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bme61679
02-06-2007, 12:31 PM
Through my searching, I know a lot of the members on here have been riding for 15+ years, a mid 30's average age, and multiple bikes owned before their Aprilia.

I'm looking to get a new bike soon and keep coming back to the RSV (used 04-05). My history is on a SV650S for the past five years and 30,000 miles, I'm 27. The Aprilia is obviously a much more focused machine than the SV. I'm not the fastest guy out there but I do understand (and don't overly push) my abilities.

I'm also looking at the 675 Daytona and GSXR 750 which are a bit more “sensible” but don't do it for me as much as the Aprilia. At the end of the day, I control the throttle but in your opinion would going to an RSV too big of a jump?

ffkevinking
02-06-2007, 12:52 PM
the gsxr 750 will have more power than our rsv's have. I think you'd be fine.

Kev

jimuk
02-06-2007, 01:14 PM
You would have no problem,I stepped up from a rs125 and have been managing fine,if you're a sensible rider it's no problem.

mr_ace5288
02-06-2007, 01:47 PM
my first bike was a rsvr factory, its brilliatn and believe it or not the throttl is in your hands, use it how you want/can.

RHT3
02-06-2007, 01:54 PM
I'm 39.

I just bought an' 05 RSVR Factory. I've owned Ducati Pasos, Ducati 900SS, Yamaha FZR 1000, Ducati 916, Yamaha R1 [stock], Yamaha R1 [highly modified], MV Agusta F4, Aprilia RSV Mille and now the Factory.

You'll notice I didn't say Ducati 1098. Why? Because, after owning the RSV Mille, I realized that [for me] Aprilias are better street bikes than comparable Ducatis. Also, they have more personality than comparable japanese sportbikes.

I decided I wanted the best Aprilia sportbike. For me, the RSVR is it.

The RSVR is smooth-running, happy as a street bike and not intimidating to ride. Pride of ownership is high. So is reliability.

I say go for the Ape.

alex59
02-06-2007, 02:21 PM
Torque equals acceleration and thats what you,l get out of the Aprilia a completley different power to the in-line 4,s.
You will out run many jap bikes due to the torque and will love it but you can,t beat ther overall top end HP of a 4 due to extra cylinders ect.

This is my second owned Aprilia in the RSV models and will buy the next model again when it comes out.
IT is ultra reliable , cheap to service than the Duke and of better quality & finish than the 1098 , so thats why the 1098 is now priced close to the Aprilia due to in roads in sales that Aprilia has taken of Ducati for better value for money and the equipment the bike comes with ect.

Also the triumph 675 is a top bike but a little on the small size for power never the less agood bike.

Its over to you now so make up yuor mind and go for it.

Alex Melb Aust:aussie:

Stevie.P
02-06-2007, 02:57 PM
I'm looking to get a new bike soon and keep coming back to the RSV (used 04-05). My history is on a SV650S for the past five years and 30,000 miles, I'm 27. The Aprilia is obviously a much more focused machine than the SV. I'm not the fastest guy out there but I do understand (and don't overly push) my abilities.I only started riding at 25, am 29 now and had a year out due to money.
I have only had 2 bikes, my first a honda CBR900 the second RSVR1000 '06model.

All I can say is the rsvr is a bit of a handfull in the wet with all that Torque, but there is also a lot of grip and a hell of a lot of control on the front Brake.

As the other guys said it only goes as fast as you twist the throttle.
Its an amazing bike and can be very embarrasing for a GSXR rider with 30 more BHP to be left standing at the lights.

BHP = RPM(speed) x Torque(turning power).

Aprilia (v60 rotax) torque is high at low RPM, therefore more accelleration. BHP figures are lower as it is a lower reving engine.

Morgan
02-06-2007, 03:29 PM
Hey - you sound like you're thoughtful about the whole issue so go for it ;)

I owned an SV650S too - loved that little racer despite its cheap build, tendency to rust etc etc.

The transition from an SV650S isn't a huge one; you'll know how to handle a V-twin and won't go all out mental with the throttle and end up upside-down. The biggest difference I find is in town riding, or motorway filtering. The SV is a beauty,carving inside the town. The Aprilia growls like a pent-up lion waiting to get out.

Weight-wise, it's pretty much of the same. The seat of the RSVR splays my legs out a little more, whereas the SV, some times it feels like I'm sitting on a monkeybike.

Steering - is a blessing! You'll find the SV crude; as is its brakes; dampening, everything. But there won't be any transition problem moving up to an RSVR. Self-discipline is the hardest bit (I'm still finding).

Being 27, you might have a task with insurance. I couldn't afford an RSVR at that age - so I had to wait till now ;)

Good luck.

falconeight
02-06-2007, 05:58 PM
I also just purchased a RSV, I moved up from 4 years on a 748S before that I rode a zx7r 4 years and a zx6 1 year. I have been riding the RSV for a month now and here is what I have noticed. The two best features are the handling and the brakes, they make the bike very easy to ride and ride fast...comfortably. I have ridden many bikes and with the exeption of the GSXR750 I have not been on a more rider friendly bike. I wish I would of skipped the 748S(that fucker tried to kill me) and went straight for the RSV.

Morgan
02-06-2007, 06:55 PM
I wish I would of skipped the 748S(that fucker tried to kill me) and went straight for the RSV.

Lol! Falcon - you sound worse than a guy on the rebound with bad memories from his ex-. What did she do?

The 748 looks like one of the sexiest race bikes ever built! It had crossed my mind, but ultimately it was the rider position which I didn't like (same issue with the 999 series).

falconeight
02-06-2007, 10:18 PM
Lol! Falcon - you sound worse than a guy on the rebound with bad memories from his ex-. What did she do?

The 748 looks like one of the sexiest race bikes ever built! It had crossed my mind, but ultimately it was the rider position which I didn't like (same issue with the 999 series).

You will never believe it until you own one, but Ducatis have attitude problems. One day they will not start, the next they'll shoot the clutch into your car. But the time it tried to kill me I had put it into neutral the light came on and everything. As I was getting of it went into neutral and pinned me against the gas pump. If it was not for other customers I would still be their. I hate that bike!!

Kemuri
02-07-2007, 01:22 AM
You're looking at some great bikes. I've ridden them all and each have strong points. Here's my subjective breakdown,

The Big Twin Aprilia - Best all rounder of the bunch from tracking, canyon, and daily driving. Usable power everywhere so urban grinding on the bike is easy, I like having power on tap to pull away from incoming cages. Not too much of a rack for long hauls but you can definitely crawl under the paint when desired. Not as emotional nor as much soul as a Ducati but then the Rotax engine has loads more in the reliability department. Aftermarket parts and customization are minimal but then the bike is pretty damn good out of the box. Service is a concern if you're confined to a asshat technician but I'm lucky to have options. Only other issue I've had is cheese ball electronics - my dash resets too often but then italians don't do electronics.

GSXR 750 - The best preformance oriented platform of the bunch. Japanese attention to detail and engineering are pretty tough to beat. The package is the closest thing to the new MotoGP format with middle weight handling and liter bike punch. Huge aftermarket selection and you could definitely make one of these unique with superb handling and blistering fast. My knees felt a bit high on the stock config but again aftermarket rearsets would probably remedy this. Definitely power on tap everywhere and service would not be an issue. Not as much in the soul and exclusivity department unless you consider an angry kitchen blender soulful but who needs soul when all they see is your rear tire.

675 - Very impressive little bike . . . loads of power for a six, great egros, awesome sound and vibe. Razor handling, a little light up front but easily remedied with a damper. Top of the line fit and finish, best dash layout of the bunch. Smooth transmission, wasn't selected as bike of the year for nothing. Ample aftermarket parts and service issues seem minimal.

If I was in the market I'd still take my Aprilia. Quality everywhere other than aforementioned electrical issues, soul and has been good to me in all riding circumstances. I occasionally ride some long hauls from LA to SF or Arizona and the liter engine makes this more comfortable. That said, I look forward to adding a 675 to my garage. There are times in the tight canyons where I miss the flick ability of a smaller ride. The 675 has the vibe and performance to embarrass the bigger bikes. While the 750 offers the best platform for all out numbers, I'm no where near riding in an environment requiring tapping the performance barriers on any of these in stock form. The rider makes the bike - so many get hung up on magazine numbers. Perhaps if track only was the duty this would be my choice along with the R6 - parts also cheaper and more plentiful an ebay. You can't go wrong with any of these, choose the one that moves you and enjoy. Don't worry about stepping up to a liter as long as you ride with common sense, in fact all of these require restraint in the street. Just another opinion for you to mull.

Beau1K
02-07-2007, 01:30 AM
At the end of the day, I control the throttle but in your opinion would going to an RSV too big of a jump?

HELL NO! Get that shit! You will love it - I PROMISE :D

I came off a VStar 650 (1st bike) and got the Ape - 2nd bike...I got it with basically about 5K miles of riding experience and let me tell you...it's everything you've been missing on the SV650 ;)

Dr. Thrillride
02-07-2007, 02:28 AM
HELL NO! Get that shit! You will love it - I PROMISE :D

I came off a VStar 650 (1st bike) and got the Ape - 2nd bike...I got it with basically about 5K miles of riding experience and let me tell you...it's everything you've been missing on the SV650 ;)

a v-star?, a v-star?...gittarope

MASHMAN
02-07-2007, 05:07 AM
My 2 cents i guess. I've just spent the last weekend cruisin around some of the best roads i've ever seen and ridden on. From tight tight tighter (oh shit almost got that wrong) twisties, to lovely free flowing fast fast (oh shit is it gonna let go on me) corners.

The one bike that was constantly ahead of me (at the start of the tour) was the SV650S, until i learned to ride the RSV. Essentially I picked up tips and advice to cure my ultra crap riding style and then saw the edge more often than not. My setup has way too many rings showing, so handling is pretty bloody quick on my bike. But after a getting to know you session or about 700k's of road, i found that bar the tightest of twisties and loaded with a ventura rack with a big Jays bag on the back I was able to not only chase down the 650, but also to spank it's little yellow butt in all but the tightest, and i mean 20k's tight (where 1st gear was just too much of a new territory thing for me to throw around), of twisties.

I come from a ZXR400 background and made the leap to the RSV and know that i'll never look elsewhere for a bike. Once you get used to how to ride the RSV (if you're a seasoned rider it'll be a damn sight quicker than I learned), you'll find that you'll be able to hang on to the 6's, if not rape them (which i couldn't quite manage on too much of a regular basis), attack the corners with a confidence that I never felt I would ever have and walk away with a seriously sore arse and the biggest smile on your face you can get without any man to man contact.

I did ride the 650 for about 30 mins, i looked at corners and it threw itself at them, but i felt I missed that low down, i'm comin out of a corner with the sole purpose of turning everything in front of me to dots in my mirrors lift off that the RSV gives.

If you ride anything other than super tight twisties. Get the RSV.

Again, just my 2 cents from very close quarters

Mash

bme61679
02-07-2007, 10:14 AM
Thanks for all the insight guys, great advice. Each of the three have their positive/negative aspects but the one that I keep coming back to is the RSV.

Frostea
02-07-2007, 10:18 AM
I rode for a few years when i was younger early 20's i used to have a cbr f4 but do to my craziness back then i sold it cause i wasnt responcible enought back then. then back in 03 i went and bought a Kawi 636 and modded it all up. kept and rode it for three years, i just sold it last year and bought a new RSVR. All i can say the Twin Power for me anyways is so much more fun except for the fact the the Braking on my Kawi blew the RSVR's away i could stop that thing so easy and quick and the fact it was 50lbs or so lighter.
The Power on the RSVR seems more comfortable to control than the Japs i seems much mellower when taking off and the ride is great.
Im 33 now and have a 4 year old so i very much keep my end under control it everyone else in cars i worry about doing me in.

ckruzel
02-07-2007, 02:13 PM
if you like the handling of the sv650, you'll love the rsvr, its got great handling and so much more, brembo brakes, steel braided lines, tractor like low end power and its stable and predictable at speeds

nicko_316
02-08-2007, 07:05 AM
I'm only 23 and i got my RSVR about 3 months ago. I'm so happy i got this over a jap bike.

I've only owned an Aprilia RS250 prior to the RSVR so i cant comment on the jap bikes. But one thing is for sure is the big jap bike riders still jealous of the RSVR!

go the beat of the v-twin mate

live2ride
02-08-2007, 01:11 PM
I'm looking to get a new bike soon and keep coming back to the RSV (used 04-05). My history is on a SV650S for the past five years and 30,000 miles, I'm 27. The Aprilia is obviously a much more focused machine than the SV. I'm not the fastest guy out there but I do understand (and don't overly push) my abilities.

Hi
I’m 24 & had a RSV for about 6 month, (falco and a Honda before that).
I think you guys are missing an important point. The most powerful part you need to be careful is not only the throttle but the BRAKES as well.:bond:
The one on the RSV is very powerful, far more than the SV. You can get into a tank slap by locking up the front at 15mph just as easily as if the bike is traveling at 100mph. Especially when the RSV doesn't come with a steering damper.
Believe me, I had personal experience.:bangwall:
As long as you treat her with respect and take it easy. You wouldn’t stop :happy: when you ride her. Plus it looks a million time better than the sv or the GSXR.
Mind you, its not as good looking as the Tornado, but that is another matter.

derrickhackman
02-08-2007, 01:20 PM
i don't know about locking the front ... perhaps with wrong braking technique but with the proper squeeze, then squeeze hard braking method you should never lock the front... unless you are on something slippery or you are breaking at lean.

a light squeeze to load the front then once loaded do all your breaking.

if you stab the brake all at once you will lock it because the weight did not transfer to the front and you don't have the weight to work with the contact patch.

i wouldn't be afraid of the bike ... just be mindful that she needs to be ridden with intent and purpose and not willy-nilly carefree crap.

live2ride
02-08-2007, 01:36 PM
Ya that’s true.
But you don’t tend to think about light squeeze; big squeeze and light squeeze. When some blind bat in a car pulls out 10 feet in front of you. :mad:
The road was slippery, it was a left hand bend and the bike was on a new pair of tyre with 3 miles on it.:pissed:
Oh and I had Flip Flop and Fly (Blues Brothers) playing on my ipod at the time as well. Come to think of it, I almost did flip flop and fly.:happy:
So if you are riding this time of the year, please becaful out there.:worship:

derrickhackman
02-08-2007, 01:42 PM
a panic-stop is something you cannot really even properly manage and will lock the front even on a bicycle.

in fact, if you feel you have to panic-stop, it is better to swerve because you have a chance at getting around the incident upright. if you grab a handful of break you are pretty much doomed.

RSV Racing
02-08-2007, 03:10 PM
Depends. If you have quick reactions and don't get nervous when the front locks up, you might be able to get away with it. As soon as the tire locks up, just release pressure and get the bike up right and you will probably get away with it.

I have had a couple of panic stops because someone pulled out in front and had nowhere to go, and as soon as I locked it up, I released the brakes and strained out the bike and was good. The funny thing is, I reacted by grabbing the brakes as an instinct, but was able to realize what I was doing and let go in an instant.

I have been lucky quite a few times.

:burnout: :burnout:

dragan
02-08-2007, 03:30 PM
I came off of a gsxr-750 to my RSVR. The suzi was a great bike and very fun on the top end. Compared to the RSVR it was very sterile and the lean angles I can get on the RSVR are alot deeper than I could get on the GSXR. In normal street riding the RSVR blows away the GSXR and it still not an uncontrollable monster. Either way you'll be happy, but if you get an RSVR you'll never want to go back to a jap bike.

Morgan
02-09-2007, 08:41 PM
You will never believe it until you own one, but Ducatis have attitude problems. One day they will not start, the next they'll shoot the clutch into your car. But the time it tried to kill me I had put it into neutral the light came on and everything. As I was getting of it went into neutral and pinned me against the gas pump. If it was not for other customers I would still be their. I hate that bike!!

Sounds like a real problem with the dry Duke clutches. Was yours a pre-Texas electronics Ducati? I heard they improved a lot thereafter. I kind of still admire the iconic shape of the 998/996/748 series. I had to buy a scale 1:24 model only because I couldn't bring myself to face owning one (with all the tempermental probs. you've described). Glad you got out of that alive - although I have hit my Factory 06' in to first gear whilst trying to knock down the side-stand with those stoopid Alpinestars SMX Plus boots. They are the most lethal boots ever designed. The extra bump snagged the neutral into first. Only just saved it from a left panel paint job.



Ya that’s true.
But you don’t tend to think about light squeeze; big squeeze and light squeeze. When some blind bat in a car pulls out 10 feet in front of you.
The road was slippery, it was a left hand bend and the bike was on a new pair of tyre with 3 miles on it.
Oh and I had Flip Flop and Fly (Blues Brothers) playing on my ipod at the time as well. Come to think of it, I almost did flip flop and fly.
So if you are riding this time of the year, please becaful out there.

Crikes. Why on earth are you listening to an iPod on your motorcycle? In London of all places? The RSVR front brake is fantastic compared to the dribble of a back brake. I find that in emergency-beware-of-the-numpty-driver-brake-stops that I tend to be too cautious with the RSVR. Rather than risk doing a stoppie I end up dragging a little more. The SV just doesn't have a fantastic stopping distance. It is going to fishtail/eject pilot and do everything that a cheaper bike is prone to. I still think the RSVR is easier and safer to brake on, than an SV650s with those awful Metzler stock tyres.

X-CBR MAN
02-09-2007, 09:17 PM
I am on my second Aprilia. The motor is sweet honey and solid. I am 50 and it ain't to much for me. Last ticket was up in the hill 130 in a 55, honestly I didn't see him and it took him like 10 minutes to catch up to me. Damn did I just say that?

Beau1K
02-09-2007, 10:44 PM
a v-star?, a v-star?...gittarope

I know...I know...I didn't want to admit it but there ya go :rolleyes: As if I knew any better...it was my first bike :bangwall:

MASHMAN
02-10-2007, 01:27 AM
The front brakes are outstanding. I've only just learned how to use them and it seems that for any form of braking you only need 2 fingers, full stop. If i'm trailing into, or on the brakes through a corner 1 finger seems to leave the bike upright and not weaving like a pissed side winder. This seemed to work across a wide range of speeds, from 55 - 225... Either way, learn how to use them and it'll become second nature and you'll realise that they are more forgiving than you give them credit for...

Mash