I need to really ride. My colleagues seemingly need some more wheeling shots (It help magazine sales, so I hear) so I leave them and attack some of the sick roads chosen by Aprilia for our ride. In the slow and tortuous what youreally need is a tool that responds to every milimetrical input. Get off the line in one off the blind corners around here and you might end up planted in some car's engine bay.

Yeah, servitude and precision in executing commands and the Tuono responds to mine like some fresh army recruit willing to please his Sargent. Down on your side! Yes sir! Now to the other! Yes sir! These side to side lean angle switches can be done with the Tuono at wrap speed and if you gas it some in the process you get those naughty little wheelies while your bars are twisted over as a reward. Brake hard, boot a couple of gears down and the anti chattering system (operating on engine vaccum) limits distracting wheel chipring to a minimum while you are pointing the Tuono towards the next apex. Some of the roads we ride on are far from having a perfect surface. There are some wet spots from yesterday's rain, some potholes, yet the Tuono's frame and suspension take everything in their stride. The Showa/Sachs combo is calibrated on the harder side and might not be top shelve stuff but it manages to filter out imperfections quite okay considering this scoot's orientation and keep the whole plot in perfect control. Another positive aspect is that the smoother power delivery of the magnesium engine lets you fight less with the bars when powering out of turns. The previous Tuono had a propensity to wiggle bars and run wide sometimes when applying the power yet this new model stays far more planted. After a launch break in the amazing castle we spent the night in, I join a few throttle happy British colleagues and Aprilia's UK importer Paul Walker for an afternoon blast. Chris Moss, a journo with an interesting reputation tells me " Hey, don't go crazy man, somebody got pulled over by the cops already". I have my own worries. After destroying an RSV in the name of objective journalism the last thing I want is to crash another 'Priler. So we head towards a much more flowing road and we proceed at a semi quick pace. Paul's presence seemingly calms down the spirits a bit. Well, as I said before, there is something about the Tuono that sooner or later will bring out the worst in you. You can guess what happened next. Some fast sweepers appear on our sights and gaaaaaaaaaaasssssssss! Nice handfuls, from the bottom of our hearts. A good thing really, because regardless of the possible painful consequences, it turns out that the faster the going, the better this thing gets.

When the tarmac changes from a slow mental road to a fast mental road, the Tuono shows his supersporting animal. Throw the thing into 90mph, 100mph or faster sweepers and it tracks with scalpel like precision. The wide handlebar should in theory induce some imprecision but in reality, when I needed to aim the Tuono at speed between the converging lines of the two solid stone walls lining the road, the accuracy was there. At these four, fifth gear turns, the reduced drive enables me to really roll it on in the exits and it's a real pleasure to let the engine play in the higher octaves. The thing gives an extra crazy shove between 7-10K. On really high speeds I've got not much to tell. I offered my companions to hop on the Autostrada for a last top speed check but nobody seemed inclined to contribute to the health of the Italian highway system by paying the required toll. But who really wants to know if a naked fighter does 150 or just 140? By that time your neck vertebras are about to snap anyway. At a certain point we do a sad U-turn. We have to be back but we've could have stayed in this crazy playground a few more hours. It's been a while since I've ridden something that put me in such a kill, kill, kill mood. Or maybe it was for the better, who knows how it would have ended up. As I attack a last high speed right hander, I realize that we are riding over some kind of bridge with the accompanying steel expansion joints, at full lean that is? "Shite!" goes I but the Tuono makes nary a wobble, it tracks on as if nothing. Phew!

At the end of the day, after the adrenaline rush was over, I still had a hard time coming up with "neo." Maybe the rear shock should be equipped with compression adjustment and not just rebound in a bike as serious as the Tuono. Maybe the insensitive and too strong rear brake deserves improvement. The front binders by the way are divine. It's just that the brakes, as this whole scoot, require a fine touch, someone that knows what he's doing. Ask the American journo that ended up the day in a full-length leg cast after locking up the front? So here's the catch. Drive like a proper human being and the thing will purr like a pussycat. Wag it's tail, roll the throttle that tiny bit faster and it becomes a wheelie monster and brings you to the next turn 20 mph faster than you intended, maybe with the front still pawing the air. The first Tuono won some coveted "Best street bike" honors in the US press and elsewhere, yet this one is even sharper and better finished too. Maybe just that tiny bit more civilized in its engine response. At the end of the day it still is the one, true, out-of the-box streetfighter and it does it's combat duties admirably. But are you sharp enough for it?

TECHNICAL CHART
** Specs Provided by Aprilia **

Photographs, technical data, specifications and colours refer to the Italian market version and may be subject to change without prior notice. For detailed information on the technical characteristics of the vehicle sold in your country, contact an Aprilia dealer.
Engine V60 Magnesium. Longitudinal 60 V twin, four stroke. Liquid cooling with three-way pressurised circuit. Double overhead cams, mixed gear/chain timing drive, four valves per cylinder. Patented AVDC anti-vibration double countershaft.
Fuel 95 RON unleaded petrol.
Bore and stroke 97 x 67.5 mm.
Displacement 997.62 cc.
Compression ratio 11.8:1.
Maximum power at the crank 98 kW (133 HP) at 9,500 rpm.
Maximum torque at the crank 10.4 kgm (102 Nm) at 8,750 rpm.
Fuel system Integrated electronic engine management system. Indirect multi-point electronic injection. 57 mm diameter throttle bodies.
Ignition Digital electronic ignition, integrated with the injection control system. One spark plug per cylinder.
Starting Electric starter.
Exhaust system Two silencers with three way catalytic converter and lambda oxygen sensor (Euro 3).
Generator 12 V - 500 W.
Lubrication Dry sump with separate oil reservoir. Double trochoidal pump with oil cooler. Steel oil reservoir.
Gearbox 6 speed. Transmission ratios:
1st 34/15 (2.27)
2nd 31/19 (1.63)
3rd 26/20 (1.3)
4th 24/22 (1.091)
5th 24/25 (0.96)
6th 23/26 (0.88)
Clutch Multiple disc in oil bath with patented PPC power-assisted hydraulic control. Metal braid clutch line. Radial master cylinder with 15 mm piston.
Primary drive Spur gears. Transmission ratio: 60/31 (1.935:1).
Final drive Chain.
Transmission ratio: 40/16 (2.5:1).
Frame Box section sloping twin-spar frame in aluminium alloy.
Front suspension Showa 43 mm upside-down fork with adjustment for spring preload, compression and rebound damping. 120 mm wheel travel.
Rear suspension Aluminium alloy double banana swingarm. APS (Aprilia Progressive System) rising rate linkages. Sachs hydraulic monoshock with adjustment for spring preload and rebound damping.
Wheel travel 133 mm.
Brakes Front: Brembo double floating disk in stainless steel, Outside Dia. 320 mm. Brembo triple bridge caliper with four 34 mm pistons and four sintered pads. Metal braided brake line.

Rear: Brembo stainless steel disk, Outside Dia. 220 mm. Twin piston calliper, 32 mm diameter pistons, sintered pads. Metal braided brake line.
Wheels Aluminium alloy.
Front: 3.50 x 17"
Rear: 6.00 x 17".
Tyres Radial tubeless.
Front: 120/70 ZR 17.
Rear: 190/50 ZR 17 (alternative: 180/55 ZR 17 and 190/55).
Dimensions Maximum length: 2,025 mm
Maximum width: 830 mm (at handlebars)
Maximum height: 1,100 mm (at handlebars)
Seat height: 810 mm
Handlebar height: 1,020 mm at bar ends
Wheelbase: 1,410 mm
Trail: 103.7 mm
Steering angle: 25
*Claimed* Dry weight (without battery) 185 kg
Tank Capacity 18 litres, 4 litre reserve.
Colours Silver, Black, Fluo Red.
Accessories Aprilia by Akrapovic SLIP-ON 2x2 Street legal exhausts Aprilia By Akrapovic, Street Legal Complete exhaust system, compatibility with Ohlins front-fork group (radial calliper joint), aluminium adjustable rear shock absorber, stainless steel adjustable rear shock absorber, adjustable aluminium footrests, ergal riverse pattern gearshifter, forged magnesium wheels, 15" pinion, slid-lateral protection kit, carbon dx-sx side panels, carbon Tank hose protection, carbon oil-tank cover, carbon dx-sx spoile, carbon saddle cover, carbon front mudguard, carbon rearmudguard, carbon dx-sx footrests protectors, carbon hand protections (fixed to the handlebar, extraresistant carbon) kit, bigger windshield kit, tank bag, rear stand, Aprilia electronic anti-theft system.

ARAIHEAD
11-19-2005, 01:04 PM
RED
Story By Yossef Schvetz - November, 2005

Italians are renown for their enviousness in romantic issues. Well, seems like
the tradition extends to bikes matters too. Envious of BMW's K1200R ESA system for suspension regulation on the fly, Aprilia just had to come up with a system of their own. It's only that in the Tuono R's case the system doesn't rely on pushbutton electronics gadgetry. By twisting a black rubber grip at the handlebar's right end you can regulate front-end height in a range of zero to about 3-4 feet in the first three gears. A shiny lever connected to a hydraulic piston receding just ahead of that rubber grip regulates rear end height by about the same amount regardless of the gear you're in. This smart system might not be as sophisticated as the K1200R's but it sure works, I can tell you that much?

Do I sound nerdy? Had to find a calmer way to start this review. Opening a road test with a bang-in-your face claim about how mind boggling this new Tuono R could cause MOridians to suspect I've taken something funny. Well I haven't but this Tuono thing is such a kick. An ear-to-ear grin, shout in your helmet, giggle under your visor factory, it will bring to light your hooligan animal
even if you never suspected you had one. A Prozac concentrate that will have you smiling like an idiot even if you just lost 100K dollars on Wall Street and that's not only because of the way this thing lofts both wheels at will. A good four years after the original Tuono's launch, other nakeds had come and gone and there might be new cocky kids in town but the Tuono still remains the weapon of choice for urban cowboys who like to shoot from the hip.


As before, this thing is "just" an RSV1000 that's been stripped naked but when you think about it, it's the only scoot that is remains faithful to the streetfighter philosophy. Only the unobtainable Benelli TNT (the factory isn't really functional right now) and the horrendously expensive MV Brutale come close to the Tuono in their brash morphing of a supersporting base tool into a high-bars street berm blaster. All the rest, Japanese nakeds that is, pale next to the Tuono R, extremely diluted interpretations of the streetfighter theme. The 919, Z1000, Fazer 1000? C'mmon, don't make the Tuono laugh, these are very blunt blades compared to this extra sharp razor.

Just like with the previous model, Aprilia took the base RSV1000, ripped off all bodywork and in order to cover up exposed non flattering areas, new smallish and technical looking panels been created. The bigger ones cover the coolant overflow reservoir and the external oil tank. The radiator received some covers too and these extend upwards to form little air deflectors. According to Aprilia, these stabilize the airflow around the bike and improve high-speed stability as well as looks. The old Tuono was characterized by a D-cup sized bikini fairing, a size imposed by the use of the old Mille light unit. By using the 2003 RSV's tiny headlamp cluster the hard mounted front shield can be much smaller and indeed, it has much better proportions than the old one. A ram-air

This is your view of Yossef's arms being pulled out of their sockets.
system is used on the Tuono, and just like in the RSV (and some Kawis), it routes pressurized air through two passages in the frame flanking the steering stem. Nice touch, a first on a naked. The fact that a Ram-Air system starts to deliver it's boost only above 120 mph, a speed at which your arms are being pulled out of their sockets, is of course another issue?

Aprilia's 60 degree V-Twin underwent major improvements in 2003 and if my memories of the Mugello launch serve me right (ouch!)it's really up there with that other, rather excellent twin, i.e. the 999. The "Magnesium" engine (as per the valve and side covers material) delivers a claimed 133 hp, bang on as in the RSV which means no detuning and compromises for a naked bike application, oh no. No bull about improved mid-range torque and other cover-your-bum stories by manufacturers that are afraid of letting us tame a real beast. A high handlebar racer, period. Nevertheless, some changes were required on the exhaust system and according to Aprilia, they actually improve the mid-range and power delivery without hurting top-end. Shorter than before gearing promises plenty of drive and as it would turns out, the Tuono does deliver it in spades.

I came across this very frame two years ago in Mugello. The main difference cycle wise is in the full set of Ohlins boinkers that were installed on the RSV "Factory" version I've tested back then. The new Tuono on the other hand wears a USD Showa fork and a Sachs shock in the back. As de-rigor in any self-respecting streetfighter, manual interface is entrusted to a golden double taper job sitting on beautiful risers. And this is just one of the many sexy details on this bike. The deeply sculpted frame is a feast to the eyes and the tank and gas units, kosher RSV 1000 parts are living lessons in giving form. The shapes designed two years ago by Scotsman Martin Longmore were so ahead of their time that these two components still look like a million dollars. But with all due respect to the parts carried over from the RSV, the final results leaves something to be desired. The small covers over the technical parts still look a bit crude and not up to the rest of the bike while the way the air deflectors are attached to the radiator is not something you'd write home about. Some will say that the Tuono's beauty is in fact in that light technical "ugliness", that twisted and subversive streetfighter Frankensteinian charm. Might be, but I still think that the Tuono's front end could be better solved. That said, the aggressive Ram-Air intake under the fairing is a sinister gem.
Beyond the personality trait noted above, Italians seem to have also a propensity to melodramatic opera acts. The concept was invented here after all. Aprilia's story for instance is charged with drama, up and downs and a main characters that rises up from the ashes only to fall back and who knows, maybe rise up again? Back in '69, the son of a bicycle maker named Ivano Beggio seemingly got tired of pedaling and decided to open up a small moped factory. From humble beginnings with a 50cc moped the company grew nicely into making bigger scooters. The guy is also very design conscious and early on, a proper design manger is put in place and Aprilia's produce becomes a synonymous with audacious design. Later on, tasty sporting 125's arrive and the AF1 replica racer becomes the subject of many an Italian teenagers' wet dream. Aprilia jumps in the 80's into grand prix racing, a crazy move in front of the might of Honda and Yamaha in the smaller classes. Yet the wins arrive and later on World championships too, all in less than 20 years. Not to mention the fact that the likes of Rossi, Capirossi and Biaggi, all grew under the caring hands of Aprilia's "reparto corse". The name is established then and in '99 a big bombshell arrives, the RSV Mille, a 1000cc Superbike that's just too good to be a first try from a manufacturer that produced until then only small capacity bikes and one 600 D/P single. Things start to go wrong when the introduction of a helmet law for mopeds in Italy drops sales of 50cc's drastically, a big income source for the firm. The situation is compounded further when Beggio, more out of passion than sound business sense buys the failing Moto Guzzi factory and the rights for the Laverda brand. Jumping into the MotoGP bandwagon with the huge investment required to develop the RS Cube doesn't help either. During the late90's boom years Beggio also invest heavily in his factory, founding an impressive R&D center but the general downturn in sales after 2000 wasn't in his plans. Very dire straights.

The moment arrives when Beggio understands that he just has to leave the center stage to allow the emergency management to come up with a saving deal for Aprilia. Very sad. After proposals from BMW, Ducati, Bombardier and others are refused, an acquisition/saving deal is sealed with arch-rivals, mega scooter makers, Piaggio. Not an easy achievement, the strong work force of Aprilia had to be convinced that their jobs would not be jeopardized in the deal. This huge conglomerate now houses the brands of Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, as well as older assets like Gilera, Derbi and of course the good old Vespa trademark with obvious advantages in terms of resources sharing, common logistics and sales operations. This huge group is now fourth in the world in terms of outright production numbers. With debts cleared and fresh money available, Aprilia is back to work at full steam. In a huge press conference held in Venice, right after the Tuono's launch, head honchos Colaninno (Piaggio) and Mercanti (Aprilia) revealed ambitious plans for the Venetian brand. Four to six new models a year (scooters included) and whole a new direction in future sportbikes. Aprilia is aiming to come back with a bang to Superbike racing with a V-4 1000 model and enter the 600-750 sector with light and powerful twins. Talk might be cheap but there is no denying that on this very first year alone, they are already delivering the goods. Two new exciting Guzzis, the Breva and Griso. This new Tuono, the very nice Pegaso 660 single in street and dual-purpose versions and of course the loony dirt/supermoto V-Twins. The 450 version has already won the FIM world supermoto championship last year, just in case you didn't know. Granted, many of these projects were started in Ivano Beggio's days, a testament to his genius and audacity but sure enough, without Piaggio's saving move they would have remained just drawer projects. Good days at last, Aprilia was getting good and they really deserved a second chance. Just don't forget that without Beggio, his passion, his vision, his spirit, none of this would have existed in the first place. Maximum respect.
-Yossef

End of complaints. As soon as I moved on from static admiration to brainless action in the south dolomites mental roads, any visual sin was soon forgiven. In this all too short day of mad riding, I found it really hard to come up with any bad words to say about Aprilia's R&D work. Well actually I found plenty of "bad words": Serial killer, illegal stuff, mental, real bad. You know the type of flattery this bike brings to mind is of that special kind. And here's another one, schizophrenic. Uh? At the beginning of our ride, as we follow the scooter mounted (500cc Atlantic) photographer, I was misled into thinking that I'm a top some light and pleasant Italian ladies bicycle. While calmly trotting along, this Tuono's engine is way more docile than I remember from the previous version, everything feels much more smooth and buttery. At low speeds the thing is perfectly balanced and light. Is this really the heir to the ultimate tool for cannonball runs?

The illusion that the Tuono is just a good yeshiva kid ends pretty soon. I happen to be in the company of the loony British press brigade and after a few minutes appraisal of the Tuono's feminine side, the feast begins in earnest. We're in a really tight road, slow and gnarly, there's hardly a straight longer than 50 yards between twists in sight yet all of the sudden, as if in unison, the whole herd is monowheeling! That's exactly the point where I also ask myself: What is this rubber twist grip good for? Let's see? 5,000 rpm, second gear, I feather the throttle, open up again and up she goes for a nice 50-100 yards. Mmmm. Nice. And I wasn't even trying? The wheeling orgy all around just goes on. These guys have a point to prove, "who keeps it up longest" I guess and having a female motorcycle journalist in the area that might notice their prowess must be an incentive. With me being somewhat wheelie challenged, I simply enjoy the feeling of riding this 133-hp mountain bike. The possibility to pick up your front in every possible and impossible occasion, the way the Tuono shoots forward with every caress of the throttle and for the moment it looks like we are just tickling the frame. Such is the sensation of rigidness. In the first few hours we are mainly busy with photo shooting but two facts stand out. This thing goes down to full lean, tire edge feathering angles in a jiffy and stays put as if on rails. Second, I really dislike the original equipment 208 Dunlops. They do have grip but not much feel and they take ages to warm up. Another lean here, another lean there smiling for the birdie, it's getting on my nerve, I need to really ride. My colleagues seemingly need some more wheeling shots (It help magazine sales, so I hear) so I leave them and attack some of the sick roads chosen by Aprilia for our ride. In the slow and tortuous what youreally need is a tool that responds to every milimetrical input. Get off the line in one off the blind corners around here and you might end up planted in some car's engine bay.

Yeah, servitude and precision in executing commands and the Tuono responds to mine like some fresh army recruit willing to please his Sargent. Down on your side! Yes sir! Now to the other! Yes sir! These side to side lean angle switches can be done with the Tuono at wrap speed and if you gas it some in the process you get those naughty little wheelies while your bars are twisted over as a reward. Brake hard, boot a couple of gears down and the anti chattering system (operating on engine vaccum) limits distracting wheel chipring to a minimum while you are pointing the Tuono towards the next apex. Some of the roads we ride on are far from having a perfect surface. There are some wet spots from yesterday's rain, some potholes, yet the Tuono's frame and suspension take everything in their stride. The Showa/Sachs combo is calibrated on the harder side and might not be top shelve stuff but it manages to filter out imperfections quite okay considering this scoot's orientation and keep the whole plot in perfect control. Another positive aspect is that the smoother power delivery of the magnesium engine lets you fight less with the bars when powering out of turns. The previous Tuono had a propensity to wiggle bars and run wide sometimes when applying the power yet this new model stays far more planted. After a launch break in the amazing castle we spent the night in, I join a few throttle happy British colleagues and Aprilia's UK importer Paul Walker for an afternoon blast. Chris Moss, a journo with an interesting reputation tells me " Hey, don't go crazy man, somebody got pulled over by the cops already". I have my own worries. After destroying an RSV in the name of objective journalism the last thing I want is to crash another 'Priler. So we head towards a much more flowing road and we proceed at a semi quick pace. Paul's presence seemingly calms down the spirits a bit. Well, as I said before, there is something about the Tuono that sooner or later will bring out the worst in you. You can guess what happened next. Some fast sweepers appear on our sights and gaaaaaaaaaaasssssssss! Nice handfuls, from the bottom of our hearts. A good thing really, because regardless of the possible painful consequences, it turns out that the faster the going, the better this thing gets.

When the tarmac changes from a slow mental road to a fast mental road, the Tuono shows his supersporting animal. Throw the thing into 90mph, 100mph or faster sweepers and it tracks with scalpel like precision. The wide handlebar should in theory induce some imprecision but in reality, when I needed to aim the Tuono at speed between the converging lines of the two solid stone walls lining the road, the accuracy was there. At these four, fifth gear turns, the reduced drive enables me to really roll it on in the exits and it's a real pleasure to let the engine play in the higher octaves. The thing gives an extra crazy shove between 7-10K. On really high speeds I've got not much to tell. I offered my companions to hop on the Autostrada for a last top speed check but nobody seemed inclined to contribute to the health of the Italian highway system by paying the required toll. But who really wants to know if a naked fighter does 150 or just 140? By that time your neck vertebras are about to snap anyway. At a certain point we do a sad U-turn. We have to be back but we've could have stayed in this crazy playground a few more hours. It's been a while since I've ridden something that put me in such a kill, kill, kill mood. Or maybe it was for the better, who knows how it would have ended up. As I attack a last high speed right hander, I realize that we are riding over some kind of bridge with the accompanying steel expansion joints, at full lean that is? "Shite!" goes I but the Tuono makes nary a wobble, it tracks on as if nothing. Phew!

At the end of the day, after the adrenaline rush was over, I still had a hard time coming up with "neo." Maybe the rear shock should be equipped with compression adjustment and not just rebound in a bike as serious as the Tuono. Maybe the insensitive and too strong rear brake deserves improvement. The front binders by the way are divine. It's just that the brakes, as this whole scoot, require a fine touch, someone that knows what he's doing. Ask the American journo that ended up the day in a full-length leg cast after locking up the front? So here's the catch. Drive like a proper human being and the thing will purr like a pussycat. Wag it's tail, roll the throttle that tiny bit faster and it becomes a wheelie monster and brings you to the next turn 20 mph faster than you intended, maybe with the front still pawing the air. The first Tuono won some coveted "Best street bike" honors in the US press and elsewhere, yet this one is even sharper and better finished too. Maybe just that tiny bit more civilized in its engine response. At the end of the day it still is the one, true, out-of the-box streetfighter and it does it's combat duties admirably. But are you sharp enough for it?

TECHNICAL CHART
** Specs Provided by Aprilia **

Photographs, technical data, specifications and colours refer to the Italian market version and may be subject to change without prior notice. For detailed information on the technical characteristics of the vehicle sold in your country, contact an Aprilia dealer.
Engine V60 Magnesium. Longitudinal 60 V twin, four stroke. Liquid cooling with three-way pressurised circuit. Double overhead cams, mixed gear/chain timing drive, four valves per cylinder. Patented AVDC anti-vibration double countershaft.
Fuel 95 RON unleaded petrol.
Bore and stroke 97 x 67.5 mm.
Displacement 997.62 cc.
Compression ratio 11.8:1.
Maximum power at the crank 98 kW (133 HP) at 9,500 rpm.
Maximum torque at the crank 10.4 kgm (102 Nm) at 8,750 rpm.
Fuel system Integrated electronic engine management system. Indirect multi-point electronic injection. 57 mm diameter throttle bodies.
Ignition Digital electronic ignition, integrated with the injection control system. One spark plug per cylinder.
Starting Electric starter.
Exhaust system Two silencers with three way catalytic converter and lambda oxygen sensor (Euro 3).
Generator 12 V - 500 W.
Lubrication Dry sump with separate oil reservoir. Double trochoidal pump with oil cooler. Steel oil reservoir.
Gearbox 6 speed. Transmission ratios:
1st 34/15 (2.27)
2nd 31/19 (1.63)
3rd 26/20 (1.3)
4th 24/22 (1.091)
5th 24/25 (0.96)
6th 23/26 (0.88)
Clutch Multiple disc in oil bath with patented PPC power-assisted hydraulic control. Metal braid clutch line. Radial master cylinder with 15 mm piston.
Primary drive Spur gears. Transmission ratio: 60/31 (1.935:1).
Final drive Chain.
Transmission ratio: 40/16 (2.5:1).
Frame Box section sloping twin-spar frame in aluminium alloy.
Front suspension Showa 43 mm upside-down fork with adjustment for spring preload, compression and rebound damping. 120 mm wheel travel.
Rear suspension Aluminium alloy double banana swingarm. APS (Aprilia Progressive System) rising rate linkages. Sachs hydraulic monoshock with adjustment for spring preload and rebound damping.
Wheel travel 133 mm.
Brakes Front: Brembo double floating disk in stainless steel, Outside Dia. 320 mm. Brembo triple bridge caliper with four 34 mm pistons and four sintered pads. Metal braided brake line.

Rear: Brembo stainless steel disk, Outside Dia. 220 mm. Twin piston calliper, 32 mm diameter pistons, sintered pads. Metal braided brake line.
Wheels Aluminium alloy.
Front: 3.50 x 17"
Rear: 6.00 x 17".
Tyres Radial tubeless.
Front: 120/70 ZR 17.
Rear: 190/50 ZR 17 (alternative: 180/55 ZR 17 and 190/55).
Dimensions Maximum length: 2,025 mm
Maximum width: 830 mm (at handlebars)
Maximum height: 1,100 mm (at handlebars)
Seat height: 810 mm
Handlebar height: 1,020 mm at bar ends
Wheelbase: 1,410 mm
Trail: 103.7 mm
Steering angle: 25
*Claimed* Dry weight (without battery) 185 kg
Tank Capacity 18 litres, 4 litre reserve.
Colours Silver, Black, Fluo Red.
Accessories Aprilia by Akrapovic SLIP-ON 2x2 Street legal exhausts Aprilia By Akrapovic, Street Legal Complete exhaust system, compatibility with Ohlins front-fork group (radial calliper joint), aluminium adjustable rear shock absorber, stainless steel adjustable rear shock absorber, adjustable aluminium footrests, ergal riverse pattern gearshifter, forged magnesium wheels, 15" pinion, slid-lateral protection kit, carbon dx-sx side panels, carbon Tank hose protection, carbon oil-tank cover, carbon dx-sx spoile, carbon saddle cover, carbon front mudguard, carbon rearmudguard, carbon dx-sx footrests protectors, carbon hand protections (fixed to the handlebar, extraresistant carbon) kit, bigger windshield kit, tank bag, rear stand, Aprilia electronic anti-theft system.
SORRY, DIDNT GET THAT COULD YOU REPEAT PLEASE.!!!! LOl !!! :funnypost :funnypost :funnypost :funnypost

cornercarver
11-22-2005, 06:44 PM
I like the lines, but hate the paint. The bright red checker leave a LOT to be desired. It looks great from any angle where the tank paint isn't visible.

--sam

Ricky J
11-23-2005, 05:29 PM
It would seem to be a winner dynamically but those paintjobs spoil the effect. Perhaps it's time to borrow a page from Ducati's book and do single color schemes with restrained graphics? This new Tuono screams for Aprilia's own metallic flame red.

BikerBrit
11-23-2005, 11:34 PM
Having just reviewed some pics of the Clarkie Tuono I would have to agree with you Ricky. The dark menacing look of that bike just suits the mean and nasty nature of the Tuono to a tee.