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Badger222
08-31-2004, 08:38 AM
Has anyone got any pictures of their speedo with some BIG numbers on?????:devil:

snormr
08-31-2004, 10:49 PM
Hey, Apex...screw the top-speed numbers...277 are some huge numbers on a tank of gas ;)

Rob

ApexMolester
08-31-2004, 11:06 PM
i was on the 3rd tank of the ride

snormr
09-01-2004, 08:33 AM
Yes...figured that...hence the wink. :)

EastBay
09-01-2004, 02:43 PM
... ok, fine... well then, does someone know what the top speed of our Tuono's is??? Based on rpm it should be around 170 mph, but I think the wind will keep it under that.

EastBay

bluestreak
09-01-2004, 03:28 PM
I beleive in stock trim the sales broucher says 157 MPH. Personally I've seen 141 MPH, but that's just me, not hanging in there until it had maxed out. Maybe someday on a track.
I'd rather be wheeling than blasting by the country side so fast I can't comprehend what I just passed.

To each his own. Ride safe!

gordon gauge
09-01-2004, 03:41 PM
FWIW, mine came off the dyno reading 158 mph. GG

vito
09-01-2004, 03:53 PM
seems like i read somewhere that top speed of the stock tuono was 164.

ApexMolester
09-01-2004, 04:55 PM
however you loose it when you disconnect the battery.

Manu
09-02-2004, 01:58 AM
I saw 258 kmph or 161.25 mph verified in a mag for a derestricted stock Tuono racing.
The speedo looks very accurate cause it was 259 kmph indicated

Badger222
09-03-2004, 08:01 AM
Have had an indicated 150mph, but I find that when I get in the region of 130 onwards the bike starts to lift, I think it could be due to design of the upper fairing ie: flat underneath. I think the real fun is the acceleration, throwing it round the bends with confidence.... Best bike I have owned so far:peace:

EastBay
09-09-2004, 03:04 PM
152 mph

October Cycle World mag has a nice brief write-up on the Tuono claiming it has a top speed of 152 mph. That must be stock/ restricted.

Plus it claims the horsepower is less than 110.

EastBay

Andrew
09-09-2004, 03:36 PM
Anyone else notice the head shaking at around +125 mph? Does the Ohlins damper help this?

karldewey
09-09-2004, 03:39 PM
149 mph derestricted but otherwise stock at 7500+ feet above sea level. A bit breazy (okay, hurricane-like) but otherwise very stable.

I didn't buy the bike for its topend and have since lowered the gearing but had to see what it was capable of.:)

M747gm
09-09-2004, 03:57 PM
No matter how lightly I hold onto the bars, just lhard enough to keep the throttle on, it starts to unravel at about 125., then gets downright scary at 133-35. I've tried it on the stock 207'rrs and diablo's same result. I've switched Tuono's with a buddy, his on Michelins and both of us still experienced the shakes at high speed.

I know guys are going to say your holding on too tight, I don't believe thats it. I've tried many, many times and always have the same result and have never had this problem on another bike.

karldewey
09-09-2004, 04:18 PM
Originally posted by M747gm
No matter how lightly I hold onto the bars, just lhard enough to keep the throttle on, it starts to unravel at about 125., then gets downright scary at 133-35. I've tried it on the stock 207'rrs and diablo's same result. I've switched Tuono's with a buddy, his on Michelins and both of us still experienced the shakes at high speed.


I run Metzler Sportecs and have never experienced this.

TuonoR6
09-09-2004, 05:05 PM
Make sure your fork height is correct in the tripple. Measure the amount each fork sticks out of the tripple. This could be your problem. Even from the factory their not perfect you know

STREGA 170
09-20-2004, 11:56 PM
JUST RETURNED FROM A 900MI ROAD TRIP. ON DIABLO'S, I HAVE BEEN 152MPH ON A LESS THAN SMOOTH ROAD BEFORE AND THE BIKE WAS ABSOLUTELY DEAD NUTS STABLE WITH NO HEAD SHAKE WHAT SO EVER. ON THIS LAST TRIP WHAT I DID NOTICE FOR THE FIRST TIME WAS THE BIKE WOULD SORT OF JUST WONDER AROUND A BIT AND NOT FOLLOW A STRAIGHT TRAC. AFTER ABOUT 20 MILES OF THIS I FIGURED OUT WHAT WAS GOING ON. IT WAS QUITE WINDY AT THE TIME SO A CONSTANT STEERING CORRECTION WAS IN ORDER. THIS HAD ME DOING A "RIDER INDUCED OSCILLATION" I STOPPED FOR FUEL AND ADDED ONE MORE CLICK TO THE OHLINS STEERING DAMPER AND WHOLA! PROBLEM SOLVED. THAT THING REALLY WORKS! SOON AFTER I PURCHASED THE BIKE I HAD A FIRST RATE, SEASONED MECHANIC AND RACER HELP ME WITH THE SUSPENSION SET UP WHICH WAS WAY OFF FROM THE DEALER. A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT BIKE AFTER THAT. ALL THAT HIGH DOLLAR SUSPENSION. USE IT!

imbyrum
09-21-2004, 01:04 AM
I have seen mine at 158 to fast for me on a short road

bluestreak
09-21-2004, 09:51 AM
M747

My two cents on your handling problem.
You can ask anyone who race our bikes and they will tell you that the Tuono is basically a very stable machine at high speeds. You may a very serious issue with the frame, alignment, tire problem or something else. I would not ride the bike at high speed until you have discovered the problem.
Things to check:

Tire concentricity and alignment on rims. Make sure tire tire is not loosing a belt or belt shift which could cause it to come apart at high speed. Remove the tire and inspect it from the inside. If in doubt replace it. Ask Ben Spies what it's like to have a tire let go at 180 mph. Not a good thing. Front to back tire alignment should be checked. Use a striaght edge or string, not swing arm marks to check this. They may be stamped wrong.

Frame issues. Remove the tank, seat and body parts and inspect the frame at ALL weld joints for cracks. Inspect the neck and back bone areas closely. Use a mirror to look at place you can't get at. Inspect the swing arm and it's point of connection at pivot points and where the shock attaches.

Front fork spring pre-load can be a problem if they are not the same on both sides. check it. Remove front wheel and make sure the forks slide up mand down with the same force required to move each one. They should be the same.

Head shake is a serious problem and must be corrected. If you have checked the basic things that could cause it like fork height, rear shock height adjustment and general bike setup, it may indicate a very serious problem with your bike. Have the dealer check the above items or do it yourself, but get it done. These checks are very time consuming but it will take considerably longer to heal after a high speed "Get Off"............if you survive it. I'm not trying to scare people, but I think we sometime take going fast for granted because todays bikes are so good. A bike should be in top working condition to safley operate at the speeds they are capable of because a small mechanical issue could spell trouble at high speed. I would be testing the bike with full leathers and on a long desolete road with buddies nearby.

Hedge your bets and protectec yourself for the worse case event.

Andrew
09-21-2004, 10:10 AM
I do not disagree with anything Bluestreak said. However, I think that the problem with the Tuono may be aerodynamic, not something wrong with the design. In my case, I believe the shake at +125 is more to do with high speed wind hitting the bars and the rider. Sounds like an Ohlins damper may help or possibly a bigger screen.

As was said, the Mille has no such issue. I have bombed along on an RC51 and RF900R, and both were smooth at 160 (as smooth as can be expected I guess). I think being able to tuck in behind the fairing, and have significantly more weight on the front tire helps these bikes at those speeds.

Just my opinion, nothing more.

Manu
09-22-2004, 05:52 AM
It' s been said before but the crucial point here is to stay relaxed at the bars. The wide Tuono bars generate a big leverage that acts like an amplifier easilly transforming any wrong input in front end wobble...

Scary
09-22-2004, 07:29 AM
I too totally agree with bluestreak. I've pushed 220 + kmph more than once without any problems, on a track of course ;) I did notice lift as air pressure increased on the chest & therefore transferred more of the weight bias to the rear. That would get worse with heavier/bigger riders but can be off set by dropping the front down in the triple trees. But who runs around at those speeds all the time "A".
In the early '80's when we used to run much heavier super bikes on the track (Mk II 1000, Lawson Replica ) we came across this high speed weaving that was caused by the bike following the front tyres centre line tread pattern, a similar one to the Diablo's. Not wanting to be rude, but just trying to find a solution, are the gents that are having this happen bigger riders in size than some of us. Even though this doesn't explain it happening with a 207rr though. ( unless it was badly cupped )

Andrew
09-22-2004, 08:56 AM
6'3", 220 lbs. Dunlop 207's, standard Tuono (03). Lots of shake at +125.

Scary
09-22-2004, 06:17 PM
Excuse me side tracking the thread, But it maybe worth checking the steering damper both in the mounting point & in the hydraulic side of it's operation for any slip spots in the push/pull of the rod or play in the mounting point to the frame it's self.
Excessive front wheel bearing side play can cause a high speed uneasiness/weaving too.

cornercarver
09-22-2004, 08:03 PM
Mine's done 145mph on US 50 without the slightest bit of headshake, and that was with soft luggage strapped on. I do have an Ohlins damper installed, though.

For those that care, I regularly ride with a GPS, and with a 180 Diablo on the back, my speedo is accurate within 1mph everywhere from 10mph to 130+mph. It is by far the most accurate speedo I have ever seen.

--sam

bluestreak
09-22-2004, 09:42 PM
Cornercarver

I believe it was Sport RIder that confirmed the Italian bike speedos were very accurate relative to the Jap bikes accuracy of 12-13% error on the high side indicating an actual higher speed than what the bike was traveling. I think that's piss poor. Give me accuracy!

Back to the head shack issue:
If the bike is machanically sound I look at the front end setup again. Maybe coincidental but, I haven't heard any of the Ohlin fork equiped bikes complaining about this problem. Ohlins have stiffer springs which will cause the front end to rider higher, all things being equal, that will slow steering and reduce to tendancy to head shake. The opposite would apply for a softer spring fork which drops the front and the additional weight of a heavyer rider would further increase the tendancy to shake because rake is decreased. Front end static sag should be checked to make sure it is not excessive.

Scary
09-22-2004, 10:29 PM
bluestreak...good point, can I ask you ,( or anyone else for that matter ) if the ohlins top triple tree has a steering stem clamping bolt in it as well as the though the top allen screw to hold it to the stem, or is it the same as the Std. Tuono tree, with only the top screw.

Scot p
09-22-2004, 10:47 PM
Originally posted by Andrew
6'3", 220 lbs. Dunlop 207's, standard Tuono (03). Lots of shake at +125.

Yep thats bigger that what sports bikes are designed for...

me...
5'9" 147 lbs :) , yes the tuono is fkn quick with me on board :)...

other points, the front end is oversprung for me(showa,preload wound all the way out),,, the rear shock is spot on(preload standard 1 click extra rebound)...

I have seen 242kmph, without a hickup, unfortunately the high beam is not realy strong enough for that type od speed at night so i chickened out while it was still pulling strong...

cya
Scot.

bluestreak
09-22-2004, 11:08 PM
Scary

My Ohlins top triple clamp has only the large allen fixture (top allen screw as you call it) to hold it down on the stem. It does not have a pinch bolt through the side of the clamp that would pinch it to the stem.

Scary
09-22-2004, 11:17 PM
bluestreak.... Bu$g$r ! I thought we may have been on to something for a second. We'll have to wait to see if the simple test I've PM'ed the gentlemen turns up anything. I was thinking maybe the top tree is torqued down onto a loose top locking stem nut thereby allowing the top tree to float on the thread/stem. If you get my drift. Thanks for the reply.

bluestreak
09-22-2004, 11:55 PM
Yea I know what you mean.

I have not had that area apart yet, but the drawings appear to have a conventional adjusting and lock rings under the top triple clamp to facilitate adjustment of the stem bearings. Then the top clamp is held in place by the large clamping screw torqued to 60 ft/lbs.

Exdukenut
09-23-2004, 12:16 AM
I'd be checking things like alignment first and foremost, steering geometry for the tyre profiles he's running. Also I'd take the front wheel out, and check for trueness of the wheel itself (maybe a long shot, I know). It may be that the riding style of the person is contributing to this effect. Grabbing the bars too tight. I'd also try adding some ride height at the rear, or lower the front by 1 ring and see what happens.

RinOz had major tank slappers when he ran a set of Michelin Race tyres on his Tuono R, @ arounf the 140kph mark. Almost sent him off into the bushes. He went back to some road tyres and all was well again.

I had major tank slapping at 200kph @ Phillip Island with a different brand of tyre on the back, DC on the front and a Brisgestone slick on the rear. Changed back to the DC on the rear and all was sweet again. I lowered the ride height and it improved to 220kph when it started to shake again at the front.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Sorry if any of this has been run through already, but I couldn't be bothered reading from the start on this thread.

:cool: