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Thread: How to Have Both Headlights On on Sportcity

  1. #1
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    How to Have Both Headlights On on Sportcity

    Well he is my small contribution to the site.

    Well this is how I did the mod to have both headlights on, all you need i a piece of wire, maybe a thicker paper clip will do too.

    First unscrew the 2 screws that close together the headlight/signal switch. Once you separate them in side you will see 3 plugs (signals, hi/lo and horn). The first one on top which is connected to the hi/lo beam is what you need to work on. Simply unplug it so you have enough slack to work on it and bridge the 2 center wires together with a wire or a paper clip. Then plug back on, put everything back together. Thats it, all done
    1st pic is wire used
    2nd pic is size and bend of wire I used. I basically bend the wire in a "U" shape and did the little circles at the tips.
    3rd pic is what wires to bridge on the plug
    4th pic is the result
    When putting on the high beam both headlights are on.
    When its on low beam only one Headlight is on.

    Easy peasy, even a caveman can do it!!!

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    If the white is not the positive lead and the rest just switched grounds then I would put a few wraps of electrical tape over the head of the plug to cover the bare wire and to help prevent vibrations from knocking it loose.

    When my dad was around we couldn't get away with that type of mod as the WWII Wire Chief kept us on our toes and would only allow that as a temporary fix to get you home where you could do a proper soldered in splice that would be guaranteed to last for years.

    What does the voltage drop to at the switch and at the battery when the passing lights are on and then with the extra draw of the cooling fan when it turns on?
    Last edited by Rockynv; 10-29-2011 at 01:22 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockynv View Post
    If the white is not the positive lead and the rest just switched grounds then I would put a few wraps of electrical tape over the head of the plug to cover the bare wire and to help prevent vibrations from knocking it loose.

    When my dad was around we couldn't get away with that type of mod as the WWII Wire Chief kept us on our toes and would only allow that as a temporary fix to get you home where you could do a proper soldered in splice that would be guaranteed to last for years.

    What does the voltage drop to at the switch and at the battery when the passing lights are on and then with the extra draw of the cooling fan when it turns on?
    Clip is actually jammed in pretty tight, had to use pliers to get it in. What I also did is separate the "U" so its not flat. I wanted to solder it but I realized it isnt necessary. Its pretty tight and highly doubt it will ever come out.

    As far as voltage drop there was none, I only took note of it with both lights on but nor the signal or the cooling fan was on. I had this for about 2 weeks and only run dual in the night, no problems at all so far.

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    Quote Originally Posted by krisnet View Post
    Clip is actually jammed in pretty tight, had to use pliers to get it in. What I also did is separate the "U" so its not flat. I wanted to solder it but I realized it isnt necessary. Its pretty tight and highly doubt it will ever come out.

    As far as voltage drop there was none, I only took note of it with both lights on but nor the signal or the cooling fan was on. I had this for about 2 weeks and only run dual in the night, no problems at all so far.
    Done similar to this many times over the past 50 years when Dad was not looking and most often you won't see signs of failure for some months to a year or so. Some times you may get away with it on low draw items but with a high current draw your chances are quite a bit reduced.

    Dad before he became a Wire Chief got his masters degree in electrical engineering from MIT class of 1927. It didn't take us much time to learn that when he advised us about electricity and wire connections that he was always giving us the best advice.

    In critical applications where a wire might come under tension I still find myself doing as Dad taught us and make a Western Union or Field splice instead of using crimp connectors or wire nuts. A Field splice is when you strip back enough bare wire so you can make a square knot so even if the wire is put under tension the splice will only get tighter. Dad would make us solder the square knot afterwards to make it more secure. Then came covering the splice up with a butyl rubber wrap using rubber cement to seal it and then electrical tape to protect the rubber from the sun etc. Relatives occasionally show me work Dad did for their fathers or even grandfathers 80 years ago that is still holding fine.

    See:
    http://www.hardscrabblefarm.com/ww2/...ire_splice.htm

    I still have Dad's TE-33 Kit.

    Anyway if this mod fails over time it should only be an inconvenience as you should only loose the running of the low beam when you have the switch set to high beam and the normal functions of the switch should still be working fine.
    Last edited by Rockynv; 10-29-2011 at 11:17 PM.

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    apriliaforum expert Buckeroo Bob's Avatar
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    Great story and a wonderful tip. I think I'll try that even though I rarely ride at night. Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockynv View Post
    Done similar to this many times over the past 50 years when Dad was not looking and most often you won't see signs of failure for some months to a year or so. Some times you may get away with it on low draw items but with a high current draw your chances are quite a bit reduced.

    Dad before he became a Wire Chief got his masters degree in electrical engineering from MIT class of 1927. It didn't take us much time to learn that when he advised us about electricity and wire connections that he was always giving us the best advice.

    In critical applications where a wire might come under tension I still find myself doing as Dad taught us and make a Western Union or Field splice instead of using crimp connectors or wire nuts. A Field splice is when you strip back enough bare wire so you can make a square knot so even if the wire is put under tension the splice will only get tighter. Dad would make us solder the square knot afterwards to make it more secure. Then came covering the splice up with a butyl rubber wrap using rubber cement to seal it and then electrical tape to protect the rubber from the sun etc. Relatives occasionally show me work Dad did for their fathers or even grandfathers 80 years ago that is still holding fine.

    See:
    http://www.hardscrabblefarm.com/ww2/...ire_splice.htm

    I still have Dad's TE-33 Kit.

    Anyway if this mod fails over time it should only be an inconvenience as you should only loose the running of the low beam when you have the switch set to high beam and the normal functions of the switch should still be working fine.
    Yeah man but we are talking about some scooter headlights and a simple job to connect 2 wires together, not WW2 equipment, its pretty much like a fuse. If ur going to be that anal about it you will end up rewiring ur whole scooter. Its not rocket science or a life or death situation. I would use those knots in an application such as wiring a house, airplane, medical equipment or even an area thats a pain in the ass to reach to do the job again. And if it does come out after a year or so all I got to do is unscrew 2 screws and put another clip.

    I guess in one way or another we all have or own little issues. Ur anal about wiring and im anal about my socks

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    Quote Originally Posted by krisnet View Post
    Yeah man but we are talking about some scooter headlights and a simple job to connect 2 wires together, not WW2 equipment, its pretty much like a fuse. If ur going to be that anal about it you will end up rewiring ur whole scooter. Its not rocket science or a life or death situation. I would use those knots in an application such as wiring a house, airplane, medical equipment or even an area thats a pain in the ass to reach to do the job again. And if it does come out after a year or so all I got to do is unscrew 2 screws and put another clip.

    I guess in one way or another we all have or own little issues. Ur anal about wiring and im anal about my socks
    We are to a degree victims of our parents. I just hate having to redo a job from taking a shortcut thats not really kosher. When the slip clip fails you may find the switch connector compromised and in need of replacing also. I can't count the number of automotive fuse blocks I have had to fix or bypass for friends who did the slip clip to tap in to them. As the clips fail resistance at the connection builds which translates into heat which then can do some real damage.

    You might get away with this long term with some low draw LED's and such however the headlights on the Sport City are 55 watts each so we are bridging almost 10 amps with the clip.

    If we dig deeper looking at the circuit itself and do the math things don't look that great either. Fuse No5 is 15 amps and protects the headlights, running lights, stop light, turn signals, instrument cluster and horn. When you add up the load on the circuit with the passing lights on which comes to between 14 to 15 amps, if you hit the brakes and the horn at the same time you could end up blowing the fuse as you could be close to 18 amps or greater draw on a 15 amp circuit. Maybe 17.5 amps or possibly 18.5 depending on whether the Sport City has a 20, 25 or 30 watt horn and assuming that the instrument cluster and it LED lighting only draws 10 watts or less. The likelyhood of failure increases the longer you run the bike with the clip in place to run the passing lights instead of just the single high beam. You would probably have to go through the bike and convert the running lights, stop and turn signals to LED to lighten up the load to make running the passing lights in place of just the high beam advisable.

    It looks like the circuit loading factored in that you have to take your thumb off the passing light button to hit the horn so it dose not seem like it was designed with the capacity to hold the load of both. Personally I only like to see a 12 or 13 amp max load on a 15 amp fuse and prefer a 10 amp or less normal running load.

    On further thought if we also consider that loading Fuse No5 to max puts about a 200 watt or greater load on a 320 watt system, that only leaves about 120 watts or less to run the fuel pump, ecm, fuel injector, ignition, etc.

    For long term reliability of the bike I would now after considering the electrical loads say it is not a good idea to bridge the passing lights to the high beams without reducing the load on Fuse No5 first especially if you do any night driving where you would use the high beams. I usually run my vehicles for 10 to 20 years or longer so I usually keep this goal in mind when adding loads to the electrical system.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockynv View Post
    We are to a degree victims of our parents. I just hate having to redo a job from taking a shortcut thats not really kosher. When the slip clip fails you may find the switch connector compromised and in need of replacing also. I can't count the number of automotive fuse blocks I have had to fix or bypass for friends who did the slip clip to tap in to them. As the clips fail resistance at the connection builds which translates into heat which then can do some real damage.

    You might get away with this long term with some low draw LED's and such however the headlights on the Sport City are 55 watts each so we are bridging almost 10 amps with the clip.

    If we dig deeper looking at the circuit itself and do the math things don't look that great either. Fuse No5 is 15 amps and protects the headlights, running lights, stop light, turn signals, instrument cluster and horn. When you add up the load on the circuit with the passing lights on which comes to between 14 to 15 amps, if you hit the brakes and the horn at the same time you could end up blowing the fuse as you could be close to 18 amps or greater draw on a 15 amp circuit. Maybe 17.5 amps or possibly 18.5 depending on whether the Sport City has a 20, 25 or 30 watt horn and assuming that the instrument cluster and it LED lighting only draws 10 watts or less. The likelyhood of failure increases the longer you run the bike with the clip in place to run the passing lights instead of just the single high beam. You would probably have to go through the bike and convert the running lights, stop and turn signals to LED to lighten up the load to make running the passing lights in place of just the high beam advisable.

    It looks like the circuit loading factored in that you have to take your thumb off the passing light button to hit the horn so it dose not seem like it was designed with the capacity to hold the load of both. Personally I only like to see a 12 or 13 amp max load on a 15 amp fuse and prefer a 10 amp or less normal running load.

    On further thought if we also consider that loading Fuse No5 to max puts about a 200 watt or greater load on a 320 watt system, that only leaves about 120 watts or less to run the fuel pump, ecm, fuel injector, ignition, etc.

    For long term reliability of the bike I would now after considering the electrical loads say it is not a good idea to bridge the passing lights to the high beams without reducing the load on Fuse No5 first especially if you do any night driving where you would use the high beams. I usually run my vehicles for 10 to 20 years or longer so I usually keep this goal in mind when adding loads to the electrical system.
    ok.......

  9. #9
    apriliaforum expert Buckeroo Bob's Avatar
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    Ha. Maybe I'll leave things just the way they are. Thanks Professor Rocky. Electrics have ALWAYS been my weak point. Wish you were closer to help me finish up a motorcycle restoration project which languishes in need of wiring. :-(

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    apriliaforum expert scooterman's Avatar
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    Well now that that's settled, would a dual light HID conversion be the preferred way to go?


    '09 SC 250
    V4 Malossi Head & Cylinder (ported & polished ; j )
    203cc Injector (Scarabeo 500)
    Akrapovic slip-on
    12g sliders w/ stiff clutch & contrast springs
    Michelin Power Pure

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    Quote Originally Posted by scooterman View Post
    Well now that that's settled, would a dual light HID conversion be the preferred way to go?
    I doubt it would have a problem either way. What might happen is there wont be enough juice to power up the HID's initially so a direct connection via the battery might be necessary. <<<< This is what I had to do on my cousins SR50. On the other hand on my R1 I had 4 HID'S hi/lo beams, an alarm, angel eyes, and a power commander and never experienced a problem for over 3 years.
    If all this would be an issue I would assume that with all the additional stuff (horns, bazzaz, pc3, pc5, GPS, radios, ETC) people put on their bikes they would always be having issues. I myself have installed a couple of PC3, PC5 and Bazzaz units (all fuel controllers) and on the instructions it says to get the current from the tail light, and no problems with fuses or what not.
    Now if your planning on keeping ur scooter for 10-20 years as Rocky says maybe his method is a better choice....

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    apriliaforum expert scooterman's Avatar
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    Yes, double HID hi/lo sounds good. Mr. Rocky, do you see that as a possibility on the SC?


    '09 SC 250
    V4 Malossi Head & Cylinder (ported & polished ; j )
    203cc Injector (Scarabeo 500)
    Akrapovic slip-on
    12g sliders w/ stiff clutch & contrast springs
    Michelin Power Pure

  13. #13
    apriliaforum expert Buckeroo Bob's Avatar
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    That's "Professor" Rocky to me and you!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckeroo Bob View Post
    That's "Professor" Rocky to me and you!
    My only professor is Benjamin and VR. Been working long enough on bikes to realize that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scooterman View Post
    Yes, double HID hi/lo sounds good. Mr. Rocky, do you see that as a possibility on the SC?
    It sounds good until you look at the cost. The headlights on the Sport City are already pretty good so to me HID while enticing, being cutting edge, are not worth that much to me at this time.

    To maintain the design load on fuse no 5 my inclination would be to put in a 10 amp sealed automotive relay behind the lamp housing wiring the coils to the power lead going to the high beam and then drop a 7 amp fused lead directly to the battery to power the lights switched by the relay. Jump the passing light and high beam leads at the switch and then fuse no5 will still be pulling a very little more than its design load on low or high beam and you are taking no chances with stressing the circuit. The only potential problem would be how close this would put the constant load on the generator to its published maximum output of 320 watts.

    The chart below shows the basic loads you have to deal with on fuse no 5. You don't need a Phd to know that you don't try to pull over 200 watts from a 180 watt circuit without eventually paying a penalty for it. Price out the regulator, rectifier and generator/stator for the bike and see if you want to risk that type of cash.

    Item Watts Volts Amps
    High Beam 55 12 4.583333333
    Low Beam 55 12 4.583333333
    Parking Lamp 05 12 0.416666667
    Turn Signal Font 10 12 0.833333333
    Turn Signal Rear 10 12 0.833333333
    Tail Light 05 12 0.416666667
    Stop Light 22 12 1.833333333
    License Plate Light 05 12 0.416666667
    Instrument Cluster 10 12 0.833333333
    Horn 25 12 2.083333333

    Totals 202 16.83333333

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