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XTN SXV
10-31-2007, 03:27 AM
While restling the cover off the stator to check bolts, a spring ended up in drain pan. Where does it fit?

Thanx

cal550b
10-31-2007, 05:14 AM
a spring ok ,you have a spring on the neutral light switch with a small bullet that side,there is a spring on the oil pressure valve and the non return valve, two small springs on the decompressors and one large spring on the gear change,i think thats every spring in the engine ,

Alice Racing
10-31-2007, 05:24 AM
Spring between oil filter and cover ?

cal550b
10-31-2007, 05:42 AM
yes.i also forgot valve springs but if you have one of those in the bottom you have a problem:happy:

Alice Racing
10-31-2007, 05:47 AM
Was guessing he may have changed the filter whilst draining the oil.......can't think of any springs under the ignition cover ???

Picture would help.

cal550b
10-31-2007, 06:04 AM
Was guessing he may have changed the filter whilst draining the oil.......can't think of any springs under the ignition cover ???

Picture would help.

no there isnt any .

XTN SXV
10-31-2007, 09:38 AM
Was guessing he may have changed the filter whilst draining the oil.......can't think of any springs under the ignition cover ???

Picture would help.

If there are no springs in the stator side and there should be one between the filter and the filter cover, i belive it to be the latter. These are the only 2 areas i worked in.

The picture attatched shows Houdini who could have easily F***ked me. Thanx to you its him that'll be behind a screw. :kidding:

cal550b
10-31-2007, 09:48 AM
thats the spring that goes on ya filter and oil cap like stuart said.

XTN SXV
10-31-2007, 10:16 AM
While on the topic of help...

Scarring on the OP Valve Piston (not scuff or scratch...Scare)

The scaring on the piston in the first pic is clearly caused by an object, harder than the piston, finding its way in to the annular, between it and the wall of the cylinder its housed in.

This raises several questions
1 What is in there harder than this piston made of Ferretic stainless steel 430/3cr12 ?
2 Where does it come from?
3 Why is it not trapped by the oil filter?
4 Why does it get in to the annular?

My thoughts on above questions
1&2 Possibly "work-and-or heat hardened" seating/break-in residue. The stuff generally found in the oil and filter at the first oil change.
3&4 It might well be separated by the filter but find its way to the annular through reverse flow during first couple of oil changes if drained through the OP Valve. (you only need one smallll piece)

Concerns
1 In what condition is the Cylinder, Housing the piston?
2 If this contaminant can scare the piston to this degree there is no reason to believe it couldn’t seize it alike. Even with my limited insight the damage caused by overpressure on seals and casings or damage to mechanics by under pressure, is unnecessary by all accounts.


Please advice on repair and prevention.

Thanx
Paul

XTN SXV
10-31-2007, 10:19 AM
thats the spring that goes on ya filter and oil cap like stuart said.

"One time"

Thank you all.

cal550b
10-31-2007, 12:23 PM
not the best pic but you need it to look like this chamfered at the top and polished to a high sheen ,use a bolt that fits inside and put in a drill then you can cut and polish it so it will never stick.

cyborg
11-03-2007, 12:00 AM
While on the topic of help...
Scarring on the OP Valve Piston (not scuff or scratch...Scare)
The scaring on the piston in the first pic is clearly caused by an object, harder than the piston, finding its way in to the annular, between it and the wall of the cylinder its housed in.
This raises several questions
1 What is in there harder than this piston made of Ferretic stainless steel 430/3cr12 ?


I can venture a guess here, having taken some metallurgy classes in college a few decades ago... believe it or not, the scratches (mine got them too) can easily come from aluminum itself. Aluminum, on a micro level, looks like packed grains of sand, very hard aluminum oxide sand on the surface. Aluminum oxide (very hard and often used as sandpaper grit) can easily scratch steel or stainless steel. Ever noticed how fast hardened steel drill and mill bits dull on "soft" aluminum? That's my theory...

I haven't had any problems with oil pressure on my RXV550 but I polished up my OCV piston to get the scratches out and it already had the beveled top edge, and popped it back in.

:cheers:

orangerider2
11-03-2007, 01:31 AM
A little tip here, if you twist the end of the spring outward at one end just enough so it will stay put in the oil filter, that way the spring will stay there until you want to remove it.

THIS IS THE OIL FILTER SPRING:cigar:

XTN SXV
11-03-2007, 03:58 PM
A little tip here, if you twist the end of the spring outward at one end just enough so it will stay put in the oil filter, that way the spring will stay there until you want to remove it.

THIS IS THE OIL FILTER SPRING:cigar:

Sensible tip there, thanx.

XTN SXV
11-03-2007, 04:17 PM
I can venture a guess here, having taken some metallurgy classes in college a few decades ago... believe it or not, the scratches (mine got them too) can easily come from aluminum itself. Aluminum, on a micro level, looks like packed grains of sand, very hard aluminum oxide sand on the surface. Aluminum oxide (very hard and often used as sandpaper grit) can easily scratch steel or stainless steel. Ever noticed how fast hardened steel drill and mill bits dull on "soft" aluminum? That's my theory...

I haven't had any problems with oil pressure on my RXV550 but I polished up my OCV piston to get the scratches out and it already had the beveled top edge, and popped it back in.

:cheers:


My Over Pressure Valve piston is attracted by magnitism therefor it cannot be aluninium. (Unless the thread is a steel insert)

Polished mine and all is well.

It is important to know that more material you remove the bigger the annular becomes, the more the Bypass the lower the dynamic oil pressure.

So try stay away from the ruffstuff and polish with a sutable metal polish, this will allow you many polishes. OR Find out what is causing the problem in the first place, hence my post.

thanx for the input.
paul