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MisterSprinkles
07-16-2008, 08:25 PM
This is really weird- thought I would share..

Normally, my maximum attainable speed is about 90-91km/h (55ish MPH) with 95 if I have no headwind or Im drafting a car.

I usually use "ESSO" 91 octane (RON+MON/2) which I squeeze out of the trigger very slowly to make sure I get the exact amount I want (i.e. exactly $7 so I dont have to get in line)

Anyways today as an experiment I jammed 2.5 liters of the 91 in at max speed, then drove to Sunoco and jammed 2.5 liters of their 94 in at max speed.

Next thing I know I'm doing 100Km/h+ (I backed off cuzz I couldn't believe it) AND making like 200-300RPM more than usual under identical to usual conditions..

JLF
07-16-2008, 08:29 PM
So now I wonder what effect octane boosters would have?

Good naturally... Meaning more power...

But how much is too much?

Or even a bit of race gas mixed in?

MisterSprinkles
07-16-2008, 08:39 PM
I'd go with the race gas before I went with the octane booster... and I'd be really really careful. The engines we get for street use are not really designed to take fuel that's blowing that hard and if you over did the ratio you'd be really out of luck with a blown gasket or something

Mr. Scootswell
07-16-2008, 08:45 PM
Watch your race gas. The stuff I used in my Zuma was leaded. Alright for
some 2t's, but maybe not these.

tstodda
07-16-2008, 10:16 PM
I rode a Zuma with race gas last year, it was hard to believe how much faster it really was. I only rode it briefly before throwing it back at the owner out of fear I would blow the thing up(yeah that race gas really gives it some power).

Isn't it conclusive these SR's are fussy enough? Maybe in another life I will pour in some race gas:worship:

muchacho
07-16-2008, 10:41 PM
This is really weird- thought I would share..

Normally, my maximum attainable speed is about 90-91km/h (55ish MPH) with 95 if I have no headwind or Im drafting a car.

I usually use "ESSO" 91 octane (RON+MON/2) which I squeeze out of the trigger very slowly to make sure I get the exact amount I want (i.e. exactly $7 so I dont have to get in line)

Anyways today as an experiment I jammed 2.5 liters of the 91 in at max speed, then drove to Sunoco and jammed 2.5 liters of their 94 in at max speed.

Next thing I know I'm doing 100Km/h+ (I backed off cuzz I couldn't believe it) AND making like 200-300RPM more than usual under identical to usual conditions..

I guarantee you it is not the solution. Coincidentally, my bike ran great all day today.

You are going to come back and recant your gas finding.

I heard you can trick the shit out of a GTS250 though!

smartbomb
07-16-2008, 10:45 PM
Race gas will not blow up your engine.

THE MAX
07-16-2008, 11:26 PM
Tested with AV-Gas (bleu)..............

-Found no results ,for beeing wurt it

Oldrogue
07-17-2008, 02:33 AM
AV GAS, Holy Shit
Used to handle that stuff in the Navy and we couldnt where normal shoes around it because of sparking. Had spherical containers to eliminate fumes collecting in corners. Took the front end off of an LSD when she collided with a tanker I was on in 1970. Only someone crazy enough to go out on pilot boats in the North Atlantic would play with AV GAS in a SR50.

smartbomb
07-17-2008, 10:45 AM
AV gas isnt any more explosive than regular gas. Just lots of lead and pretty high octane.

MisterSprinkles
07-17-2008, 01:51 PM
AV gas isnt any more explosive than regular gas. Just lots of lead and pretty high octane.

True but military grade aviation fuel is rediculously sparkier. I've read about this too.

O.R. You've gotta start a thread about all the cool shit you've done man. If it just kinda leaks out that you sat in an F-22 and worked on a navy ship, there's gotta be cooler stuff you've done


Muchacho- Hate to say Im still getting better top end today. I really think this gas thing is for real.

clsmooth
07-17-2008, 06:55 PM
I played around with different octanes before I put the hallow pipe on.

Chevron 92 by itself was alright, some detonation here and there. Put in Chev 92 + NOs +3 octance boost (=95) and detonation was nearly gone. Same results with Chev 94.

Added the NOs +3 octane to the 94... terrible. Worse then when I started with. I think the ECU/programming is set with a certain octane range in mind (probably to compensate for the various fuels around the world). I found straight Chev 94 to be best for me.

Oldrogue
07-18-2008, 12:06 AM
Thanks MS, but its not worth it. Smartbomb and I pm a lot and I can have that discussion (story)lol with him directly if he is interested. There are so many experts on this forum :worship:with universal knowledge:bs: I believe I would be boring.:tired: You are correct about the milspecs on AVGAS vs. Amaco regular. AVGAS primarily was used with the Navy A-1 single prop and there were still some around at the time I was in. Believe me, that incredible machine would not run on regular. But, thats another story. By the way the Rapter does not run on either.
Denny
By the way I know this sounds crazy but regular works best for me. For USA octane that is 87, no ethenol.

muchacho
07-18-2008, 12:29 AM
Muchacho- Hate to say Im still getting better top end today. I really think this gas thing is for real.

So am I... let's keep updating each other on weather condition. I wonder if our bikes will loose performance at the same time.

waxfang
08-04-2009, 10:31 AM
The Sunoco near my house has an unleaded 104 octane pump. I was debating filling it with this on my last fill up, since we're talking a difference of maybe a buck to top of the SR50's tank, but I wasn't sure if the Ditech will advance the timing to take advantage of it, or if like a lot of modern engines run with higher octane they're not designed for, you'd just end up with more carbon buildup from the gas not igniting properly.

Also, I'm pretty sure these don't contain ethanol either, which would be welcome...

bumdo01
08-05-2009, 11:25 PM
so would race gas be a power increaser for ditechs???

waxfang
08-05-2009, 11:38 PM
so would race gas be a power increaser for ditechs???

With a lot of modern engines that can't take advantage of it by advancing the timing, at best, nothing happens. At worst, the higher octane gas doesn't ignite properly/completely (contrary to popular belief, higher octane = harder to ignite), and causes carbon buildup in the engine.

From everything I've read on here, the DiTechs run really aggressive timing, but obviously, I don't want to muck anything up if the engine can't do anything with it.

Stek
08-06-2009, 12:34 AM
I worked with several automotive engineers that used to roll their eyes when this subject came up (and it came up often). They tended to argue that higher octane fuels provided no additional performance or mileage benefit beyond the octane the engine was designed for. It is also my understanding that high octane may also cause harder cold starts. Wikipedia tends to agree with what these automotive engineers had to say...

From Wikipedia:

Many high-performance engines are designed to operate with a high maximum compression, and thus demand high-octane premium gasoline. A common misconception is that power output or fuel mileage can be improved by burning higher octane fuel than a particular engine was designed for. The power output of an engine depends in part on the energy density of its fuel, but similar fuels with different octane ratings have similar density. Since switching to a higher octane fuel does not add any more hydrocarbon content or oxygen, the engine cannot produce more power.

However, burning fuel with a lower octane rating than required by the engine often reduces power output and efficiency one way or another. If the engine begins to detonate (knock), that reduces power and efficiency for the reasons stated above. Many modern car engines feature a knock sensor – a small piezoelectric microphone which detects knock, and then sends a signal to the engine control unit to retard the ignition timing. Retarding the ignition timing reduces the tendency to detonate, but also reduces power output and fuel efficiency.

The higher rating seen in Europe is an artifact of a different underlying measuring procedure. In most countries (including all of Europe and Australia) the "headline" octane that would be shown on the pump is the RON, but in the United States, Canada and some other countries the headline number is the average of the RON and the MON, sometimes called the Anti-Knock Index (AKI), Road Octane Number (RdON), Pump Octane Number (PON), or (R+M)/2. Because of the 8 to 10 point difference noted above, this means that the octane in the United States will be about 4 to 5 points lower than the same fuel elsewhere: 87 octane fuel, the "regular" gasoline in the US and Canada, would be 91-92 in Europe. However most European pumps deliver 95 (RON) as "regular", equivalent to 90–91 US (R+M)/2, and deliver 98 (RON), 99 or 100 (RON) labeled as Super Unleaded.


I choose to quote wiki in this thread due to its credibility. There seems to be so much mis-information on this subject that I believe it merits a well documented credible source. It is not my intent to offend anyone's belief system with this quote.

In contrast I have heard one argument about the quality of various fuels. For instance typical 92 octane pump gas may evaporate by 400 degrees F. A higher quality (more highly refined) gas could contain hydrocarbons that fully evaporate at 270 degrees F. It is argued that the lower evaporation temperature could evaporate more quickly positively affecting performance at higher RPM. I am not sure I fully believe this claim, I would need to see it on a dyno. None-the-less it is interesting and may explain a little bit of what we feel in the seat of our pants.

waxfang
08-06-2009, 01:21 AM
A common misconception is that power output or fuel mileage can be improved by burning higher octane fuel than a particular engine was designed for.

Pretty much what I was trying to say, in a roundabout way. At best, you're literally burning money. At worst, you're setting yourself up for carbon build up down the road.

Knowing that in Europe, their "regular" is equivalent to our premium in many parts of the US that aren't fortunate enough to have 93-94 octane pumps, I'm wondering if there's any benefit at all to running anything higher. However, the DiTech's seem to be carbon build up prone just by way of being DI, so obviously I don't want to accelerate the process.

WTB
08-06-2009, 02:45 AM
Stek,Very well said!

I have owned my bike 1 year and 3 months, bought it with 4 miles. I have "ALWAYS" run "Top" name brand fuel from three local stations. If I have to get fuel from other than these, when I get home I siphon it out and clean/ flush the fuel delivery system. I have 2300 miles, (1 year 3 months). I have replaced fuel filter once.

Most all of these miles have been "testing" miles. I have always run the highest octane I could obtain.I have siphoned MORE fuel out than I have 'Run" through the bike. I have a 4 gal container that has only been used(from "new") to get my fuel. At first I tried everybrand that was local. Slell,Gulf,Exxon,Shell,Enmark,Ingles and a few others. I settled on Chevron 93,Enmark 93 or Ingles 93.

I'd go to one station and get 4 gal. add Sea Foam and fill the bike up. And begin "testing/tuning". If I buy from one station and the bike has issues, I "rule out" everything else I then drain the fuel and refill with fresh gas from another station. At any given time the fuel can be the cause of these "issues". I think that it depends how soon before/after (how full is the tank) the staion has had a delivery from when I get the fuel. I think that "moisture(water) content is a big factor.

I believe there are two main factors that affects the performance of these bikes at any given time. PLUGS AND FUEL. I have gone through, maybe 50 plugs of all brands and gaps and like I said before, I have siphoned more fuel out of my bike than I have run through it. I have dropped my fuel regulator bowl about 10 times to remove the drop or two of water that has settled there. I have filled my tank with fresh fuel begin testing,then next day
drain an refill.

This little 1 cyl can't handle much moisure and chances are, out of a box of ten plugs, three may be bad plugs right out of the box.I have put a new plug in,take a test ride, bike runs like shit, change the plug (maybe be another new one or an old (depends on situation) and the bikes runs good. The same is with the fuel. I can fill with fresh fuel, hit the road, bike runs like shit, drain/refill and bike runs good.

With a V8 you have 8 "chances" "luck of the draw" to have 'good fire from the plugs. With 8 plugs you have a better chance of being able to burn the "water in the fuel".

With the SR50, we have "one" chance(one plug) and not enough fire to "burn" the water. It is really hard to ignite water.

I have had "Carbon issues" at times and have used Carb cleaner/PB Blaster to spray up in cyl to clean a couple of times. One "bad" plug or one bad tank of gas "could " cause a carbon problem.

BTW Stex, due to your post I will use W-40 (bought a gal can) along with Sea Foam to maitain my fuel pump and Fuel System. The next time I clean my cyl I'll use the WD40/Sea Foam. Both of these products "Rock".

I believe HG's post about winter/summer/fall (hot cold temps) that affects detonatiion/pre-detonation, vaporization and atomization is "right on".

BTW In my sell ad for the bike, When I say that my bike is "well maitained" I do mean"Well" and also "Constanly".







I worked with several automotive engineers that used to roll their eyes when this subject came up (and it came up often). They tended to argue that higher octane fuels provided no additional performance or mileage benefit beyond the octane the engine was designed for. It is also my understanding that high octane may also cause harder cold starts. Wikipedia tends to agree with what these automotive engineers had to say...

From Wikipedia:


I choose to quote wiki in this thread due to its credibility. There seems to be so much mis-information on this subject that I believe it merits a well documented credible source. It is not my intent to offend anyone's belief system with this quote.

In contrast I have heard one argument about the quality of various fuels. For instance typical 92 octane pump gas may evaporate by 400 degrees F. A higher quality (more highly refined) gas could contain hydrocarbons that fully evaporate at 270 degrees F. It is argued that the lower evaporation temperature could evaporate more quickly positively affecting performance at higher RPM. I am not sure I fully believe this claim, I would need to see it on a dyno. None-the-less it is interesting and may explain a little bit of what we feel in the seat of our pants.

High Gain Tuning
08-06-2009, 03:37 AM
With a lot of modern engines that can't take advantage of it by advancing the timing, at best, nothing happens. At worst, the higher octane gas doesn't ignite properly/completely (contrary to popular belief, higher octane = harder to ignite), and causes carbon buildup in the engine.

From everything I've read on here, the DiTechs run really aggressive timing, but obviously, I don't want to muck anything up if the engine can't do anything with it.

Actually modern engines are the few that can take advantage of premium pump fuel because they are constantly advancing their timing.... more below.

Bumdo01 asked about race gas, not high octane consumer pump fuel. There is a significant difference. I have ran 111 unleaded and 114 leaded race fuel and love running it other than it’s $6.00+ a gal. Very abundant here since we have a very nice local drag strip large enough to host the Mile High Nationals.

Your standard premium 91 octane pump fuel has little to no performance benefits in anything unless the engine detonates without it. Detonation and pre-ignition which are 2 totally different occurrences cause the same effect. They cause the fuel in the combustion chamber to complete its burn too quickly which if the piston has not made it all the way to TDC yet can destroy the piston dome and connecting rod bearings. Optimum piston location for peak power is around 13 degrees ATDC. Earlier can damage the engine with poor performance and later just produces poor power.

All of today’s engines run at least 1 and some multiple "knock / detonation" sensors. The engines Powertrain Control Module continually runs the ignition timing up to the point of detonation then backs it off. Premium "pump" fuels burn slower which can help engines suffering from detonation or pre-ignition. I have written more on this somewhere I believe if you can find it and have spent years of research in this field. I have spent hundreds and hundreds of hours at the GM "Desert Proving Grounds" in Arizona where we do our hot climate testing.

We have there what's called a fuel farm. Buried fuel tanks, dozens of them that contain fuel from suppliers around the world. When a car goes through hot climate testing it is ran with 5 gallons of (depending on export) fuel from most of the tanks. Maybe you have never wondered what fuel is used when a manufacturer is field testing their cars.... All of them!

Before retiring I spent my last 5 years here in Denver training and conducting field engineering duties at the Mile High Emissions Lab.

Haribolman
08-06-2009, 06:48 AM
7 years if riding my Ditech has proved one thing. It's crucial to find petrol (gas) and oil that makes it operate properly. Regular readers may remember I found out long ago that my bike simply hates Shell! Here in Oz, it runs great on Mobil...and not 95 RON, simply 91 RON.

And a couple of years ago there was a rash of Ditech's being brought into the local dealer all suffering from the same problem. Wouldn't run properly. After suffering the same fate and discovering my fuel was brown and muddy, I drained the tank, refilled with clean fuel and instantly solved the problem. I passed on this info to the mechanic and he was able to help a few other Ditech owners by doing the same thing. Seems there was a batch of bad fuel going around.

Well guess what, it's happened again! Read this http://www.news.com.au/story/0,27574,25892573-29277,00.html

waxfang
08-06-2009, 09:51 AM
Actually modern engines are the few that can take advantage of premium pump fuel because they are constantly advancing their timing.... more below.

Bumdo01 asked about race gas, not high octane consumer pump fuel. There is a significant difference. I have ran 111 unleaded and 114 leaded race fuel and love running it other than it’s $6.00+ a gal.
...

And there you have it, folks... :D

I know not all engines are the same; a lot of the newer V8's will run on regular without issue, but the OEM's will advertise what power levels you can expect with different grades of fuel.

The K20 in my Honda by contrast won't do diddly squat with higher octane fuel. I've run a tank of 94 through it to see if it would help it's borderline pitiful mileage, and a few gallons of 104 filling the tank before an auto-x for giggles, and neither did a thing for mileage or performance.

However, my '94 Impreza with a Japanese EJ20 swap and a Tec II, LOVED race gas obviously, but I'm sure you could get it to drag itself down the street on cream soda if you got creative with the mapping.

Then again, like the Aprilia, the engine came from a country where gas is always $6 a gallon, and octane ratings are significantly higher across the board. As-is, the engine management was necessary to get the car to run properly on our 93 octane gas.

Again, not trying to debate your wealth of knowledge on the subject, but in my experience anyways, it depends on the engine, which is why I was asking. Some cars are happier with it, others it doesn't do a thing, and on others, it causes build up over the long term.

Glad to know the SR will take whatever you throw at it, mwahaha... :D

bobaganoush
08-06-2009, 10:36 AM
Will it make a difference if I'm using 87, 89 or 93?
For the extra cents I don't care to go 'all out', but does it matter?

Grenadiers
08-06-2009, 10:39 AM
And there you have it, folks... :D

I know not all engines are the same; a lot of the newer V8's will run on regular without issue, but the OEM's will advertise what power levels you can expect with different grades of fuel.

The K20 in my Honda by contrast won't do diddly squat with higher octane fuel. I've run a tank of 94 through it to see if it would help it's borderline pitiful mileage, and a few gallons of 104 filling the tank before an auto-x for giggles, and neither did a thing for mileage or performance.

However, my '94 Impreza with a Japanese EJ20 swap and a Tec II, LOVED race gas obviously, but I'm sure you could get it to drag itself down the street on cream soda if you got creative with the mapping.

Then again, like the Aprilia, the engine came from a country where gas is always $6 a gallon, and octane ratings are significantly higher across the board. As-is, the engine management was necessary to get the car to run properly on our 93 octane gas.

Again, not trying to debate your wealth of knowledge on the subject, but in my experience anyways, it depends on the engine, which is why I was asking. Some cars are happier with it, others it doesn't do a thing, and on others, it causes build up over the long term.

Glad to know the SR will take whatever you throw at it, mwahaha... :D

Well, just don’t do what one scooter owner did awhile back and put in what he thought was 2 FULL CANS of NOS additive (why he wanted to put in 2 cans worth instead of a couple of oz’s is anyone’s guess), only to discover that it wasn’t the fuel additive… but the drink!

There was a lot of chuckling about that one…

waxfang
08-06-2009, 10:53 AM
Well, just don’t do what one scooter owner did awhile back and put in what he thought was 2 FULL CANS of NOS additive (why he wanted to put in 2 cans worth instead of a couple of oz’s is anyone’s guess), only to discover that it wasn’t the fuel additive… but the drink!

There was a lot of chuckling about that one…

So basically he's the AF1 forum equivalent of the Audi guy who wanted to port and polish his intake by sucking a bag of sand into the intake? :D

bobaganoush - Aprilia recommends 91 minimum as I recall, so I'd stick with 93.

bobaganoush
08-06-2009, 10:58 AM
bobaganoush - Aprilia recommends 91 minimum as I recall, so I'd stick with 93.

Thanks... I guess taking care of this bike is going to take some getting used to, my last one was a TGB which didn't require any attention at all.

Grenadiers
08-06-2009, 11:00 AM
So basically he's the AF1 forum equivalent of the Audi guy who wanted to port and polish his intake by sucking a bag of sand into the intake? :D

Oh man... It just goes to show you… That guy wasn’t a member of this forum, but another forum and a member from here had read it and posted the link on this forum. Both of these guys should be nominees for the “Darwin Award”… Mind you the guy that used the NOS energy drink could almost be forgiven as the 2 bottles do look a bit alike. Needless to say the scoot didn’t run that good…

I’m just waiting to hear about a cyclist drinking what he thought was the NOS energy drink only to discover it’s the fuel additive…

Grenadiers
08-06-2009, 11:03 AM
bobaganoush - Aprilia recommends 91 minimum as I recall, so I'd stick with 93.

I have a sticker located right by my gas cap that even says that (chances are good you too have that same sticker).

:peace:

waxfang
08-06-2009, 11:28 AM
Thanks... I guess taking care of this bike is going to take some getting used to, my last one was a TGB which didn't require any attention at all.

*shrug*

I've been riding mine everywhere instead of driving the car for the last 2 months, and the friend I bought it from rode it for a year while he was working on his project car.

Other than the obvious routine stuff (checking filters, gear oil changes, etc. at the specified intervals) this thing has pretty much been maintenance free.

bobaganoush
08-06-2009, 11:48 AM
*shrug*

I've been riding mine everywhere instead of driving the car for the last 2 months, and the friend I bought it from rode it for a year while he was working on his project car.

Other than the obvious routine stuff (checking filters, gear oil changes, etc. at the specified intervals) this thing has pretty much been maintenance free.

Good to know. That was always my plan of how things would be... until after I joined this forum. I kind of got the impression this would demand more attention than a regular scoot.

Micah / AF1 Racing
08-06-2009, 01:02 PM
Just to help with data logged facts. On my old 70cc Malossi kitted Ditech, 87 octane pump fuel was the horsepower king. C12 was next oddly enough at 110 octane leaded, but it does burn at a high temp. Ultimate 2 and Ultimate 4 both made less power than 87 pump as did MR9. I personally would be inclined to use 100LL AvGas just because it is lightly leaded real gasoline with ZERO ethanol...but only if I lived at or very near a private airport with pay at the pump!

lotto2k7
08-06-2009, 03:55 PM
i live in England, United Kingdom.
is there any real difference between normal unleaded and the "better version"
ie. Shell Unleaded Vs Shell Unleaded V-Power
or Bp Unleaded Vs Bp Unleaded Ultimate?

The only difference i can tell is the "better" petrol hurts my pocket more...

High Gain Tuning
08-06-2009, 03:58 PM
The DiTechs fixed timing isn't set up to take advantage of a slow burning premium pump fuel. When I dyno my Busa I always make sure standard 87 is in it and it turns the highest numbers. A power output graph of the DiTech from 87-114 race fuel would look like an upside down bell curve. I use to run AV gas in a 68 Corvette 327CI / 350HP I had. A couple blocks from where I worked was a crop dusting airstrip and it could be pumped right there. That cured all my hot summer detonation issues.

748rsvr999r
08-06-2009, 07:19 PM
I too have tried Sunoco leaded race fuel in the scoot, maybe runs a tad smoother due to the lubrication properties of the lead, but no noticeable power gain. I had tried the same race fuel in a couple of Ducati's and my RSVR, smoothed them right out for a while, then ended up with lead fouling on the plugs causing the bikes to run like shit, with severe misses a 6K plus rpm. 87 in the scoot works fine for me.
Fran

DJ GT-S
08-06-2009, 08:21 PM
Contrary to what could be believed by reading this thread, this bike isn't such a prima donna.

There are only 2 mistakes you could make... using Motul 710 synthetic oil, and filling up at some back water fuel outpost in the middle of nowhere between two John Deeres.

Fuel freshness or water content in urban fuel stations shouldn't be a concern. All you have to do is shop around for the fuel that's got the most kick to it. If by any chance you do get a bad batch of fuel, it's gonna SLOP for a bit, but just flog the bike until it's all burnt off and refuel at your usual trusted place.

If the worst come to the worst, add a few oz of seafoam to an almost empty tank and ride the crap out of it until it's empty. That'll clean it real good. I did that the other day after experiencing severe SLOPing after a fill up: Rode like the wind (http://www.apriliaforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=184940&highlight=touched+sky) to burn it off, dunked some SF in, rode some more until it was almost dry. The bike's been running like a champ ever since that shock treatment.

Haribolman
08-06-2009, 10:46 PM
i live in England, United Kingdom.
is there any real difference between normal unleaded and the "better version"
ie. Shell Unleaded Vs Shell Unleaded V-Power
or Bp Unleaded Vs Bp Unleaded Ultimate?

The only difference i can tell is the "better" petrol hurts my pocket more...

Yup, I came to the same conclusion years ago.

My bike runs best on regular unleaded and runs like shit on the dearer stuff! My guess is the detergents and additives in the dearer stuff don't work well with the Ditech's 40 micron injector.

onu123
08-07-2009, 01:03 PM
Just red this thread... Found some good stuff here.
Went to go check some things on my Factory...
Now what do you know! My bikes "instruction" lable had this written on it:
'USE UNLEADED FUEL. [some 3 letters that I forgot.] Min. 95'
That's on a Piaggio engined SR50 Factory (in europe...).
So far i've always used 98 from one petrol company. (Once tanked with 95 & seemed to have SLOP @ sudden WOT [accelerating], so never tanked 95 again =P )
But now I'm considering to try 95 again.
Thats because I have a reeeaallly slow bike (struggles hard to do 90 kph, almost never does) & first post claimed to get more top speed with "better fitting petrol" .
I still have some 98 in, but as soon as i'm out of it, i'm going to use different stuff. Probably can't get lower than 95... not sold in trust-able places.

waxfang
08-07-2009, 02:40 PM
Meh, just checked the pump on my latest fill up, and even Sunoco's 260 race gas is now 10% ethanol. Useless!

muchacho
08-10-2009, 08:50 AM
Contrary to what could be believed by reading this thread, this bike isn't such a prima donna.

There are only 2 mistakes you could make... using Motul 710 synthetic oil, and filling up at some back water fuel outpost in the middle of nowhere between two John Deeres.

Fuel freshness or water content in urban fuel stations shouldn't be a concern. All you have to do is shop around for the fuel that's got the most kick to it. If by any chance you do get a bad batch of fuel, it's gonna SLOP for a bit, but just flog the bike until it's all burnt off and refuel at your usual trusted place.

If the worst come to the worst, add a few oz of seafoam to an almost empty tank and ride the crap out of it until it's empty. That'll clean it real good. I did that the other day after experiencing severe SLOPing after a fill up: Rode like the wind (http://www.apriliaforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=184940&highlight=touched+sky) to burn it off, dunked some SF in, rode some more until it was almost dry. The bike's been running like a champ ever since that shock treatment.:plus:

benzina
08-11-2009, 07:14 AM
:plus:

And a big :plus: to see you Muchacho. The work you put into organizing this GREAT forum (particularly the sticky's) while you were a moderator,continues to be thoroughly enjoyed and appreciated by all. :cheers:

Stek
08-11-2009, 10:28 AM
Another point to consider is when you use "pump gas" into an SR50 1 gallon tank you are most likely not getting what you think anyway.


According to the American Petroleum Institute the gas-pump hose typically retains about one third of a gallon of fuel. - JONATHAN WELSH

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122944043385810527.html

Grenadiers
08-11-2009, 10:43 AM
Another point to consider is when you use "pump gas" into an SR50 1 gallon tank you are most likely not getting what you think anyway.



http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122944043385810527.html

With a lot of pumps at gas stations using the single pump to dispense 3 grades of fuel out of a single hose, that means that up to 1/3 of a gallon is more then likely going to be regular unleaded (if you had selected Premium) first before the higher grade starts to flow…

And what that also means is that if you are filling up with Premium on less then a full tank, you are also getting ripped off (paying for premium but getting more like a mid-grade…)!

Even if you’re paying for a full tank of Premium, much of it could be just plain old regular gas…

Very interesting… I may have to start looking for stations with dedicated fuel pumps for regular and premium fuels…

DJ GT-S
08-15-2009, 05:49 PM
So hey I was out long distance today and as I was saying earlier, one of the few mistakes one can really make is refueling at a rural station... well, I had to.

I'll say this, the bike ran like a champ all day (300+ KM), except after that refuel. At which point it kept getting worse and I barely rolled it home in between the sputters and backfires. During that last leg of the trip is was SLOPing so bad I even tried stopping to let it simmer down (while I ate some quiznos) and check the plug (which was a pristine light brown haze without a hint of any deposit mind you).

This is probably the first batch of ruel I'll empty out, it was horrible out there. ;_;