Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Nemo 2 chain oiler

  1. #1
    apriliaforum newb Mike_in_nh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    20

    Nemo 2 chain oiler

    I was just wondering if anyone has ever used a bike mounted chain oiler,
    I've never used one, do they actually work?
    Would be trick if they did...

  2. #2
    apriliaforum Junkie
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Toronto, ON, Canada
    Posts
    379
    I had Pro-Oiler on '12 and now running it on '17. Properly tuned, it works very well. Real time saver on long multi-days trips. But, if your main use of the bike is short, quick, single day rides - I wouldn't bother installing any chain oiler. Also, on '17 you can't use speed sensor to feed signal into the oiler - you have to install a magnet sensor, or buy GPS add-on. I went with a magnet, 'cause it sounds more reliable.

  3. #3
    apriliaforum newb Mike_in_nh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    20
    Great info, thanks for posting.

  4. #4
    apriliaforum Member bigrog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Malta
    Posts
    148
    I have used Scottoiler on three of my bikes, but still thinking about the TF. They are not perfect because I find it very difficult to regulate the oil flow. Also no matter how hard I have tried it is impossible to contain the oil fling. This results in plastering the rear rim with oil over a longer period of riding. It must also get onto the tyre, but other than slight run off from the rim to the bead section of the tyre I have never really seen (or felt) the resultant evidence of this happening. Scottoiler themselves admit that it is not possible to stop the oil fling since it is caused by general airflow turbulance at the rear of the bike.

    Having said all that, on balance I do find an oiler convenient and it puts my mind at rest that the chain is being oiled. That in itself is often a matter for debate, since on a modern chain the oil can not actually get to lubricate the link pins since the O-rings seal the plates to the links. So it would seem that all the oil is really doing is stopping the chain from rusting and possibly lubricating the O-rings themselves.
    The Third Law of Human Dynamics: For every opportunity to communicate there is an equal and opposite opportunity to misunderstand

  5. #5
    apriliaforum newb Mike_in_nh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    20
    Your point of not being able to control the flow of oil and making a giant mess everywhere was definitely a concern of mine. The link is the one I was looking at http://Www.cobrra.co.uk it only oils when the cap is rotated.

    I understand the o-ring thing, have you noticed any improvement with sprocket wear or chain stretch?

    Thanks

  6. #6
    apriliaforum Member bigrog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Malta
    Posts
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike_in_nh View Post
    Your point of not being able to control the flow of oil and making a giant mess everywhere was definitely a concern of mine. The link is the one I was looking at http://Www.cobrra.co.uk it only oils when the cap is rotated.

    I understand the o-ring thing, have you noticed any improvement with sprocket wear or chain stretch?

    Thanks
    I can't really say that I have experienced any great advantage over manual oiling, because I have always looked after chains whatever. Intuitively sticky spray on lubricants will tend to gather grit which must have a detrimental wear effect, but for me an automatic system is more of a convenience thing. Looking at the Cobrra I don't see that convenience since you have to intervene far too often, particularly when you stop. Maybe an electronic monitoring system like the Pro-Oiler is a better solution, perhaps "ZR1000A1" can help with the oil fling? When touring I always carry plenty of surgical type rubber gloves and tissues, then I generally wipe the wheel rim at each petrol or food stop if it gets bad.
    The Third Law of Human Dynamics: For every opportunity to communicate there is an equal and opposite opportunity to misunderstand

  7. #7
    apriliaforum Junkie
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Toronto, ON, Canada
    Posts
    379
    Quote Originally Posted by bigrog View Post
    I can't really say that I have experienced any great advantage over manual oiling, because I have always looked after chains whatever. Intuitively sticky spray on lubricants will tend to gather grit which must have a detrimental wear effect, but for me an automatic system is more of a convenience thing. Looking at the Cobrra I don't see that convenience since you have to intervene far too often, particularly when you stop. Maybe an electronic monitoring system like the Pro-Oiler is a better solution, perhaps "ZR1000A1" can help with the oil fling? When touring I always carry plenty of surgical type rubber gloves and tissues, then I generally wipe the wheel rim at each petrol or food stop if it gets bad.
    Absolutely agree - automatic oiler is mostly a convenience thing. I tour alone sometimes and lubing the chain without center stand is not what I wanna do after long day of riding.

    Everyone should understand: with any oiler there will always be some fling-off, because it's a "total-loss" lubrication system - what goes onto the chain also comes off it. But with Pro-Oiler (or similar system) you should properly adjust it to minimize fling-off and still have a chain slightly lubricated. With modern O/X-ring chains, you don't need oil bath, 1 drop of oil every ~5 miles is more than enough!

  8. #8
    apriliaforum newb Mike_in_nh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by bigrog View Post
    I can't really say that I have experienced any great advantage over manual oiling, because I have always looked after chains whatever. Intuitively sticky spray on lubricants will tend to gather grit which must have a detrimental wear effect, but for me an automatic system is more of a convenience thing. Looking at the Cobrra I don't see that convenience since you have to intervene far too often, particularly when you stop. Maybe an electronic monitoring system like the Pro-Oiler is a better solution, perhaps "ZR1000A1" can help with the oil fling? When touring I always carry plenty of surgical type rubber gloves and tissues, then I generally wipe the wheel rim at each petrol or food stop if it gets bad.
    Quote Originally Posted by ZR1000A1 View Post
    Absolutely agree - automatic oiler is mostly a convenience thing. I tour alone sometimes and lubing the chain without center stand is not what I wanna do after long day of riding.

    Everyone should understand: with any oiler there will always be some fling-off, because it's a "total-loss" lubrication system - what goes onto the chain also comes off it. But with Pro-Oiler (or similar system) you should properly adjust it to minimize fling-off and still have a chain slightly lubricated. With modern O/X-ring chains, you don't need oil bath, 1 drop of oil every ~5 miles is more than enough!
    Thanks guys for your input, it all makes perfect sense.

Similar Threads

  1. Chain oiler (Pro-oiler)
    By f_capo in forum ETV1000 CapoNord (2001-2007)
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 06-30-2005, 02:16 PM
  2. Electronic chain oiler on an 04
    By Thunder Factory in forum RSVR and RSVR Factory (2004-2009)
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 01-20-2004, 07:23 PM
  3. chain oiler
    By Simon Barton in forum RS125 Euro-archive
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-13-2003, 08:37 AM
  4. Chain Oiler
    By pistonslap in forum ETV1000 CapoNord (2001-2007)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-17-2003, 12:50 AM
  5. Scottoiler - Chain oiler for fuel injected model
    By Jon CAKE in forum Pegaso 650 Cube and IE
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-08-2002, 10:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •