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Thread: Stebel Nautilus how-to (with pictures)

  1. #1
    apriliaforum Junkie vinylengraver's Avatar
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    Stebel Nautilus how-to (with pictures)

    Boys and Girls,
    I've been hanging around this site for long enough to start feeling guilty about finally getting something back to the community.
    So here is my contribution: a detailed description of my Stebel nautilus horn install (with pictures)

    Stebel Nautilus is a compact air-horn with a claimed loudness of 139dB. When you read a fine print on the box, you will find out that the 139dB value is measured at 4 inches away from the horn's "mouth". I dare you to try if it's true... you'd be deaf if you did. From a more convincing distance of 6ft, the horn is rated at 115dB (If I remember correctly) which is a little bit less impressive, but stil VERY, VERY loud.

    Comparing the Stebel to the stock horn is quite revealing. In fact I have opted not to remove or disconnect the stock horn while installing the Stebel. There were two reasons for that: firstly even though the Stebel has virtually no audible "delay", due to the way I installed it and do to it's "air-horn" nature it is actually a tiny bit "slower" than the stock horn.
    So, you can easily compare the "before" and "after effect by lightly tapping on the horn button and /or pressing and holding it all the way. The weak annoying, stock "meep, meep" is instantly flooded by a blast of dual-tone air-horn goodness - ear-piercing and sure to keep cagers on their toes.

    The second benefit of dual-horn setup is that it lets you modulate the output. For example: If you are in front of your girlfriend's house and you just want to let her know you're there and waiting, gently tap the button - the usual lame "meep-meep" will sound. After you've waited for 20 more minutes and you're starting to realize you gonna be late for the movie, press the button all the way. By then she'll know you guys are late for sure. And so will all the neighbors.

    Another possible scenario may include a situation where it's necessary to differentiate from a friendly: "come on, move on, just a little bit more...I need to turn right and you're in my way" to "get the fuck out of my way you retard and watch where you're going next time!!!"

    OK, after spending a fair bit of time trying to figure out the best way to do this and after looking at other people's pictorials and instructions I decided that due to the limited space available under the fairings on our scoot I will need to split the horn to allow for better flexibility. In other words, I couldn't find a good place to install it the way it is "out of the box"
    Here is how it looks like after taking apart the compressor and the horn "halves". It is easily done, there are couple of clips that hold it together, it is not fastened in any other way.

    Compressor:



    Horn:



    Once the compressor is separated from the horn they need to be connected together using some sort of tube - I used a flexible clear hose from a hardware store. It has been secured on both ends by hose clamps, same as the ones used on the air-lines.

    The horn "module" ends-up with a hole after separation, so there needs to be some adapter/connector fitted in place- I used a heater hose plastic connector form an automotive supply store. It is firmly pushed in place and glued using a pvc glue (used for plumbing jobs). Some fitting and finishing with fine sandpaper was necessary, also the clips that earlier secured the two pieces together were "shaven" using a cutting disc on my Dremel.
    __________________________________________________ __________

    Sidenote: Dremel is indispensable for this and any other similar job. You can do without, but it is much easer if you got one. If you enjoy tweaking and fixing things, go get a Dremel tool NOW!
    __________________________________________________ __________

    The Horn piece was left with some extra plastic after the compressor was removed, so that was promptly cut-of using.. you guessed it!... a Dremel!
    I also drilled four holes at the corners of the remaining "bracket" - they are later used to fasten the horn to the mounting surface with some zipties.

    The compressor part is fairly heavy and it vibrates when working, so it needs a bracket. There is a factory supplied hole to mount it using a supplied screw, but I couldn't find any place where to use the suggested setup. So I made a strap out of some aluminium, drilled a hole and affixed the compressor part to the existing ECU bracket using the existing screw. It is positioned at the left side, behind the legshield and it is tucked nicely just at the foot rest level.
    Here is how it looks:



    The clear hose is looped behind and under it - you will see how its attached to the horn part soon...
    The horn part is actually pretty light and it doesn't need nearly as much bracing to stay put. I decided to mount it on the inside of the legshield, on the left hand side, above the compressor using zipties and ziptie "bases" that are supplied with two-sided VERY sticky tape. Once the inside of the legshield is cleaned with alcohol, the plastic bases and zipties secure the horn to the surface.

    To prep the spot I placed some rubber foam tape on both ends where the horn rests against the legshield and used some high density foam in the middle to make the whole thing stable.
    Here is how it looks before the horn is attached:



    Here is a close-up of the horn attached with zipties:



    And here is the placement on the inside of the legshield:



    Finally, both pieces connected with the hose, before the legshield panel is up and mounted:



    Once the "mechanical" install was finished, there was some electrical connections to be done. The kit I got came with all the wiring needed, including the fuse/fuse holder and the relay was included too.

    There is a clear wiring diagram printed on the horn box and the wiring is pretty generic, so as long as you follow the directions you'll be fine. Couple of things: the diagram suggests that the horn button runs on the negative/ground line. In case of our scoot the button interrupts the positive/hot wire. That makes no difference in the way the diagram is followed though. Also, I decided to retain the original horn, so instead of cutting both negative and positive connectors I soldered a "new" positive connection to the existing "hot" gray wire and attached the ground wire straight to ground (actually I used the negative terminal on the battery)

    Grey "positive" wire off the stock horn:




    Here is the "piggybacked" new wire:



    And here it is with the handsome black cap supplied with the original horn:



    The relay can be mounted on the other side of the centre column, using the other screw of the ECU bracket. There is ample space in there and its easy to route all the cables neatly, including the ones that need to be connected directly to the battery.


    ________________________________________

    Sidenote: Do not try to skip the relay and use only the existing wiring. The new horn draws 20AMP of power and when I press the button light dim and the voltage drops from 14.3 to just over 12. Should you "forget" the relay your button and a better part of wiring will smoke and you'll likely do lots of damage. Please also make sure that the fuse is there and it reads 20AMP.
    I placed it such that it is easily accessible from behind the little VIN trap-door in the centre of the legshield, just below the hook.

    ________________________________________

    This is where you could test it, make sure it all works, put the legshield fairing on and be done with it.

    However, I figured that once I had it all apart I can do one more tweak, which is to make an opening where the horn's mouth was facing the front fender "liner". I suspect that the Stebel is loud enough to be OK without such opening, but I was too tempted not to try this.
    Using an old cheap computer speaker box I have fabricated a cute little plastic grille to be used as the cover for the horn opening. To mount is I used a "gasket" cut out of the two sided sticky tape - I got plenty leftover after mounting my helmet anti-fog lense:


    Then I traced the "gasket on the "fender" fairing with a silver sharpie (at the point where the horn would face after mounted:



    Cut it out with my trusty Dremel:



    After finishing the rough edges a bit, affix the double-side "gasket":



    And finally attach the "grille" to the sticky "gasket". BTW, this stuff is VERY sticky. If you clean the surface with some alcohol and try to do a clean job, it will stay put FOREVER. Finished product from the inside:



    And from the outside:


    When the horn blasts, the sound is amplified by the front wheel fender cavity and it projects it forward. Resonating properties of the scooters body help too, so this sucker is VERY, VERY LOUD!

    So this is it. It took me a good part of the day today, but trying to take decent pictures and doing things in particular order for this reason takes a bit of extra time, actually.
    I found this to be a fun and easy install, but I had all the tools and supplies and I planned ahead.
    ____________________________________

    Last Sidenote:
    Be very, very careful with metal clips using for fastening the panels together with the screws.
    Few of them fell out during the job (including when I was putting everything together) and it took me ages fishing them out from the scooter's belly. I would suggest that you remove all the clips before it's too late and tighten them before re-attaching. You'll save yourself lots of grief!

    ____________________________________

    At the end of the job I got one extra screw left (?!) and lost one of the clips. The hook in the centre of the legshield fairing is now held with a single screw instead of two... I need to go see my dealer, maybe they can spare me one...
    BTW, the centre hook needs to be removed to detach the panel - there is a single hex-head screw holding it all in the centre, covered by the hook.

    Here is the one last picture - it shows the horn tucked nicely behind the legshield, as seen peeking through the VIN trap-door:



    OK, that's all. I hope you find it useful and Muchacho - maybe this can be used as a sticky.

    Drive safe and let yourself be HEARD with your new Stebel Nautilus horn.

    U P D A T E :
    After riding the scoot in fairly heavy rain I came to a conclusion that the horn "grill" opening was not a good idea. There is really not that much water getting in, but I'm concerned with the amount of mud/sand/fine gravel and other debris that makes it way into the opening.
    Therefore I advise not to follow my example and leave the fender enclosed. If you decide to follow my installation procedure, please skip the "grill" part.
    I will be covering the hole shortly.

    Kris
    Last edited by vinylengraver; 02-12-2008 at 01:32 PM.

  2. #2
    apriliaforum expert muchacho's Avatar
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    Awesome... quite a good read too.

  3. #3
    apriliaforum expert TiminIndy's Avatar
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    Nice tutorial. I've considered getting one of those, or at least buying a regular motorcycle horn to replace the stock one--from a motorcycle that's known to have a loud horn.

    So with that set up, won't you have to disconnect the air hoses every time you want to remove the leg shield?

    Do you think that grill is gonna let a bunch of water into the front cavity that holds the ECU and a lot of the electrical components of the scoot?

  4. #4
    apriliaforum Junkie vinylengraver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiminIndy View Post
    Nice tutorial. I've considered getting one of those, or at least buying a regular motorcycle horn to replace the stock one--from a motorcycle that's known to have a loud horn.

    So with that set up, won't you have to disconnect the air hoses every time you want to remove the leg shield?

    Do you think that grill is gonna let a bunch of water into the front cavity that holds the ECU and a lot of the electrical components of the scoot?
    I got the grille idea from the Atlantis - it has a similar opening behind the wheel stock - someone on the 500 forum has a how-to and they have this picture;

    I don't think there will be much water getting in at all - the opening is high up, and there is a generous mudguard over the wheel.
    There is nothing really on that side of the scoot to get wet, except for the horn now...but lots of people have mounted the Stebel outside on the motorbike frame where it's exposed to water and other elements at all times.

    Note all the wiring and components in front of the back wheel and all this stuff is drenched every time it rains. ECU is actually out of the way, shielded by the centre column. A bit of moisture won't hurt, unless the scoot gets submerged, in which case there are enough cavities and openings there as is to do damage...

    Regarding the air hose- the panel cannot be easily removed anyway. There is the under-seat storage lock cable there that keeps it attached. You can still take the panel off and put it aside for servicing, just not remove completely - should you have to, it's one more screw to undo.
    Kris

  5. #5
    apriliaforum expert TiminIndy's Avatar
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    I haven't taken mine apart yet, but I figured there probably wasn't a better place to mount it since you put it there. I need to take it apart soon to install my Gorilla alarm that's been sitting on my work bench since I bought it.

  6. #6
    apriliaforum expert Switchbak's Avatar
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    Vinyl,
    Excellent work and thank you.

  7. #7
    apriliaforum Junkie vinylengraver's Avatar
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    You're welcome.
    I already got to use it this morning.
    Now that I'm no longer embarrassed to press the horn button I think I will use it more often
    Kris

  8. #8
    apriliaforum expert muchacho's Avatar
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    is it possible to get instant response with this horn when you are in traffic?

  9. #9
    apriliaforum Junkie vinylengraver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by muchacho View Post
    is it possible to get instant response with this horn when you are in traffic?
    That's the idea.
    The Nautilus has all that's needed and more. Still, some people will remain oblivious to their surroundings no matter what.
    It is safe to say however, that your chances of getting noticed increase several-fold over the stock "beeper".
    Kris

  10. #10
    apriliaforum expert extrashot's Avatar
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    Just wired mine up... HOLY CRAP THAT THING IS LOUD!!!!! Now I can really mess with the cell phone yakkers who don't see me...

    Did a nice clean install - took pics of course, but it will be a little while before I can post them. I grounded it to the battery which was key to getting it to work... tried several other spots with no success. Thanks for the write up - that helped!
    Black '03 SR70 DiTech GP-1 (Morini)
    Malossi Mods: 70cc/ECU/Upped gears/Special belt/Red filter/Red contra/7.1 rollers/Delta clutch/MHR sintered pads
    Other Mods:Leo Vince ZX/Aprilia adj shock/NGK ZMR7AP plug/Lockhart-Philips flush rear sigs/CRG lane-split mirrors/Shaved tail/Pillion pegs/139db Stebel Nautilus horn/Boyeson 712 dual-stage glass reeds/Snorkel mod/Aprilia-Ergal 7075 blue fasteners/Keisler reed valve spacer/Stage6 240mm front rotor //Next tinkers: Galfer SS braided lines, Galfer rear rotor / Pirelli Diablo 150/70-13 (r), Pir. SL-26 (fr) / Malossi torsion ring / hole-y shiny clutch bell / HG fuel reg / always more

  11. #11
    apriliaforum Junkie vinylengraver's Avatar
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    U P D A T E :
    After riding the scoot in fairly heavy rain I came to a conclusion that the horn "grill" opening was not a good idea. There is really not that much water getting in, but I'm concerned with the amount of mud/sand/fine gravel and other debris that makes it way into the opening.
    Therefore I advise not to follow my example and leave the fender enclosed. If you decide to follow my installation procedure, please skip the "grill" part.
    I will be covering the hole shortly.
    Otherwise the horn works awesome.
    Kris

  12. #12
    apriliaforum Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by vinylengraver View Post
    U P D A T E :
    After riding the scoot in fairly heavy rain I came to a conclusion that the horn "grill" opening was not a good idea. There is really not that much water getting in, but I'm concerned with the amount of mud/sand/fine gravel and other debris that makes it way into the opening.
    When I saw the initial post... that was my 1st thought, but I didn't want to rain on your parade.

    Nice documentation though - thumbs up on the final results!


    2002 SR50 DiTech --> SOLD 7/15/08
    - Malossi parts: 70cc BBK, ECU, VL12 reed cage, 6.5g rollers, red air filter
    - Avon Viper Stryke AM63 tires (130 front...140 rear)
    - Gearing (Stage6 16/49 prim...Polini 20/61 sec)
    - Agip fluids (City 2T engine...75W-90 gear)
    - DIY moisture trap w/ remote drain
    - Leo Vince ZX exhaust
    - Polini kevlar belt
    - Stebel air horn
    - TT RPM meter
    - Side stand

  13. #13
    apriliaforum Junkie vinylengraver's Avatar
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    UPDATE NUMBER TWO:
    On my way from work today, going downhill around 50km/h I suddenly saw a white nissan maxima peeking its nose out of the (somewhat) hidden driveway.
    I had an instantaneous gut feeling that this car will be right in front of me in a matter of milliseconds. I just knew that. I squeezed both brakes and my new horn all at once, trying to keep the scoot form skidding. It was fairly dry, but the road there is bumpy and the ride is very rough affecting traction quite badly...

    The tail of the scoot trailed nice and straight, but the distance was way too short, so I needed to let go and try to avoid the impact by swerving to the left... really, really close to the median... Subconsciously I was still squeezing the horn button and finally the car squealed and stopped half way leaving just enough room for me to get by without incident, barely brushing the edge of my riding boot against his front bumper. It all took maybe half a second, but you know how shit like that slowly unfolds right in front of your eyes just like in a slo-mo movie... nnnnoooooo.....

    I saw the guy's face when I drove right by his window and he was scared.
    He looked fuckin' pertified.
    Young punk, driving a fast car bought with his parents' money...
    Hope he looks both ways next time.

    Strange thing is, I was calm and focused at all time. I'm quite certain that it was my new Stebel Nautilus horn that saved me from major injury.
    That and my superior skill, of course.
    You should go and get one right now (a horn that is. But then again, good skill wouldn't hurt either).
    You will not be sorry, and chances are you will be thankful. Seriously thankful.
    Kris

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