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View Full Version : GIVI Install Step-by-step



Whiplash23
01-22-2012, 04:56 PM
So after getting the idea from another forum member (from whom I stole this idea), I have installed a GIVI V46 top-case on my Tuono. The install should be pretty straight forward if you have removed the evap canister, but I wanted to keep mine so I had to get slightly creative in terms of fasteners and bolt hole pattern. I figured I'd posted some detailed info just in case anyone wants to give it a try. Here are the necessary items:

1x Rear seat (suggest using a spare)
1x GIVI E250 Universal rack
1x GIVI top-case of your choosing
2x M6 x 35 Button Head Screw (1.00 Pitch)
1x M6 x 30 Button Head Screw (1.00 Pitch)
1x M6 x 60 Button Head Screw (1.00 Pitch) (I used a hex bolt as the hardware store didn't have a 60mm button head screw)
12x M6 Flat Washers (not quite fender washers, but wider than the basic SAE variety and those in the E250 kit)
1x – 4x M6 Fender Washers (See step 6)
11x M6 Nuts with locking nylon inserts (the E250 kit comes with 4, I used three of them plus eight others)
1x M6 Nut
1x Some foam (I used a foam mattress pad used for camping)

Here are the basic steps:
1. Remove cover from rear seat (save for later). I used a set of needle nose pliers to pull the staples.
2. Remove foam from rear seat. The foam was "glued" to the seat pan (front part of the seat only) with some sort of red stuff. I used WD-40 and a rag and the red stuff came right off. I then rinsed the seat with water to get the WD-40 off, blew it dry with an air compressor, then used some rubbing alcohol to get the last bits of WD-40 and water off of the plastic. You can discard the foam.
3. Locate and drill holes per location in picture. I overlaid the E250 rack on the seat pan and used a marker to mark hole locations (I also used a q-tip dipped in finger paint to mark hole locations when the marker was too fat). Once located, I used a small drill bit to make a pilot hole, then finished with a 1/4 inch drill bit. Note that these hole locations get the E250 rack further aft than the fwd edge of the seat pan, allowing room for the rider when the case is installed. Anything more forward and you likely have a GIVI case against your back.
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4. With a washer on either side of the seat pan, install the screws per the picture. The 60mm goes in the rear, the 30mm goes in the front, and the two 35mm go on either side. Secure using nuts with nylon inserts.
5. Here is where it gets tricky. If you just put the E250 rack on at this point and tighten it, the seat pan will flex and the screws will all extend above the top of the E250 rack (preventing installation of the top-case). To deal with this, I created an artificial shelf with nuts, see picture. On the front screw, I used a regular nut and threaded it until in contacted the nut with the nylon insert. On the others, I used the nuts with nylon inserts that came in the E250 kit. Note that the rear of the seat pan (pointy part) needs to be 2-3mm lower than the bottom of the E250 rack in order to clear the brake light on the bike when installing. This part takes a lot of trial and error to get things located correctly.
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6. Test fit with the E250 rack and see of the nuts will clear the square cut-outs (in the E250 rack) and thus tighten up against the square, slotted bits that come in the E250 kit. If they do, then you are good to go. One of mine did not (rear most screw) and in order to get a decent bearing surface on the bottom of the E250 rack, I lowered the nut a couple of threads and placed a fender washer on top of it (see above pic).
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7. At this point, I installed the E250 rack and it was probably just fine. However, there wasn’t a lot of support to keep the case from wiggling left and right and I didn’t want to crack the seat pan due to vibration. So, I cut some foam to get compressed between the seat and the E250 rack and give a little more support from vibration. See pic for foam installation. Make sure it is thick enough to compress.
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8. In order to protect the foam from weather (and also protect the ECU per my dealers suggestion), I put the seat cover back on the seat and cut some slots to allow the screws and nuts to extend through. Don’t forget to put the fender washers back on top of the nuts (if necessary).
9. Put the E250 rack on, using the square slotted bits, a washer, and a nut with nylon insert. I needed an extra set of hands to get the foam compressed and get the nuts started. Tighten everything down and put it on the bike!

In the interest of full disclosure, I haven’t had a chance to go ride with this setup as the weather here sucks right now. If I run into any problems, I’ll let you know. So for the lawyers among us, I am not saying that this install works, it is simply what I did.

Here is what the V46 case looks like on the Tuono:
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tscott
01-22-2012, 09:21 PM
Nice write up...

Volfy
01-23-2012, 09:26 AM
Excellent idea. How secure is the top case when installed? Is there any slop with the pillion retention tabs and keyed slot?

I was just looking at the "spare" pillion seat (Factory comes with both a pillion seat and a cover) and thinking about doing something similar. Although, I was looking at fabricating a front perch that gets bolted down to the two bolts where the grab belt would go. Then sohmewhere towars the back end another support rail.

50Joe
01-23-2012, 01:07 PM
Where's my royalty check?:p:

Whiplash23
01-23-2012, 08:05 PM
50Joe, your check is in the mail ;-) But seriously, thanks for posting your set-up as it is solely responsible for me giving this a try.

Volfy, the case seems to be secure. There is no slop in the seat pan to bike interface. In fact, it is so tight that it is a real pain to get the seat lock to engage. However, the seat pan does have some flex as it is made from thin (approx 1/8" - 3/16"), pliable plastic. I used large-ish washers and added the foam to try and distribute any forces from the case back into the seat pan over as wide an area as possible. If I put my hand on the case and give it a gentle shake, the whole bike wiggles so I think it will be good to go. I am a little concerned about cracking the plastic seat pan, but am not going to start scheming a new, more robust design unless this one breaks.

SecondGen7
01-23-2012, 09:47 PM
... the weather here sucks right now.

Yes it does! Although tomorrow may be decent enough to ride.

As to the topic at hand, nice work! (and kudos on the inspiration/trailblazing, 50Joe) It's certainly a clean install. I use an 11-liter tailbag (http://www.motorcyclegear.com/parts/closeouts/luggage/nelson_rigg/cl80_mini_sport_tail_bag.html) with great success but it's nowhere near the carrying capacity of that Givi.

manxkipper
01-24-2012, 04:29 AM
181487
Excellent idea. How secure is the top case when installed? Is there any slop with the pillion retention tabs and keyed slot?

I was just looking at the "spare" pillion seat (Factory comes with both a pillion seat and a cover) and thinking about doing something similar. Although, I was looking at fabricating a front perch that gets bolted down to the two bolts where the grab belt would go. Then sohmewhere towars the back end another support rail.


Something like this? I have a 35l Givi attached to this plate. Not sure i would want to load heavy items with the plastic seat as a backing plate.

50Joe
01-24-2012, 09:33 AM
Search for my post guys. I added bungee buddies to each side of my 50 liter GIVI trunk. I then run a strap from the passenger footpeg area to the bungee buddy. This makes the top case really secure and no worries at all. It does not move one bit and I have road tested this at 100 mph with a buddy following me on his FJR1300. No movement of the case was detected and it feels very secure. I also added bungee buddies to the top of the trunk so I could strap a bag onto it. Yes, this may look goofy going down the road but I only intend to use it in an emergency situation when extra carrying ability is needed. I travel light and a 50 liter trunk with a tankbag should be more than enough room for me even if I'm camping.

Volfy
01-24-2012, 11:30 AM
Something like this? I have a 35l Givi attached to this plate. Not sure i would want to load heavy items with the plastic seat as a backing plate.Yes, those are the mounting points I was thinking of. That is one stout mounting plate you got there. Looks like it'll take 35lbs of load easily. For the front mount, I was thinking of an inverted "U" or "Ω" bracket bolted down to the two points and out through the "cutouts" on the stock pillion seat. This way, there is at least some weather protection for the underseat storage area.

Whiplash23
01-25-2012, 12:05 AM
I've been giving the load capacity of the seat pan some thought, as I am a bit paranoid by nature. The seat pan is designed to support the weight of a passenger. So (read with a hint of optimism), as long as the load isn't concentrated on too small of an area, the pan should be able to take a lot more load than the case itself is rated for (22lbs). I wasn't real happy about transferring all of the load through four small points, so I added the foam (I'm guessing about 10 square inches of contact area). Even if you round up to 30lbs to include the weight of the case and the rack, I'm only loading that plastic seat pan at 3psi fully loaded.

For reference, rough calculations assuming a 150lbs passenger and a guess-tament that 60% of their weight is concentrated on their sitting bones (figure load is distributed over two 3" diameter circles by time the load reaches the seat pan) shows that the seat pan should be good up to a little more than 6psi.

Lots of guessing in the above, but I think I am being conservative and I am showing a pretty healthy margin. I plan on lots of test rides and inspecting the mount very frequently at first, but I think it'll work. At any rate, when you see a guy on the side of the road with a busted GIVI case and his crap strewn all over the road, at least you'll know who it is :-)

Volfy
01-25-2012, 10:05 AM
I've been giving the load capacity of the seat pan some thought, as I am a bit paranoid by nature. The seat pan is designed to support the weight of a passenger. So (read with a hint of optimism), as long as the load isn't concentrated on too small of an area, the pan should be able to take a lot more load than the case itself is rated for (22lbs). I wasn't real happy about transferring all of the load through four small points, so I added the foam (I'm guessing about 10 square inches of contact area). Even if you round up to 30lbs to include the weight of the case and the rack, I'm only loading that plastic seat pan at 3psi fully loaded.

For reference, rough calculations assuming a 150lbs passenger and a guess-tament that 60% of their weight is concentrated on their sitting bones (figure load is distributed over two 3" diameter circles by time the load reaches the seat pan) shows that the seat pan should be good up to a little more than 6psi.

Lots of guessing in the above, but I think I am being conservative and I am showing a pretty healthy margin. I plan on lots of test rides and inspecting the mount very frequently at first, but I think it'll work. At any rate, when you see a guy on the side of the road with a busted GIVI case and his crap strewn all over the road, at least you'll know who it is :-)
Yes and no. I am sure the pillion seat - and the support structure - will take even a 250 lbs passenger. Not a pretty sight, but I've seen it done on a sportbike. However, a passenger's weight is strictly a compression load, since his/her butt is unlikely to be coupled (glued, bolted, attached, etc.) to the pillion.:) OTOH, a top cased bolted to the pillion seat will also tend to "pull" on the seat pan in different ways depending on whether the bike's accelerating, braking or cornering. That's what I would be more concerned about, as the pillion seat was never designed to withstand that sort of loading.

That said, I do think that as long as the top case is not over-loaded, and it's used only occasionally, this set up will work just fine. Sure looks mightly convenient for commuting on a beautiful day, where I'm inclined to take the RSV instead of my usual Triumph Sprint ST commuter rig.

manxkipper
01-26-2012, 01:06 AM
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Yes, those are the mounting points I was thinking of. That is one stout mounting plate you got there. Looks like it'll take 35lbs of load easily. For the front mount, I was thinking of an inverted "U" or "Ω" bracket bolted down to the two points and out through the "cutouts" on the stock pillion seat. This way, there is at least some weather protection for the underseat storage area.

I have a specially cut foam insert which I use to isolate the underseat area. Not shown in the pic as the mounts would not be visible. The box and plate have been tested at 240+ with now ill effects.

I have also modified a ventura rack I had from my R1 to fit the Tuono and added the givi box to that in place of the rack. It leaves the plate free for other luggage.

Volfy
01-26-2012, 09:18 AM
Never thought of the Tuono as sport tourer, but nothing a little tinkering couldn't fix. Impressive job. :worship:

ApriliaTuono
01-26-2012, 12:35 PM
Great write up! I'm planning to do something similar with 37 liter Givi or Shad case. A couple of questions to the OP or anyone with similar setup:
- please post a picture of the seat/plate mounted on the bike with the case removed
- how do you get yourself on or off the bike?

Whiplash23
01-26-2012, 10:23 PM
Getting onto the bike is pretty easy. You obviously can't swing your leg over the bike like you do when nothing is there, but you can essentially step over the rider's seat and slide on. The Tuono seat height is pretty low so it is pretty easy to do. Here is the pic you requested:
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Whiplash23
01-31-2012, 07:18 PM
So some bad news. I took the seat apart this past weekend to see if the foam was holding up. It had taken a permanent set to the compressed shape after only a week and was no longer offering any support. While the seat pan was probably strong enough by itself, I got the wild hair to build a metal seat pan. Everything was going well until I took the metal tab on the front of the rear seat off to mount to my sheet-metal seat-pan. I had to destroy the seat to get the tab off, and then found out that there is no good way to mount it to a sheet metal pan (very odd shape).

Given the uncertainty at this point, and the amount of $ I have pissed away on the mount (spare rear seat and a bunch of random hardware), I decided to cut my losses and order a Kreiga soft bag. I'm pretty bummed about this turn of events, and should have just left well-enough alone with regards to the seat pan. Win some, lose some.

50Joe
01-31-2012, 08:38 PM
Mine works great. I loaded that 50L sucker up and went down to Road Atlanta to watch some races a few months ago.

Whiplash23
01-31-2012, 08:55 PM
I think my setup would have worked if I hadn't tried to go "improve" it. I was ultimately unhappy with my bolt hole pattern, which I had to use b/c I wanted to keep the evap can. I also wasn't crazy about the idea of adding straps.