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RATMOUL
09-09-2016, 03:03 AM
316968
This is one of the latest fuel averages (4.6) that I got on a trip to Mt Baker in the Pacific NW USA. This was the average for a 120km trip going fairly easy riding with a newby rider who was going fairly conservatively (80- 100kph) on a nice twisty mountain road. I was happy with this result. Driving a bit more sportingly usually yields a result of 6 to 6.5 L/100km. The bike is running super sweetly.

Arek1
09-09-2016, 11:18 PM
You were riding downhill... ;), never got such nice fuel consumption. But i'll try :D. Easy riding =7,5, more agressive, or in heavy traffic =9,5 l/100km. Stock DD with Sport map.

RATMOUL
09-10-2016, 12:35 PM
Haha. Some minor up hill and some minor downhill. Not particularly trying for a milage record but was definitely easy cruising on a mountain road. I often see numbers like this on the "temp" page but got this one on the "average" page after a 120km trip, and noticed when checking/resetting at the fuel up. Bike has GPR pipes, air filter, updated ecu program and fatduc, and runs very sweetly. Pulls away slightly from my friend on his Multistada too which surprised me. He was two up and about 20kg heavier total that me, to be fair, but still! We will have another go with one each where I will be 25kg heavier than him and see. It seems that these two bikes might be closer in performance than weight and HP numbers suggest.

Arek1
09-10-2016, 01:05 PM
I'll have to upgrade my exhaust system, and remap ecu... Maybe after next season...
I also noticed that computer shows about one liter less fuel consumption then when it really is. After refuel I check amount of bunkered gasoline with my odo. 0,7 up to 1,1 more per 100 km.

RATMOUL
09-10-2016, 03:51 PM
I agree. The computer figure may be a bit optimistic compared to actual when calculated, but even if the "real" figure worked out to 5.6, that is still alright for a bike with this performance potential. The Fatduc and also the airfiltre upgrade might be just as important for performance as the pipes too. The ECU remap and the fatduc seem to be the ticket for decent fuel economy. T

Arek1
09-10-2016, 10:26 PM
So now i'm sure where my savings will go :D

LesRiskey
10-08-2016, 01:16 PM
I'll have to upgrade my exhaust system, and remap ecu... Maybe after next season...
I also noticed that computer shows about one liter less fuel consumption then when it really is. After refuel I check amount of bunkered gasoline with my odo. 0,7 up to 1,1 more per 100 km.

If you're not standing your bike up level when you fill the tank, it will take less gas than your manual says it will hold, so that will make a difference in your calculation.

On my Shiver, my average fuel consumption usually shows from 50 to 52 MPG (around 22 KPL), when I'm ripping the canyons at between 7,000 and 9,000 RPM consistently.

Commuting to work, where I rarely rev it over 6,000 RPM, I'm getting about 34MPG (14 KPL).

It seems that the engine is much more efficient at higher revs, or stopping at a few traffic lights sucks a lot more fuel than I'd imagine.

RATMOUL
11-01-2016, 07:06 AM
Hi. The calculation should be the same even with the bike on the sidestand as long as it is on the sidestand each time and you are on level ground.
As far as best economy, your bike and almost any other would get it's best economy at the lowest steady state speed that it would pull top gear without lugging. This would likely be at about 2500 rpm in top gear at a steady speed. No bike will get better fuel economy at 8000 rpm unless there is something seriously wrong with the AFR or ? at lower revs.
What you are probably experiencing is the huge difference between steady state cruising and stop and go traffic. It only takes a few hp to run a bike at 80 kph, but it takes many more to accelerate it to there.
Think of a bicycle and how much harder you have to pedal to start out compared to how hard you pedal for an easy cruise.
Every time you have to brake in stop and go traffic, you are also just converting forward stored energy which you have paid for in fuel, into heat and dissipating it via the brakes.
If you were to find a nice road where you could do a relatively steady state cruise in top gear you would likely find your best mileage ever. T