• RSV4 valve adjustment w/motor in the chassis

    This is not intended to be a step by step how to V4 valve adj procedure, just some observations that may help others.

    Iíve checked and adj the valves on a few customers RSV4s, but until yesterday Iíve not had to adj the front bank, only the rear.

    This latest bike was a shocker, with only 2,900 miles, 9 out of the 16 valves were out of specs towards the loose side.
    Some were .05 - .10mm beyond the specs but one IN valve on #2 cyl was at .65mm clearance, that's 1/2mm beyond tolerance

    This was the first V4 motor that I had to remove all four cams to adj everything back to specs.
    I found out that the Aprilia supplied cam timing/alignment tools were not designed to fit on the front bank of cylinders with the motor mounted in the chassis.
    Bellow are photos of the modifications I had to make in order to fit the alignment tools on the front bank of cylinders.

    This latest bike was also the first valve adj Iíve performed on an APRC motor, there is one important step not mentioned in the service manual.

    The early motors had one-piece EX cam gears, while the later motors use a spring loaded two piece gear designed to reduce gear lash noise, same as used on Shiver motors.

    Basically, the new two piece EX cam gears are sandwiched together with three springs between them, the springs apply pressure that cause the EX cam gears to rotate against each other.
    This preloads the gear teeth to eliminate any play where the IN and EX cams mesh together, thus reducing noise.

    What is not mentioned in the service manual is that before removing the EX cam you should insert a 6mm pin to lock the EX gear halves in position, thus preventing the springs from forcing them apart.

    Though not completely necessary, inserting the lock pin makes it a lot easier when re-assembling the cams and aligning up the timing marks.

    One last thing I found out is that having three of each size valve shim is not enough.
    For this motor I needed four 2.70mm shims and I had to run down to my local KTM dealer and buy that fourth shim.

    Photos showing cam gear holding tool modified/ground down to fit on front cyl bank, crank locking pin modified to fit on LH side without removing flywheel and cam gear alignment pin bent to clear frame rail on frt bank.

    I've attached a valve log sheet (my wife made it for me) that I use to take notes and write down the clearance values with the shim sizes I used.
    Print it and record your adjustments so you can compare them to the next valve adj in 12k miles.

    RSV4 Valve adj log.pdf

    This article was originally published in forum thread: FYI: RSV4 valve adj w/motor in the chassis started by amauri View original post
    Comments 62 Comments
    1. mrmike_14's Avatar
      mrmike_14 -
      Thank you for the answer, Mike! I think you are right.
    1. Diablo1's Avatar
      Diablo1 -
      Getting ready to buy tools for valve adjustment for 2016 Tuono 1100. I've read the Factory Service Manual and all the threads, and believe I understand the procedure. A few questions remain. I assume I have the Kokusan flywheel on my bike and will need the flywheel puller (020913Y) and the flywheel holding tool (020914Y), to remove the flywheel to install the crank timing pin tool. The Service Manual states that you can't use the crank timing pin to hold the crankshaft, that you have to use the primary gear lock tool (020850Y). You have to remove the clutch to install the primary gear lock tool. Is this really needed? Can you loosen and tighten the cam gear retaining bolts while just using the crank timing pin tool to hold the crank in position? Or will this method damage the crank timing pin?
    1. Kalif's Avatar
      Kalif -
      Hi everyone
      just wanted to share
      today recieved a call from a friend
      he made valve check on aprilia rsv4 factory 11,000km (6500miles)
      and all valves were in the right spec

      the most interesting is the fact i was riding that bike during break in period (first 600) miles
      and i wiuld hardly follow the instructions in the manual not to exceed 7000 rpm

      i was riding it few times on speed more that 140 miles
      then the bike was sold and after me the owner was doing race track days

      so to those who had bad experience with the valves i just wanted to say that you never know what to expect

      ps:the only oil that was used factory line 300v
      the owner compains about evaporation of the oil
      like 200ml for 1500 km
      but i always heard that its a common thing for the 300v and they have that kind of thing in common

      i was having the same issue on my 2012 aprc
    1. plocky's Avatar
      plocky -
      Some supplemental info for anyone buying tools & parts for this job.

      1: The camshaft gear holder PN;028065Y is superseded to new part number: 020956Y
      http://www.af1racing.com/store/Scrip...dproduct=17381
      This updated version looks a lot slimmer; so possibly may not need adjustment (grinding) to fit front cyl bank in frame.


      2:
      2-) 897443 v/c gasket
      6-) 898410 bolt gasket
      4-) 857074 plug hole to cover gasket
      4-) 857043 cam tower o-ring

      The group of gaskets & O-rings above comes as a kit; Valve Cover Gasket Kit for RSV4 & Tuono V4 (AF1-897443)
      http://www.af1racing.com/store/Scrip...dproduct=74038
      The kit is the same price as buying the individual items, just saves time in listing the quantities & PN of each item.

      3: There is now a gasket for the Alternator/stator cover for 09-16 RSV4 as an alternative to the Aprilia Corse part number COMK060597.
      Stator Cover Gasket - 09-16 RSV4 & 11-16 Tuono V4 (AF1-GS898414)
      http://www.af1racing.com/store/Scrip...dproduct=74226

      4: The replacement camshaft gear securing bolts can be found by searching the following Part number: 857008 - Should be same bolts for all models, however check the Parts Guide PDF for your model before ordering.
      http://www.af1racing.com/store/Scrip...dproduct=16418


      All these parts are available at AF1 online shop. The parts guide PDF for individual models, with pics & part numbers is free to view or download.
      http://www.af1racing.com/store/Scrip...dCategory=2993

      Hope this saves someone some time as it took me a while to find all these bits.

      Thanks to amauri for putting the original posts & thread together.
      Thanks to Mrs amauri for the Valve adjustment log.
    1. fostytou's Avatar
      fostytou -
      Quote Originally Posted by plocky View Post
      Hope this saves someone some time as it took me a while to find all these bits.

      Thanks to amauri for putting the original posts & thread together.
      Thanks to Mrs amauri for the Valve adjustment log.
      Just an FYI - if anyone needs any supplemental info I have a really comprehensive document compiled here that includes part numbers, tools required, adjustment procedure, and tips.
      http://www.apriliaforum.com/forums/s...ed-Walkthrough

      But yes, big thanks to amauri for getting the ball rolling for me and many of the rest of us.
    1. amauri's Avatar
      amauri -
      ------UPDATE--------

      Looks like Aprilia re-positioned the LH side screw hole for the crankshaft timing pin.
      They moved it away from the flywheel just far enough so that removing the Kokusan type flywheel is no longer necessary like it was with previous engines.

      I started seeing this a few months ago while servicing and adjusting valves on some of the newest serial number engines.

      So make sure you ck before you remove the flywheel needlessly.
    1. Diablo1's Avatar
      Diablo1 -
      Quote Originally Posted by amauri View Post
      ------UPDATE--------

      Looks like Aprilia re-positioned the LH side screw hole for the crankshaft timing pin.
      They moved it away from the flywheel just far enough so that removing the Kokusan type flywheel is no longer necessary like it was with previous engines.

      I started seeing this a few months ago while servicing and adjusting valves on some of the newest serial number engines.

      So make sure you ck before you remove the flywheel needlessly.
      Is this change for 2016 model year in the US? Tuono 1100, or does it go back to any of the Tuono 1000 V4s? Would you have a serial# for an engine with the update, so we can figure if our engine was likely updated?
    1. DarK_SpY's Avatar
      DarK_SpY -
      Quote Originally Posted by amauri View Post
      ------UPDATE--------

      Looks like Aprilia re-positioned the LH side screw hole for the crankshaft timing pin.
      They moved it away from the flywheel just far enough so that removing the Kokusan type flywheel is no longer necessary like it was with previous engines.

      I started seeing this a few months ago while servicing and adjusting valves on some of the newest serial number engines.

      So make sure you ck before you remove the flywheel needlessly.
      do you know what are newest serial number engines? i would be happy if i can avoid buying extra tools i won't need for the valve job.
      thanks
    1. amauri's Avatar
      amauri -
      I don't know when this change was made, and to my knowledge Aprilia has not provided a list of serial numbers.

      I've asked Aprilia's Tech dept here in the USA to see if Italy can provide the engine serial numbers where the change began.
    1. DarK_SpY's Avatar
      DarK_SpY -
      i can confirm that tuono factory 2016 engine #3374 doesn't need removal of the flywheel for the crankshaft timing pin
    1. Gabro's Avatar
      Gabro -
      i just lathe shave the flywheel flat on any bike i work on... so it's removal is needed only at first time, timing pin will fit.

      anyway, that movement of the pin position on lastest motor is a good thing
    1. dastrups's Avatar
      dastrups -
      Hey Amauri,
      Is it necessary to buy two of each tool? I know some need modification but I am wondering if you can use the modified version on both front and rear.
    1. amauri's Avatar
      amauri -
      no need for two tools
      and also no need to modify the tool, as of 2013 Aprilia saw the light and re-designed the tool to fit with engine in chassis
    1. RandomTask's Avatar
      RandomTask -
      Yep, I bought mine from AF1 and no modification needed - fit just fine front and back.


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1. BillRV10's Avatar
      BillRV10 -
      Quote Originally Posted by GreaseSnake View Post
      When I havn't got the proper locking tools I use my indicator for the same purpose.
      Attachment 195357

      some brands have rediculous prices on their special tools.
      G Snake, You are of course correct that many special tools are waaaay overpriced. Checking TDC with an indicator however is often difficult on 4 strokes where the spark plug hole is frequently angled. Most 2 cycles, like the photo you included locate the plug at center and parallel to the bore axis making checking TDC easier. I am sure you know this but it is a good thing to mention to keep the newbes from hurting something. Also if they take the engine through a full rotation they need to watch out for the possibility of the valves hitting the extension of the indicator inside the cylinder.
      Bill J
    1. amauri's Avatar
      amauri -
      RSV4 engines are not timed at TDC.

      Of course you can take the time to measure with your indicators and degree wheel before you disassemble, and put everything back as you found it. But that doesn't account for chain stretch and sprocket wear that causes small changes in cam timing.

      The factory tools cost a lot less than dial indicators and degree wheels.
      Aprilia's tools save several hours labor trying to figure out the exact timing positions of the crank and camshafts with dial indicators and degree wheels. Not to mention that Aprilia's tools makes the job relatively fool proof.

      No need to re-invent the wheel here.
    1. dmaxr1's Avatar
      dmaxr1 -
      I have read most if not all the thread on valve adjustment, but I don't remember any mention of assembly lube. Is it a good idea to use assembly lube during reassembly or is the oil residue left over on the parts enough?

      Is there any reason not to user assembly lube?
    1. ZR1000A1's Avatar
      ZR1000A1 -
      Quote Originally Posted by dmaxr1 View Post
      I have read most if not all the thread on valve adjustment, but I don't remember any mention of assembly lube. Is it a good idea to use assembly lube during reassembly or is the oil residue left over on the parts enough?

      Is there any reason not to user assembly lube?
      I just lube camshafts with an oil I'm going to put in the engine. I think, as long as it's not completely dry it should be fine.
    1. antarius's Avatar
      antarius -
      Quote Originally Posted by dmaxr1 View Post
      I have read most if not all the thread on valve adjustment, but I don't remember any mention of assembly lube. Is it a good idea to use assembly lube during reassembly or is the oil residue left over on the parts enough?

      Is there any reason not to user assembly lube?
      I can't recall what the manual said, but I absolutely use camshaft specific lubricant during reassembly. Always, on every motor I've ever touched.
    1. wspawn's Avatar
      wspawn -
      Thanks for the info; really appreciated. I'm looking to go ahead and check & adjust the valves (getting error code P0210 and sensors are ok - after only 3500km),

      1) Question on the locking tools. Manual states

      020850Y Primary gear lock
      020914Y Flywheel retainer

      Either one of these can be used "Block crankshaft rotation using one of the specific tools". Is this the case? Does the primary gear lock tool on the clutch side require the clutch / plates to be removed to fit? If so, would the flywheel option be better?

      This on a 2016 RSV4 RR (AU) the FSM don't indicate flywheel removal is necessary and based on what I've read above most likely is true in that respect.

      2) Also the crank and cam timing pins, which of these need to be bent 90 degrees to fit with the motor in the frame? Will it be necessary to get two, bend one and leave the other? I think I will have difficulty bending this myself as I don't have the necessary gear, is there a part available that will work here?

      3) Tightening / torquing cam gear bolts - can these be easily accessed while in frame both front and rear?

      Any help appreciated.

      Cheers