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View Full Version : New Caponord owner - detailed impressions



BruceWayne
08-07-2013, 10:10 PM
Hi everyone! I lurked in this forum a bit before going out and getting myself a new Caponord. As the bike is still new on the market, I thought it would be worthwhile to share my experiences on the Caponord so far. I traded in a 2008 Suzuki GSX-R 1000 so a lot of this will hopefully be helpful for anyone considering switching from a sportsbike as most reviews compare it to other adventure bikes. If anyone has any questions about life with the Capo, Iíll do my best to answer. I started looking for a different kind of bike as I hadnít been to a track day in ages and wanted something better suited to the reality of road riding. Age and the accumulation of injuries meant that I was no longer able to ride the Gixxer for long periods without being sore. I do like doing long days when I can but most of my trips on the bike are purely recreational trips for about 4 or 5 hours. I donít commute by bike nor was I interested in the off road capability being touted by many of the Capoís rivals. I test rode a Multistrada before deciding on the Capo so there Iíve compared the two a few times.

After hopping off your sportsbike the first thing you notice is that the Capo is heavy and it is tall. Although the seat height is up there, the way the shape tapers a bit toward the tank means that at 6ft I can slide towards the tank and get both heels on the groundÖ but only just. The taper makes it better than the Multistrada in this regard. It is a bit of a clichť but once you get rolling the weight disappears completely. Even crawling at parking lot speeds the Capo is very easy to handle. Indeed, the wide bars and tons of steering lock make it far, far easier to ride than a sportsbike in these conditions. I find backing the bike up whilst in the seat a bit uncomfortable but doable provided the surface is good. I have had to reverse it into a parking spot over loose, uneven ground and I did find that difficult. Iíve since taken to standing to the side whenever I need to walk the bike which has made life easier.

Without doubt, the Capo is the most comfortable bike Iíve ever ridden. Seating position is upright with your arms forward and a little high. I initially thought this might make your shoulders tired but after a few long days I can confirm this is not the case at all. The seat is just about perfect for me and I can remain in place for hours without getting sore. The bike doesnít lock you in place so you can move around a bit to shift your weight and positioning. After several hours of riding I still feel completely fresh, where I would have been stiff and sore had I been on the Gixxer.

The suspension is definitely awesome. The ADD really does work in such a way as to seem as though the suspensionís been specifically tuned to the piece of road you are on. Bumps are minimized and big jolts non-existent. You still feel the road though, the surface communicates through the suspension just as you need it to, giving you feel and confidence. On smooth roads it handles perfectly, turning in quickly and tracking smoothly. Add bumps and corrugations and it still handles well. Even on the worst bits of road Iíve encountered so far (road may be too kind a term to use here) you never feel like the Capo is out of control. In these conditions a sportsbike would be bucking, bouncing and beating you up, making every effort to destroy your throttle control. Mid corner bumps will affect the bike but the trick suspension seems to keep this to an absolute minimum. Any sportsbike rider is familiar with the feeling of their vertebrae being smashed together by hard jolts through the rear, on the Capo this never happens. Bear in mind the suspension doesnít feel different, you donít feel it working. The thing is it feels just like a normal bike, only tuned for the piece of road youíre on.

Plenty of leverage is available through the wide bars and it is easy to turn in pretty quickly, with no need to muscle it. With the panniers off and the exhaust in the high position, thereís a fair bit of lean angle available before the centrestand touches down. Bear in mind that Iím not Valentino Rossi and Iím sure youíd find the lean angle restrictive if you took it into the track environment. For me, it is enough for the road. Side to side transitions are the most noticeable difference from a sportsbike. Where you can still tip the Capo into a corner fairly fast, a quick transition from high lean on one side to high lean on the other makes it apparent that youíre not on a sportsbike. On the road it is not a huge concern.

The engine does have a fairly traditional V twin feel to it. Once it is fully warmed up, it is happy providing good low range tractability. You can move at some pretty low speeds without the need to reach for the clutch lever. Up top though it is a bit breathless, youíll usually short shift and keep it in the midrange rather than try and rev it out. In the time Iíve had it the engine has loosened up and is happier to have a rev but Iím doubtful that thereís too much more to come. Ducati and KTM both produce 1200cc twins for similarly purposed bikes that make 150hp. That extra 20hp along with a revvier nature would make the Capo a lot better in my opinion, I certainly think that the chassis would be happy to handle it. Once Iíd familiarized myself with how to shift the engine modes, I just left it in Sport. Aside from during the most horrendous downpours, that is where it will probably stay.

The stock pipe is fairly quiet, certainly there are a lot of current bikes that have louder setups off the floor. At tickover it gives a fairly standard twin sound and doesnít have a great deal of character. Once you give it a handful that changes and it rises to a pretty nice tone. Certainly sounds the business bouncing off rockfaces as you wind through valleys. For those of you holding the Ďloud pipes save livesí belief, I definitely do notice that people are more likely to try and merge over you the quieter your bike sounds.

con't

dsgfh
08-08-2013, 12:43 AM
Sounds like you & I are coming across to the ADV segment for very similar reasons. Welcome aboard.

BruceWayne
08-08-2013, 02:04 AM
Thanks for the welcome dsgfh! I'll try posting the rest again below as there seems to have been a problem first time around.

The gearbox deserves special mention. Smooth, buttery - insert your favourite adjective, the Capoís box is great. Iíve never had a missed shift, nor had any trouble finding neutral and it always has a nice, positive feel to changes. Even when moving into first after sitting in neutral the clunk is pretty minimal. On a brand new bike, thatís all pretty amazing. The clutch is nice and progressive too and gives you a good feel. It has an adjustable span, so unless your hands are tiny you should be able to find a comfortable setting. With the low end of the twin, you certainly donít have to ride the clutch the same way you would on a sportsbike at low speeds, making such maneuvering a lot easier.

For me, the mirrors are a revelation. You donít have to contort yourself to view them and, when you flick your eyes to check them, the images are crisp, clear and unaffected by vibration. Compared to the Gixxer it is like the difference between reading bold print and deciphering hieroglyphs. I honestly donít know why some manufacturers get this so wrong when obviously it can be done right.

The dash is informative and layout is pretty good. The screen works very well, even with sun reflecting directly off it the display remains legible as long as you have sunglasses or a tinted visor on. In fact, the idiot lights are more likely to be obscured by sun than the rest of the dash. The ability to flick through the different display modes from the handlebar is pretty handy, I often want to go between clock and trip meter so it is nice not to have to take your left hand from the bars to do so. Having a fuel gauge (not just a warning light) is another one of those little touches that make life easier. It also displays the selected settings for the heated grips, ABS, traction control and suspension. My only (very minor) quibble with the dash is that Iíd prefer engine temps to be represented numerically rather than with a bar layout, perhaps Aprilia thought there were already enough numbers on the screen.

It is simple to switch between the engine mappings on the fly. You simply tap the starter button to cycle through them and then roll off the throttle. Adjusting the ABS, traction control and suspension settings requires you to be stopped. It is a simple sequence using the buttons next to the dash Ė button B cycles through the functions with button A adjusting the values. It would be awesome if you could assign settings to engine control modes like on the Multistrada Ė eg sport has traction control at level 1 and rain has level 3 and you just switch through using the starter button. Guess we canít have everythingÖ

Iíve been riding with traction control on level 1 (least intervention) and Iím pretty sure Iíve not activated it as yet. For me thatís a good sign that it is not too intent to intrude on fun. It also means I canít give you much feedback on the system. Likewise, I donít have much to say for the ABS. Iíve had one hard stop when a car pulled out in front of me but I was able to shed enough speed without (I believe at least) the ABS needing to trigger. The stock tires are actually pretty good and deserve credit for you being able to push the bike a bit without the need for electronic nanny systems. While I am more than happy to have them as an insurance policy, especially when conditions are poor, the Capo would probably have been fine without the traction control component.

Having been caught in one unexpected bit of moderate rain I can say that the bike provides decent weather protection for your legs and torso. With the bars setting your arms a bit wide, they will get wet. It is winter here in Australia and Iíve been riding with the screen in the highest position. This has provided me with pretty good protection from the cold. Iíve got heated grips on order and, thanks to the combination of the Capoís hand guards and a good pair of winter gloves, thereís only been a few rides where I really felt I needed them. Definitely a great bike for colder climes. Hopefully lowering the screen will be enough to keep me comfortable in the Aussie summer heat.

Iíve ridden a few times in relatively strong winds. It is hard to judge but Iíd say the effect of crosswinds is fairly similar to the Gixxer. The difference would seem to be that the Gixxer seemed a little twitchier when hit by crosswinds.

Iíve not really used the panniers much (in fact theyíve rarely been on the bike) but they seem to work relatively well and the rain Iíve faced so far hasnít exposed any leaks (I see on this forum that others have had issues). Iíve got a top box on order which I intend to use as a backrest for my pillion when I go riding with her.

One gripe I have is that the indicator cancel button doesnít have a positive feel to it. Iíve hit it a couple of times without cancelling the indicators because of the lack of tactile feedback it provides. Another aspect of the controls that could be better is the cruise control. The button is on the right handlebar, meaning it can be a bit awkward to actually set this at the right speed. Iíve only tried it a couple of times so it might be ok once Iím used to it.

The underseat storage is miniscule. The small tool kit provided by Aprilia takes up almost all the space, I couldnít even fit my puncture repair kit in there with it. It is a bit of a concern as I intend to have the panniers off the bike most of the time. It is a good thing the fuelling is done well, youíd have no chance of fitting a Power Commander in there.

So how does it feel after a sportsbike? For me it has made me a lot more relaxed. Moving through urban areas or stuck behind other traffic on country roads I used to get frustrated on the Gixxer, wanting to get out of the situation asap. With the Capo, Iím comfortable and happy to wait until an opportunity presents itself to have a blast. The reality is that I, like many sportsbike riders, rarely used the bike close to its maximum capabilities on the street. With the Capo, I find I do push the bikeís capabilities a lot more which results in the actual performance being not too different from what Iíd have seen on the Gixxer a lot of the time. I do miss the heady rush of a 4 cylinder revving its head off and the slower acceleration does mean you need to plot your overtakes more carefully than you would on the Gixxer. To sum it up one way the thrill of a sportsbike is the ability to go astonishingly quickly whilst keeping more in reserve. On the Capo it becomes more the thrill of pushing a bike close to its limits.

I donít think I will move back to a sportsbike on the road, the Capo has made life too pleasant while still delivering on most of the excitement. If I decided to do track days once more, I would not use the Capo. In that environment I think its performance shortfall would become frustrating but letís face it, no one should be looking at this for a track special. When the conditions are just right Ė good quality twisty roads ahead of you, clear skies above you and no traffic separating you from your destination nothing beats a well sorted sportsbike. For real life, Iíll choose the Caponord.

tomo
08-08-2013, 02:20 AM
Thanks for the review BW. I have a question for you, and anyone else: I took a short test ride on the new Capo, starting off in sport mode and found it very snatchy to the extent that I changed it as soon as I could. (I am comparing it to the current Capo.) What's your experience of sport mode, especially coming off a GSX?

Unfortunately, as the ride was in a group I didn't have the opportunity to stop again to get it out of rain mode and try touring.

BruceWayne
08-08-2013, 02:35 AM
Coming from a GSX-R, I don't find sport mode snatchy. I've heard a few people say the same thing as you but to me there's not an issue. I always rode the Gixxer in the 'full power' map (except in heavy downpours) so I'm used to having a very responsive throttle. In fact the Capo is less responsive. I've not really spent any time in touring mode to comment on the difference but if I remember I'll give it a go and get back to you Tomo.

Stef.
08-08-2013, 02:48 AM
Great review Bruce see you on the road

Msimpkin
08-09-2013, 01:53 AM
Hey Tomo, i've only had my Capo for a week now, i find touring mode the best for general fast riding, but you do need to have it in sport when i'm chasing my lunatic friends. I agree with Bruce with what he says. My last bike was the B-King, so i do miss that outright speed. But the Capo is way more confortable, with much better proctection.

BruceWayne
08-11-2013, 04:52 PM
For anyone who is interested, I removed the huge flat plastic bits on the license plate mount. I used a piece of aluminium to mount the plate to the existing structure that sits behind the flat plastic. I think it makes it look a lot nicer without the need to pay for the expensive fender eliminator kit. End results are below.

229181

DodgyGeezer
08-15-2013, 04:18 PM
Hi Tomo. Just got back from a week's touring in Scotland. Now done 2k miles on the new Capo.
I first looked at Crescent in Verwood, but they didn't seem that clued up. I know it's a new bike, but even so... they didn't even know how to change between riding modes. I had to go online, find the Aprilia downloads, and find out for myself, then go back for another test ride. As Crescent quoted a 6 week delay, I ended up buying from SP in Exeter, who were brilliant.
You don't have to stop to change modes. Press the starter button to cycle between modes, then close throttle to confirm. I use Touring 90% of the time. When in a terrific downpour, I used the Rain mode, which softened everything, and I found that brilliant. Occasionally, when the terrors come over me, I switch to Sport mode, and I'm sure it sharpens up responses, although part of this may be psychological.
Let us know if you decide to get one.

BruceWayne
08-16-2013, 01:20 AM
Hey Tomo, I gave touring mode a try today. I was actually impressed, it is a bit more relaxed and smoother without feeling like the bike's been neutered. I think I'll actually end up using this for urban riding from now on. Response to the throttle is just a little bit slower and I think it may be what you're after. Bear in mind I don't have the new maps on my bike as yet so don't know what difference they would make.

I've got the heated grips and top box fitted now. Heated grips work fine. Having a nice interface on the screen and stock button makes it pretty slick and easy to use. I ended up using level 1 for part of my ride yesterday which kept me nice and comfy at around 11 degree celsius ambient temps. Tried 2 briefly and started sweating pretty quickly. Presumably 3 is reserved for arctic temps or cooking :) Note when fitting - the grips only come on above 2000 rpm. I think this is great as it saves the battery and you don't need them on if you're stopped anyway but could definitely confuse you when you're trying them out for the first time.

I'm happy with the top box too. There were a few elements of the fit and finish (namely the metal mounting plate and bits of the black plastic) that I thought weren't great but I was able to clean these up myself and all looks perfect now so I guess no harm done. It is a pretty good system and looks very good in the way it matches the paint and upholstery of the bike. The plastic mounting plate spoils the look of the bike's rear when the box is off but any top box will be the same.

I'm still very happy with the bike. Definitely want more power though :devil: why oh why couldn't Aprilia give us 150 horsies like on the Multistrada.

ChrisHall
08-16-2013, 04:55 AM
Note when fitting - the grips only come on above 2000 rpm. I think this is great as it saves the battery and you don't need them on if you're stopped anyway but could definitely confuse you when you're trying them out for the first time.

This confused the mechanic who fitted my grips, he wasted about 1 hour trying to get them to work, until I told him about the 2000 rpm needed to activate them!

nisbeam
08-16-2013, 06:53 AM
:funnypost

Andybow
08-16-2013, 04:41 PM
Great review!
tested the capo a couple of weeks ago! Love it, thanks for the review. I have come from sports bikes as well, selling my fireblade, last march and getting a new speed triple, which I love! But I would like something that ticks all boxes for touring, sporty etc etc. tested the multi gt and for the money I thought the caponord was far better value and riding experience. I have used SP in Exeter for years and am really good friends with them, so it's a no brainier for me that they are a main dealer for aprilia.hopefully if I can I will keep my speed and then have the caponord for longer rides.

BruceWayne
08-16-2013, 09:27 PM
A Capo and a speed triple would be a pretty killer combo Andy, enjoy!

Andybow
08-17-2013, 02:21 PM
A Capo and a speed triple would be a pretty killer combo Andy, enjoy!
I pretty sure it would be the perfect combo for me!

Mr Pope
08-18-2013, 01:36 AM
I've been waiting for Crescent in Verwood to get me the oil filter changed for the past 2 weeks - maybe Italy is closed until September but would it really take that long (unless, as I suspect, Crescent are completely feckin' useless) :deadhorse:

nisbeam
08-18-2013, 02:50 AM
Mr Pope that is interesting because I use them as well. Their Aprilia mechanic Jim is very experienced as are some of the other guys in the workshop. They support the racing team so they would be wouldn't they. I think the hold up may be at the management level, they can only work as instructed.

I reported my pannier falling off, with pictures etc. weeks ago now but they seem to be reluctant to report it back to Aprilia (Piaggio). I mentioned my leaking panniers and they asked for pictures of the leaks ... :WTF: so I had sort of given up until I was told that there are some panniers that do not leak !

I think it's time to complain a bit more strongly :ginger:.

Markprend
08-18-2013, 05:13 PM
My panniers were warped and leaked and they have agreed to replace them

Mr Pope
08-19-2013, 02:07 AM
Mr Pope that is interesting because I use them as well. Their Aprilia mechanic Jim is very experienced as are some of the other guys in the workshop. They support the racing team so they would be wouldn't they. I think the hold up may be at the management level, they can only work as instructed.

I reported my pannier falling off, with pictures etc. weeks ago now but they seem to be reluctant to report it back to Aprilia (Piaggio). I mentioned my leaking panniers and they asked for pictures of the leaks ... :WTF: so I had sort of given up until I was told that there are some panniers that do not leak !

I think it's time to complain a bit more strongly :ginger:.

I actually bought the bike in Peterboro' because of the useless sales staff in Soton not knowing anything about the Capo whatsoever! I'll be badgering them at 9.05 this morning (so they have time to get their first sip of coffee before I get to them) :devil:

ChrisHall
08-19-2013, 07:45 AM
Finding a good dealer does seem to be hard work!

On the downside, I have had the service department

- Failed to check the coolant level
- Overfilled the engine oil by using the wrong procedure
- Didn't understand the Aprilia alarm function flashing the tailight
- Failed to secure the alarm properly after the replacing the rear shock under warranty
- Failed to read the manual on how to test the heated grips.
- Failed to check the tightness of various components which subsequently fell off
- Told me that the engine cut-out/misfire experienced at altitude (8,000 ft) was the traction control cutting in :WTF:, (set at level 2).
- They managed to burn out their USB lead for connecting the bike to the computer for the latest update. (Bike is still with them, waiting a new lead).

On the upside they have been very helpful with a loan bike (A Caponord) and warranty claims. And the mechanic managed to get the oil filter off without having to remove the ABS control unit (as is descibed in the service manual). 1st Service still cost me £220!

I am seriously considering using the independent mechanic I've used for my other bike for the past 25 years. It's just the warranty validity that hold's me back at the moment. Do I really want the dealer doing the valve clearances when they can't get even the simple stuff right!

nisbeam
08-19-2013, 08:42 AM
I wouldn't let them touch it again. There must be another dealer you can go to !

Mr Pope
08-20-2013, 02:04 AM
Which stealer was it Chris... surely not Crescent???

nisbeam
08-20-2013, 03:05 AM
Ha Ha - not Crescent at Verwood, their Aprilia mechanic is very good or I would let him look at my bike. I've had too many 'technicians' bugger things up in the past to take a chance. It sounds as though the Southampton lot are quite different. (Mind you never sure about salesmen wherever they are).

ChrisHall
08-20-2013, 04:32 AM
I'll reply with the dealer's name when I get my bike back.

The other option I have is to use On-Yer-Bike at Aylesbury. Anyone have experience of them??

DodgyGeezer
08-22-2013, 02:41 PM
Sold my Speed Triple a couple of years ago, and wish I hadn't. Brilliant bike. But not ideal riding position for long trips (although I did Scotland in a day). Capo is slower, but so much more comfortable, a great tourer.230042

Nolz
10-10-2013, 05:39 AM
Thanks for the write up, I registered so that I could thank you for putting up your impressions. I've got mine coming in a few weeks and now having read what you've had to say, I'm now even more impatient!

BigSteve
10-10-2013, 08:08 AM
I'll reply with the dealer's name when I get my bike back.

The other option I have is to use On-Yer-Bike at Aylesbury. Anyone have experience of them??

Yes Chris, I purchased my ETV1000 Capo from them in 2003 very good from what I can remember, back then the 1st service was free as I got them to make it part of the deal.... :D

After the warrantee expired I have done all servicing mods etc myself (apart from down loading the catfish map, GH_Services did this :D) & saved thousands over the years...:banana:

BigSteve
10-10-2013, 08:27 AM
Sold my Speed Triple a couple of years ago, and wish I hadn't. Brilliant bike. But not ideal riding position for long trips (although I did Scotland in a day). Capo is slower, but so much more comfortable, a great tourer.230042

Your old Triumph looks the dogs danglies...I must take one for a ride one day, a future classic I'm sure...:D

ChrisHall
10-10-2013, 08:30 AM
The dealer was Palmers at Hemel Hempstead.

BigSteve
10-10-2013, 09:09 AM
I am seriously considering using the independent mechanic I've used for my other bike for the past 25 years. It's just the warranty validity that hold's me back at the moment. Do I really want the dealer doing the valve clearances when they can't get even the simple stuff right!

I would use a good independent Chris, a few of us with the original Capo use GH_Services in Watford .....http://www.apriliaforum.com/forums/member.php?48292-GH_services.....(Grant is the mechanic, he has re-mapped most of the 1000 forums bikes, he has fitted the full blown RSV-R motor 125bhp into his Capo)...send him a PM, I'm sure if he can get hold of the service data sheets etc he will be able to help, or recommend someone good in the trade that can.

:cheers:

ChrisHall
10-10-2013, 10:54 AM
I'll contact him for the next service.

I had the oil catch tank recall done last week at Palmers. When I removed the rider seat, part of the loom is routed incorrectly!. :WTF:

Also I changed the oil yesterday. The sump plug was done up TIGHT. Manual says 19NM. This was more like 40NM. :WTF:

BigSteve
10-10-2013, 11:16 AM
I'll contact him for the next service.



He is an honest hard working chap, reasonable rates..not like most dealers..:rolleyes:....here is Grant's workshop & pics of him hard at work on a couple of Capo's last year....he even lets you make tea or coffee, provided you buy him some biscuits...:lol:

233759
233760
233761
233762
233763

RSTman
10-10-2013, 11:31 AM
I had my first service done at AandD Motorcycles (supplying dealer) in Denbigh last Friday. Not over joyed.

The invoice says 10W40 oil has been used rather than 15W50 as specified by Aprilia. I see today that the service manual says remove the ABS modulator to change the oil filter! Does anyone know if the filter can be removed replace without doing this? Looking around the bike it looks like the dealer may have forced some of the brake pipes to get access, possibly avoiding ABS removal. Will have a closer look tonight.

The other minus is that I had no oil leaking from the airbox before, and now, within 100 miles of the service oil is leaking out around the little sump tube at the bottom of the airbox. Pulled it off (it pretty much dropped off) and drained the airbox last night. Before the oil change the oil level was in the bottom half of the sight glass, now it's right at the top. I'm sure this, combined with revving the engine higher has caused oil to be forced into the airbox. This was a common issue on the Futura and happened if you filled the oil tank towards the max level.

Plus point, cost of £107 seems reasonable.

The only bike maintenance I've paid for that was any good was from and independent Aprilia specialist in Tamworth. Dealer workshops are to be avoided if poss in my experience. Unfortunately with the electronic kit required do do some things today it's becoming unavoidable in some instances.

nisbeam
10-10-2013, 11:57 AM
RSTman, sounds as though your bike should have the recall fix for the catch tank, since mine was done no oil at all for 3000 miles in the air box or the little drain pipe. Yes you have to remove (well loosten not actually disconnect) the ABS modulator - bit of bad design perhaps, make the job a pita. The oil is probably the most important part I think it's important to get it right for long engine life, I would take it back & ask them to do it properly using the correct grade & let Aprilia know if they don't as they don't deserve to be an approved dealer. Second thoughts if they bent stuff to get the filter off maybe avoid them anyway in future.

Chris - yes I was warned about the sump plug by mechanic - because it has a big head it is liable to people over tightening, but the bolt itself is fairly small, so took care when I did my interim oil change at 6000 miles. RSTman - I hope your isn't overtightened, but I wouldn't hold my breath.:(

ChrisHall
10-10-2013, 12:49 PM
Yes, I just loosened the ABS modulator. You actually only need a few extra mm to get the oil filter off (thanks Aprilia) - One of those rubber strap wrenches is handy for removing the filter. My first service was £227 (although that did included an extra litre of oil for top up), so £107 seems very reasonable. The oil is going to be £50 at least unless they've used some Duckhams Q they had lying around :eek:.

Labour: 1.83 Hrs £118.95
Oil filter: £10.00
4 Litres of Motul 300V £12.98**
1 litre of Motul 5100 £ 8.32*

VAT £37.84

*Cock up in my favour, 300V supplied charged for 5100 (Small victory)

** oil over filled, only needs about 3.35 litres with a filter change so over-charged (lost damn it!)

BigSteve
10-10-2013, 01:04 PM
The invoice says 10W40 oil has been used rather than 15W50 as specified by Aprilia......

The other minus is that I had no oil leaking from the airbox before, and now, within 100 miles of the service oil is leaking out around the little sump tube at the bottom of the airbox. Pulled it off (it pretty much dropped off) and drained the airbox last night. Before the oil change the oil level was in the bottom half of the sight glass, now it's right at the top. I'm sure this, combined with revving the engine higher has caused oil to be forced into the airbox. This was a common issue on the Futura and happened if you filled the oil tank towards the max level.

Plus point, cost of £107 seems reasonable. :eek: using the wrong oil this is probably why it was cheap

Unfortunately with the electronic kit required do do some things today it's becoming unavoidable in some instances.

Bikes are going like cars, almost imposible to service yourself without the very expensive test equipment that needs re-calibrating every few months...



Servicing is one of the reasons I havn't upgraded to a newer bike yet...:rolleyes: though I probably will when i find one with all the issues sorted & the price is reduced to what I can afford....circa sub £8,000 as I want to keep the bikes I have already aswell..:rolleyes:

When I first started reading all the test reports on the new techno bikes...servicing cost or for that matter mpg is hardly ever mentioned...:(

Thanks to this great forum, I can fix just about anything on my old Capo...spares are cheap as chips as the original Capo wasn't a bike that flew out of the showrooms...so demand is not high..:D ......I even have a low mileage Rotax engine sitting in the corner of my Batcave, purchased from a fellow forum member for only £250.... though I doubt if i'll need to fit it as the V60 is vertually indistructable in the 100 bhp detuned state...:D

All servicing consumables etc can be found at any local motor factor or good old flea-bay & several original Capo's are using japanese electric parts including rectifiers & connectors which as many of you will know are the weak points of most Italian bikes...:rolleyes:

RSTman
10-10-2013, 04:55 PM
RSTman, sounds as though your bike should have the recall fix for the catch tank, since mine was done no oil at all for 3000 miles in the air box or the little drain pipe. Yes you have to remove (well loosten not actually disconnect) the ABS modulator - bit of bad design perhaps, make the job a pita. The oil is probably the most important part I think it's important to get it right for long engine life, I would take it back & ask them to do it properly using the correct grade & let Aprilia know if they don't as they don't deserve to be an approved dealer. Second thoughts if they bent stuff to get the filter off maybe avoid them anyway in future.

Chris - yes I was warned about the sump plug by mechanic - because it has a big head it is liable to people over tightening, but the bolt itself is fairly small, so took care when I did my interim oil change at 6000 miles. RSTman - I hope your isn't overtightened, but I wouldn't hold my breath.:(



I won't be going back to the dealer unless I have to. The oil in the airbox mod confuses me. What exactly is the mod? Some have said it's extra gauze to soak up the oil. Unless this is located in the breather from the engine oil will still eventually fill the bottom of the airbox. The only way to get it out is to remove the sump pipe or open the airbox and mop it up. I have made and fitted a much longer sump tube so I will see how I get on with that before I consider going back to the dealer.

I am annoyed with AandD because I asked that any applicable Aprilia issued mods were done before I collected the bike. I'm reluctant to go back since it's another day off work and a 150 mile round trip.

BruceWayne
10-10-2013, 05:18 PM
Thanks for the write up, I registered so that I could thank you for putting up your impressions. I've got mine coming in a few weeks and now having read what you've had to say, I'm now even more impatient!

Glad it helped Nolz! This forum was invaluable for me in making the decision to take the plunge, as well as helping once I had the bike. Great to add yet another Sydney-sider to the group.

Strawb
10-10-2013, 06:24 PM
Thanks for the write up, I registered so that I could thank you for putting up your impressions. I've got mine coming in a few weeks and now having read what you've had to say, I'm now even more impatient!

+1 I am new to this forum but have been lurking. I downsized from an R1200GS to an F700gs last year. The 12gs was too top heavy, one of the reasons for downsizing. Tested a Capo a couple of weeks ago and just had to have one. The bugger is waiting until Jan 14!

Like Nolz, reading all this stuff is just making me more impatient

fredaroony
10-10-2013, 10:06 PM
+1 I am new to this forum but have been lurking. I downsized from an R1200GS to an F700gs last year. The 12gs was too top heavy, one of the reasons for downsizing. Tested a Capo a couple of weeks ago and just had to have one. The bugger is waiting until Jan 14!

Like Nolz, reading all this stuff is just making me more impatient


You found the Capo less top heavy than the 1200GS?

Strawb
10-10-2013, 10:36 PM
You found the Capo less top heavy than the 1200GS?


Yes, I have had three of them, the first in 2005 (stock), the second in 2008 which I lowered by 60mm with Wilbers shocks (fixed the top heaviness and made it handle much better). I don't do much dirt riding. The third one was a 2011, twin cam which was already factory lowered but was still top heavy. Then I rode the Capo which was about the same as the 2008 model gs in the top heavy department but it had absoultely amazing suspension, power, engine maps, panniers as stock etc. It is the easiest bike to ride fast, particularly on crap roads. The other thing I was after was a 17" front wheel. I had a K1600GT in between the second and third gs's. It had an amazingly quick steering for such a monster of a thing with its smaller front wheel. The is a certain similarity between the feel of that bike in the front end and the Capo

Mr Pope
10-11-2013, 02:13 AM
Servicing is one of the reasons I havn't upgraded to a newer bike yet...:rolleyes: though I probably will when i find one with all the issues sorted & the price is reduced to what I can afford....circa sub £8,000 as I want to keep the bikes I have already aswell..:rolleyes:

When I first started reading all the test reports on the new techno bikes...servicing cost or for that matter mpg is hardly ever mentioned...:(

Thanks to this great forum, I can fix just about anything on my old Capo...spares are cheap as chips as the original Capo wasn't a bike that flew out of the showrooms...so demand is not high..:D ......I even have a low mileage Rotax engine sitting in the corner of my Batcave, purchased from a fellow forum member for only £250.... though I doubt if i'll need to fit it as the V60 is vertually indistructable in the 100 bhp detuned state...:D

All servicing consumables etc can be found at any local motor factor or good old flea-bay & several original Capo's are using japanese electric parts including rectifiers & connectors which as many of you will know are the weak points of most Italian bikes...:rolleyes:

As I've said on here and elsewhere, the mpg is not a problem (well on mine anyway). Set to the legal limit (honest), it'll do 55-60 to the gallon, with spirited riding, around half that - FFS this is a bike which should be enjoyed not worry about the cost!

BigSteve
10-11-2013, 03:29 AM
As I've said on here and elsewhere, the mpg is not a problem (well on mine anyway). Set to the legal limit (honest), it'll do 55-60 to the gallon, with spirited riding, around half that - FFS this is a bike which should be enjoyed not worry about the cost!

Thats the problem...I still enjoy riding my other 2 bikes too much & don't want to give them up just yet.. shouldn't they be enjoyed aswell.....if I was going to get rid of them then I could afford a new Capo & fix any of the issues now...BUT IMO I don't think the new Capo 1200 is worth me selling my old bikes for just yet...:rolleyes: One day, perhaps in 6 months if I can save enough I can see the new Capo joining them in my Batcave...:D

The cost of fuel isn't the issue even though both my current bike return 50 mpg + even when making good progress..;)

You are obvously fortunate to be in the position as to not have to worry about such mundane things...:confused:.. & I know where you are coming from....but I have to budget my resources in order to get the most buck from my motorcycling....:rolleyes:

Mr Pope
10-11-2013, 09:16 AM
I agree, so do I but, having sold a bike that, in reality, was getting past my knowledge (mind you opening a can of beans seems to be getting more difficult) I felt that something cutting edge would do the trick. I lost £2k on my last bike between buying it new and putting 28k miles on it so that was good enough for me...

Mind you, having seen the secondhand Cap12's on various sited selling for less than 10 grand, I know it's not going to happen this time! It will, however, be ragged mercilessly until I decide to change it in a decade or so

BigSteve
10-11-2013, 10:29 AM
Then you'll be like me...you'll have owned it for 10+ years you won't want to sell it...:lol:

RSTman
10-11-2013, 11:07 AM
Then you'll be like me...you'll have owned it for 10+ years you won't want to sell it...:lol:

I know what you mean. I didn't want to sell my Futura after owning it from new for 5 years. Unfortunately my body hasn't worn as well and is past dealing with the sports tourer riding position after a day in the saddle. Finding a bike as good since has been hard but I'm hoping that the Capo1200 is it.

If you're still happy with the ETV Capo and it's in good shape, I think you're right to wait a while and see how the new Capo shakes down. The Rotax 990 is one of the best bike engines ever IMO and, as you say, all the maintenance stuff is now well catered for and pretty much DIYable.

Although the current tackle is no where near as DIY friendly there are bound to be some work arounds given time and experience.

keithc
10-11-2013, 12:08 PM
Like others I am keeping bikes I have owned for a while (OK the 1500 has been in my mancave for 16 years so far) and I dont see seeling them anytime soon. I did sell a 2010 Suzuki Vstrom 650 to get teh 1200 Cap, and lost nearly £2 doing so as it had 17500 miles on it. Not sure I will do the same sort of mileage on the 1200 though, not with a £800 24000 miles service :)
Still having fun on all my bikes and looking forward to after the 600 service is done tomorrow so I can feel what difference the restriction on it.

Keith C

BigSteve
10-11-2013, 01:58 PM
If you're still happy with the ETV Capo and it's in good shape, I think you're right to wait a while and see how the new Capo shakes down. The Rotax 990 is one of the best bike engines ever IMO and, as you say, all the maintenance stuff is now well catered for and pretty much DIYable.

Although the current tackle is no where near as DIY friendly there are bound to be some work arounds given time and experience.

Still extremely happy with the 1000 Capo...after 10.5 years & nearly 40,000 miles it still ticks all the boxes for me...:banana:


Like others I am keeping bikes I have owned for a while (OK the 1500 has been in my mancave for 16 years so far) and I dont see seeling them anytime soon. I did sell a 2010 Suzuki Vstrom 650 to get teh 1200 Cap, and lost nearly £2 doing so as it had 17500 miles on it. Not sure I will do the same sort of mileage on the 1200 though, not with a £800 24000 miles service :)
Still having fun on all my bikes and looking forward to after the 600 service is done tomorrow so I can feel what difference the restriction on it.

Keith C

Thanks for your comments guy's...perhaps in hindsight the worse thing did was take the new 1200 out for a test ride...:rolleyes:.....like the original Capo it is flawed, but that just makes me want more...the Capo's have that certain something that many of the other bikes don't...it has character by the bucket load...:banana:

Perhaps next year they will change the colours & make a Blue one....:D

Mr Pope
10-12-2013, 01:55 AM
Then you'll be like me...you'll have owned it for 10+ years you won't want to sell it...:lol:

Nah, bikes are like houses - just a means to an end I'm afraid. I have only ever had one bike and have no real desire to own more than one at a time, don't see the point. Nostalgia doesn't come into the ideal either I'm afraid, I don't get all droolley about old bikes as the world has moved on

RSTman
10-12-2013, 02:32 PM
Perhaps next year they will change the colours & make a Blue one....:D

My 04 Futura was infinity blue, great colour looked fantastic but not easy to keep clean. Never an issue for me, always willing to waste hours cleaning and polishing motor bikes :lover:

BigSteve
10-12-2013, 03:12 PM
always willing to waste hours cleaning and polishing motor bikes :lover:

Yeah I have that OCD condition aswell....only cleaning bikes or cars though.....:lol:

BruceWayne
11-24-2013, 06:06 PM
So I thought I'd post a bit of an update now that I've had the Capo for a fair while. I'm still quite happy with it and no regrets about the purchase.

Although I've not been through any truly horrific downpours, I've not had any issues with panniers leaking. I've seen a tiny bit of oil on the fork leg but, based on feedback here, haven't been concerned by this.

Since the original posts in this thread, I've had the new maps loaded and changed to a 16 tooth front sprocket. It isn't a significant difference but I think the new suspension map does a better job of smoothing out very corrugated surfaces. Between the gearing and remap, it is nicer to run at low speeds and the amount of clutch required is minimal. The change in gearing is an improvement I'd recommend but, in an ideal world, I'd have the higher gears a bit closer to stock gearing.

Now we've seen some hot weather here in Oz, I can confirm that the heat that comes from the right hand side beneath the seat is really annoying but only an issue in traffic. Keeping your right foot on the peg in stop/start helps a bit but you still feel it.

I still find the indicator annoying as hell. Thousands of Kms later, I'm still not used to its awkwardness and have to double check that I've actually cancelled it. Same with the cruise control, I've joined the left hand activation club for those rare occasions I actually use it.

Hope all the owners are having as much fun as I am with their rides!

keithc
11-24-2013, 08:23 PM
Got to agree that the indicator needs checking. But not to worry as it does self cancel after a bit. Just not quick enough and like the cruise control isn't the best out their. My old 1500 has much more efficient self cancelling indicators and cruise control and its over 20 years older.

I am wondering what the heat on the right hand side of the bike is that you refer to. An explanation would be useful.

Still not to worry, I am still impressed wit my Capo, lets see how it fairs after a UK winter. Mine is all ACF50'd up now in preparation for it :)

Keith C

BruceWayne
11-27-2013, 03:48 PM
To be honest Keith, the heat thing isn't that bad, just 34 degree C weather tends to make you notice anything like that! On the Capo, the heat coming from the engine appears to be focused on the right hand side. Not uncommon on bikes for heat to be focused like this of course but my last one had an 'all over sauna effect' so I've noticed the difference.

mason.planft
11-27-2013, 04:17 PM
To be honest Keith, the heat thing isn't that bad, just 34 degree C weather tends to make you notice anything like that! On the Capo, the heat coming from the engine appears to be focused on the right hand side. Not uncommon on bikes for heat to be focused like this of course but my last one had an 'all over sauna effect' so I've noticed the difference.

I know that feeling Bruce, I used to live in Western Sydney. I had an air cooled Yamaha MT-01. Parramatta Rd + peak hour traffic
+ 40 deg C was nasty! I did a lot of 'lane filtering' to stay cool and not drop dead from heat stroke!

I do wish I could have kept nearly all of my past bikes. They all had at least one endearing trait that I loved them for. I loved them all, right up to the moment where I'd have an innocent test ride, then found that I NEEDED to own whatever it was. I did manage to use some self control and over-rule my lust after I test rode a 2011 Yamaha V-Max. Man I wanted that bike badly!

AussieMat
11-27-2013, 09:25 PM
I do wish I could have kept nearly all of my past bikes. They all had at least one endearing trait that I loved them for. I loved them all, right up to the moment where I'd have an innocent test ride, then found that I NEEDED to own whatever it was. I did manage to use some self control and over-rule my lust after I test rode a 2011 Yamaha V-Max. Man I wanted that bike badly![/QUOTE]

I know right, same thing happens with me and wifes.

Nolz
11-28-2013, 03:04 AM
hahahaha!!!!!

guzzi45
12-04-2013, 08:42 AM
Mine too! I wondered why it took all day to get the bike back until he admitted he hadn't noticed the bit about 2000 revs in the workshop manual... Duh!

ChrisHall
12-06-2013, 05:36 AM
Still not to worry, I am still impressed wit my Capo, lets see how it fairs after a UK winter. Mine is all ACF50'd up now in preparation for it :)

Keith C

Keith,

ACF50 is top stuff - I've just done my bike for the winter, although I don't ride it until the salt has been washed from the roads and its stored in a warm garage - you can't be too careful. :lover: I'd be interested on how the finish on the Capo fairs if your riding it over the winter.

I used to apply the ACF50 from the aerosol onto a rag and wipe the bike down. This gave reasonable coverage given that ACF50 creeps over the surface. I now buy ACF50 liquid in litre bottles and use a cheap paint spray gun and an air compressor (which I already had) to apply a very fine mist of ACF50 all over the the bike, I cover the wheels, hand grips, dash, seat etc with cloths. Takes about 10 minutes to coat the bike.

Cheers
Chris

ChrisHall
12-06-2013, 03:11 PM
If you are in any doubt about how great ACF50 is for you bike, here are a few pics of my bikes that have been treated with the magic stuff over the years.

2000 ZX12R, not bad for 80,000 miles - used rain or shine (but not with road salt).

238067

238068

238069


And a ZZR1400 with 40,000 miles on clock, again used rain or shine

238070

238071

238072

238073

238074

Go buy a can now!

RobZorba
12-07-2013, 11:50 AM
Hi Chris, I used to store my 'bikes in a warm garage until I realized that for every 3 degrees C rise in temperature, the rate of corrosion doubles. After nearly ruining my first 'bike, I then started parking my 'bikes under an open car port roof, as well as washing them down well after every ride to make sure no salt was picked up. I've had no winter corrosion issues since then.