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Thread: The Last Ride

  1. #31
    apriliaforum expert Axecent's Avatar
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    Code's schools

    I've been through 4 levels of his school, and although the laws of diminishing returns apply somewhat, the first 2 levels are optimal for street riders. One of the drills I found most valuable was his off line circulation...several laps hugging one side of the track, then several more hugging the other. As the pace was stepped up, a new comfort for heretofore less comfortable areas of the road is discovered, and that helps keep the nervous factor down that results in many street riders thinking about that front brake (nee crash) lever. Like a gunfighter, as the nerves start acting up, the un-trained rider hovers his fingers over that lever like it was just above the 6 shooter in a gunfight, waiting for the "draw". Training takes away the excuse to go for the brakes and the confidence to turn through the corner while looking up the road.

    I race CMRA now, years after my Code schools, and after finding that my times were not improving much at tracks like Texas World Speedway, I started going up to a small track in East Texas called Oak Hill Raceway. Narrow, hilly, technical and tight, a few days of riding that track resulted in my return to wider tracks and discovering how many more lines exisited for passing and exiting turns. Recently, several racers opined that OHR may be one of the best training tracks around. Considering Schwantz, the Haydens, Ben Spies and Colin Edwards all learned on that track, I think there is something to that.

  2. #32
    apriliaforum expert Jet City Racer's Avatar
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    While cornering techniques/body positioning vary from dirt to street, they are excellent tools at learning what a bike does when it gets out of shape. I took an off ramp on a Yamaha Venture Royal and when I was braking the front end hit oil and abruptly started to push/tuck. Due to my dirt bike riding experience I was able to react and correct it before I was on the ground. Same things apply to gravel in the road, spinning back tire, running over debrit, etc.......

    Survival instincts when in a panic situation are your worst enemy. The brain wants to see what the hazard is, plus it tells you to stop before you hit it. Ignore these signals. Look away from the hazard while searching for an escape route, and most importantly, TRY to make the turn even if you don't think you can unless there is sufficient runoff to go straight. Panic "freezing" kills riders every day.

    I am still very greatful to be able to read this thread. 4 years ago TODAY I was airlifted to Stanford after a crash that should have taken my life. Three months in the hospital and a permanent limp was enough to get me to slow down on the street.

    Ride safe!!!
    "Racing is life. Anything that happens before or after is just waiting." Steve McQueen

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  3. #33
    apriliaforum expert vito's Avatar
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    happy anniversary, jet!!

  4. #34
    apriliaforum expert Stu_O's Avatar
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    Originally posted by azmotogirl
    Absolutely agree about dirt bikes: the best way to learn riding, and never too late. When people ask me what's the best way to learn to ride motorcycle, I usually say: get yourself a dirt bike first,
    ride at least for a season, build up confidence, and then make a transiton toward street riding.
    Good advice. But as you know, we have a bunch of Johnny-come-lately macho morons in Scottsdale and Fountain Hills. You know... the yuppies who buy a Fat Boy as their first bike and ride with absolutely no protective gear. Can you imagine showing up at Harold's on Sunday morning on a dirt bike? OMG, what would the cool dudes think? These are the clowns, IMO, who are driving up the over-40 accident stats.

    BTW motogirl, Lee Parks will be teaching his Advanced Rider Clinic at the Glendale MSF facility on January 29th. This might be a good opportunity for all AZ riders to brush up on their skills and shed some bad habits. I'll be there for sure.

    Stu O

  5. #35
    apriliaforum expert Jet City Racer's Avatar
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    Originally posted by vito
    happy anniversary, jet!!
    Thanks Vito.
    I'm wondering when someone posts a reply asking me to stop refering to that crash. I'll be glad to respond with this:

    "Glad I'm alive to piss you off!"
    "Racing is life. Anything that happens before or after is just waiting." Steve McQueen

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  6. #36
    apriliaforum expert Ignite Aprilia's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Jet City Racer
    Thanks Vito.
    I'm wondering when someone posts a reply asking me to stop refering to that crash. I'll be glad to respond with this:

    "Glad I'm alive to piss you off!"
    So then what the hell happened, ribs, spine? must have been nasty and what track did this happen on, I must know!!

    ps i am a newb
    Last edited by Ignite Aprilia; 01-01-2005 at 11:52 AM.

  7. #37
    apriliaforum expert Jet City Racer's Avatar
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    "Racing is life. Anything that happens before or after is just waiting." Steve McQueen

    JET CITY RACING
    Faster than the speed of darkness!


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  8. #38
    apriliaforum Junkie disgrace9's Avatar
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    Austrian motorcyle manufacturer KTM is considering its future in the Dakar rally following the death of Italian rider Fabrizio Meoni on Tuesday. Race organisers cancelled Wednesday's 12th stage following Meoni's death, with the competitors flying straight to Bamako for the next stage.



    Pay your tribute to Fabrizio Meoni
    DAKAR 2005: Riders mourn Fabrizio Meoni

    KTM issued a statement in which it urged all its riders to withdraw from this year's race, although it said it was up to individuals to decide whether or not to continue.

    Meoni, twice a former Dakar winner, died from a heart attack after a crash during stage 11. His death came a day after Spanish KTM rider Jose Manuel Perez, who crashed during a stage last week, died from his injuries in hospital.

    In September French KTM rider Richard Sainct, a three times former winner of the Dakar rally, died after a crash in the Pharaohs Rally.

    "Since KTM has lost two of its best rally riders, Fabrizio Meoni and Richard Sainct, in fatal accidents within a period of only a few months, the manufacturer will be contemplating its future support for the rally sport," KTM said.

    KTM is the dominant bike manufacturer in the race and nine of the top 10 finishers in Tuesday's stage were on KTM machines.

    KTM's sporting director Heinz Kinigadner told the Austrian APA news agency on Wednesday: "I am personally of the opinion that all KTM riders should return home.

    "It's tragic and it hurts. Before the start of the Dakar I asked him (Meoni) whether he would like to manage the KTM teams in the future.

    "Pulling out of the rally isn't just a question of sympathy but also one of safety because no-one in the team can just ignore two such tragic accidents.

    "The Dakar is not a walk in the park. In my opinion it makes no sense to continue, but that is just my personal opinion."

    Meoni, 47, had said before the race that it would be his last Dakar.

    KTM's French rider Cyril Despres, who leads the motorcyle standings, is to display a sticker on his windshield with Meoni's name and start number of 4 on it as a tribute to the Italian, who was second in the race standings before Tuesday's accident...

  9. #39
    apriliaforum expert Jet City Racer's Avatar
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    Godspeed Meoni and Perez.

    Last year AFM racer Bill Fordyce had a hard crash that stopped his heart when he slammed his chest into the fuel tank. Fortunately the corner worker new CPR and was able to bring him back before the Ambulance made it to the scene.

    It was her first day EVER being a corner worker.

    Thank you to all the corner workers around the world!!!
    "Racing is life. Anything that happens before or after is just waiting." Steve McQueen

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  10. #40
    apriliaforum expert millietant's Avatar
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    I realise that everyone takes risks when they ride and that everyone thinks they way they do things are the best, but I must say I worry about riders in the US. My wife's family all live in the US and her brother's (3 of them) were all keen on getting bikes, but Liz's parents wouldn't hear of it. When her youngest brother finally talked them round, he did the training/test for his license (said the hardest part was finding an ATM for the payment), passed and went out to ride on his CBR 600. Liz's father was so worried about his lack of training that he sent him over to the UK to do the UK test.

    I have to say, Chris was ignorant of some of the most basics of safe riding and without further training would not have been able even to pass the test we have to pass in the UK before we can ride a 50cc (restricted to 30mph) moped, legally, on our roads.

    Over the 2 weeks of training, to the standard required to progress onto a 33 bhp machine, Chris 's riding skills and safety improved to point where he was no longer an accident looking for a place to happen.

    from what I still see today when I visit, the skill levels required in the US to be licensed to ride a bike in the US still seem to be very rudimentary and I would applaud all of the magazines who preach the gospel of MSF etc.

    As I sometimes hear people say over there in the good old US of A, with Freedom comes Responsibility (Common sense is regularly though, sadly lacking!!!!).
    Cheers,

    "I am a selfish, self-righteous tosser", a "fucking loser" and now an "absolute fucking idiot"

    Me - '03 RSV Mille, '89 FJ 1200 x 2, & '75 TL 125 & Schweizer S300 CBi Helicopter
    Wife - '01 FZ1 (Fazer 1000), '86 VF 750 Interceptor and '07 CRF 230F
    Kids - '03 Fazer 600, GY 125 and CRF 100 off roaders, '10 Reiju RS2 50 Matrix Pro

  11. #41
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    My first vehicle after turning 16 was a Honda 500. I had been riding off road since the 5th grade. I thought I was pretty fast on the road and started amature road racing and found out just how much there was to learn. After two years of racing I stopped street riding because of my increased street riding skills. I just knew that my improved abilities would get me in to trouble riding on uncontrolled roads. I went back to riding off road for about 10 years. I am now riding both street and dirt and am surprised at how much different they are. Elbows in elbows out, don't mind sliding my dirt bike. Sliding my street bike? Oh shit. Does off road really help? Yea somewhat.
    But I still don't want to lose traction on my street bike.

  12. #42
    apriliaforum expert williamr's Avatar
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    Cyclebrain -

    It's not your impropved street skills that get you into trouble, it's your lack of them.

    What you are calling street is what I think we call circuit. Street is real roads with traffic. Circuit skills are tied up with control, line, braking points and such.

    The skills you need on the street include all of these but add defensive skills, and lines modified for visibility, plus the kind of slow speed control which is of no value at all on the track. Another useful skill is that of riding fast and still keeping your licence.

    Rob

  13. #43
    apriliaforum expert millietant's Avatar
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    Isn't it just amazing - 16yrs old and can legally ride a 500.

    Over here 16yrs old gets you on the road on a 30mph moped - after compulsory training & test.

    17yrs old gets you a 12bhp 125, until you pass your "full" test, after which you can ride a bike with the phenomenal max power output of 33bhp until you're 21 yrs old, when if you've survived, you can actually go out and buy a serious bike.

    Don't really know which system is better, both have their downsides - but my kids are both getting dirt bike experience and will be well capable of controlling a bike long before the law lets them out on the street. Even then, I might not let them, because the streets are filled with brainless cagers using mobile phones while "driving" (and I use that term loosely!!).

    Cheers
    Cheers,

    "I am a selfish, self-righteous tosser", a "fucking loser" and now an "absolute fucking idiot"

    Me - '03 RSV Mille, '89 FJ 1200 x 2, & '75 TL 125 & Schweizer S300 CBi Helicopter
    Wife - '01 FZ1 (Fazer 1000), '86 VF 750 Interceptor and '07 CRF 230F
    Kids - '03 Fazer 600, GY 125 and CRF 100 off roaders, '10 Reiju RS2 50 Matrix Pro

  14. #44
    apriliaforum expert vito's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by millietant
    I realise that everyone takes risks when they ride and that everyone thinks they way they do things are the best, but I must say I worry about riders in the US. My wife's family all live in the US and her brother's (3 of them) were all keen on getting bikes, but Liz's parents wouldn't hear of it. When her youngest brother finally talked them round, he did the training/test for his license (said the hardest part was finding an ATM for the payment), passed and went out to ride on his CBR 600. Liz's father was so worried about his lack of training that he sent him over to the UK to do the UK test.

    I have to say, Chris was ignorant of some of the most basics of safe riding and without further training would not have been able even to pass the test we have to pass in the UK before we can ride a 50cc (restricted to 30mph) moped, legally, on our roads.

    Over the 2 weeks of training, to the standard required to progress onto a 33 bhp machine, Chris 's riding skills and safety improved to point where he was no longer an accident looking for a place to happen.

    from what I still see today when I visit, the skill levels required in the US to be licensed to ride a bike in the US still seem to be very rudimentary and I would applaud all of the magazines who preach the gospel of MSF etc.

    As I sometimes hear people say over there in the good old US of A, with Freedom comes Responsibility (Common sense is regularly though, sadly lacking!!!!).
    when i first started riding (ok, ok it was the 60's) a car license was all you needed to ride a bike. they assumed if you could drive a car you could surely ride a bike.

    i passed some very simple test in the early 70's, then quit riding during the 80's and 90's. when i got back into bikes i was pleasantly surprised to find that i had unwittingly been renewing my motorcyle license, so i have never been tested since 1971 or so. but i'm a good rider. honest officer.

  15. #45
    apriliaforum prov-nov shep's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1bigdawg
    I know that vision is the key but I have found a small change (and I mean small) has an effect on the exit of a corner or even when you are going straight. Since I am riding in the city and there are lines to focus on. I have found that focusing on the line or approximately 6" on either side of the line will make a difference in my exit on a corner. Three separate exits, 1 if I look at the line, 1 if I look 6" inside the line and the last if I look 6" outside the line. Now the place I exit may be minimal in relationship to each other but there is a difference and sometime you just need a few more inches in one direction or another.
    A quality of natural aim that open-sight archers and dart players know well - the smaller the point you aim at the tighter your group.



    Quote Originally Posted by millietant
    Isn't it just amazing - 16yrs old and can legally ride a 500.

    Over here 16yrs old gets you on the road on a 30mph moped - after compulsory training & test.

    17yrs old gets you a 12bhp 125, until you pass your "full" test, after which you can ride a bike with the phenomenal max power output of 33bhp until you're 21 yrs old, when if you've survived, you can actually go out and buy a serious bike.

    Don't really know which system is better, both have their downsides - but my kids are both getting dirt bike experience and will be well capable of controlling a bike long before the law lets them out on the street. Even then, I might not let them, because the streets are filled with brainless cagers using mobile phones while "driving" (and I use that term loosely!!).
    A 500? In the states a 16-year-old can legally ride a Hyabusa – IF he can buy the insurance.

    My 18-year-old started expressing an interest in riding a year or so ago. My bad influence, no doubt, he’s normally (and thankfully) pretty risk-averse for a teenage male. My criteria for taking up street riding:

    1) Ride the dirt until you can complete a decent circuit

    2) Read “Proficient Motorcycling”, cover-to-cover (there WILL be a quiz).

    3) Clock a couple of hours riding pillion with Dad.

    4) Complete MSF Beginning Rider course.

    5) Nothing bigger than a 650 to start.

    6) Pay your own way – bike, insurance, full armored gear.

    7) Clock some time riding next to Dad.

    Needless to say, I’m hoping he can’t do it. I share your same sentiments about American cagers – they were barely competent BEFORE they started talking on the phone whilst “driving” (note pic in sig below ;-)
    Last edited by shep; 02-22-2005 at 04:44 PM.
    Steve
    99ZX11/03Tuono
    Ride with immaculate sanity

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