• Correct battery replacement procedure to avoid drain

    Many here have reported dead batteries shortly after replacing with a new one.

    Aprilia has recently released a troubleshooting guide with detailed explanations and fixes for issues that over the years have been reported by the dealers thru warranty claims.

    The following is a copy/paste verbatim from that guide:

    INTRODUCTION:
    The following procedure must be performed when refitting the battery onto a vehicle with the MARELLI instrument panel (identifiable by the + and - buttons to the left of the display). This procedure is necessary to prevent the instrument panel from remaining in the "awaiting memorisation of 2nd key", causing it to consume 20 times more current than normal.
    The problem is caused by the instrument self-resetting and then waiting for a key memorisation procedure (even if it has already been performed), remaining in standby mode with this function still active. The resulting high current consumption will drain the battery completely within 3 or 4 days if the vehicle is not used.



    PROCEDURE:
    After disconnecting the poles of a battery on an RSV 1000 V2 with Marelli instrument panel, after reconnecting, perform a key-on, wait at least 15 seconds without starting the engine then switch the ignition off.

    For more precise testing, connect a multimeter set to current measurement to the battery poles: at key-on, current consumption drops from 45 milliamps to 1-2 milliamps after approximately 15 seconds.
    Obviously, when the multimeter is disconnected, it is as if the battery poles were disconnected again, so the aforementioned procedure must be repeated without the multimeter.
    This article was originally published in forum thread: ****Correct battery replacement procedure. Must read. started by amauri View original post
    Comments 4 Comments
    1. Matt fe2o3's Avatar
      Matt fe2o3 -
      Thank you - I keep forgetting to do that.
    1. Stu_O's Avatar
      Stu_O -
      Quote Originally Posted by Matt fe2o3 View Post
      Thank you - I keep forgetting to do that.
      I'd suggest doing the key on - key off thing. But unless you just need to satisfy your curiosity, forget about the testing instructions - at least the way they're written. You can't connect a multimeter set to read milliamps "to the battery poles" without blowing the meter's internal fuse or worse. You must disconnect the negative battery lead, then attach the multimeter in series - red lead to the negative battery cable, and black lead to the negative battery pole. However, when you turn the key on, the current will not decrease from 45mA. It will increase to whatever is consumed by the lights, ignition, and fuel pump prime - probably more than 10 amps. And that will blow the fuse in most multimeters. IF it doesn't blow the fuse, then you actually would see the lower mA figure after turning off the key. Then remove the multimeter from the circuit, and do the whole reset procedure over again.

      Stu O
    1. Worsedog's Avatar
      Worsedog -
      In reference to Stu's comment about the ammeter fuse blowing, if you want to see the actual current drop you can use a clamp on ammeter so that you don't have to disconnect the battery to insert the standard type. Also clamp ons typically have a much higher measurement range as well.

      Just an FYI.
    1. Stu_O's Avatar
      Stu_O -
      Quote Originally Posted by Worsedog View Post
      In reference to Stu's comment about the ammeter fuse blowing, if you want to see the actual current drop you can use a clamp on ammeter so that you don't have to disconnect the battery to insert the standard type. Also clamp ons typically have a much higher measurement range as well.

      Just an FYI.
      True. Unfortunately, in order to accurately measure current less than 1 amp with an inductive clamp, you need a very high resolution, low range clamp like the Amprobe CT238. They cost close to $300. Most of the 0-30 clamps available don't know the difference between 10 milliamps and 100 milliamps. Although they'll give you a reading, they're wildly inaccurate, especially below 500 milliamps. That's likely why Ape's instructions were to use a multimeter. I ran into this issue while doing some field work on parasitic drain for American Honda and ended up buying the Amprobe unit.

      Stu
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