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futfalc
07-28-2010, 08:29 PM
I came across a good link that describes a lot about Moto Guzzi

http://www.lifeinitaly.com/motorcycle/moto-guzzi.asp

rdbandkab
07-29-2010, 01:41 PM
I like these clips from Wikipedia(of Moto Guzzi):

Technical innovations
3.1 CARC
3.2 First rear swingarm suspension
3.3 First DOHC V8 motorcycle engine
3.4 First motorcycle wind tunnel
3.5 First production automatic motorcycle
3.6 First truck-motorcycle hybrid
3.7 First large wheel scooter

And - around 1955:(of their V8)
The engine and the bike were without precedent: a water-cooled, 500 cc (31 cu in) V-8 motorcycle -- with dual overhead cams and a separate carburetor for each of the eight cylinders. Weighing only 45 kg (99 lb) (overall bike weight 148 kg (330 lb)), its miniaturized components tightly packaged, the engine produced an unprecedented 78 hp (58 kW) at 12000 rpm. The motorcycle proved capable of achieving 172 mph -- 20 years before the speed was reached again in Grand Prix motorcycle racing.

Prilliant03
08-24-2010, 03:39 PM
the engine produced an unprecedented 78 hp (58 kW) at 12000 rpm. The motorcycle proved capable of achieving 172 mph [/B]-- 20 years before the speed was reached again in Grand Prix motorcycle racing.

156 bhp/litre. Road bikes have only been doing this in the last 3-4 years.

Incredible.:worship:

johnpeter
08-24-2010, 05:26 PM
And - around 1955:(of their V8)
The engine and the bike were without precedent: a water-cooled, 500 cc (31 cu in) V-8 motorcycle -- with dual overhead cams and a separate carburetor for each of the eight cylinders. Weighing only 45 kg (99 lb) (overall bike weight 148 kg (330 lb)), its miniaturized components tightly packaged, the engine produced an unprecedented 78 hp (58 kW) at 12000 rpm. The motorcycle proved capable of achieving 172 mph -- 20 years before the speed was reached again in Grand Prix motorcycle racing.

First... I <3 MG.

Odd that the V8 used no water pump but was an unpressurized cooling system that used no thermostat and thermal flow. Strange.

DeBenGuzzi
08-24-2010, 05:52 PM
First... I <3 MG.

Odd that the V8 used no water pump but was an unpressurized cooling system that used no thermostat and thermal flow. Strange.

well it also proved a super unreliable engine that was damn near impossible to work on, the parts were so small and precise it was like a swiss watch compared the ditch pumps they make today. I wish they would make a more simplified small v-8 speed demon similar to the vmax but in more of a guzzi style, that would be epic, they could even detune it and make a cruiser out of it similar to say a valkyrie.

Steve / AF1 Racing
08-25-2010, 09:39 PM
Did anybody else catch the part about how after World War II

"Motorcycles became the main mode of transportation in the country because the progress in technology allowed manufacturers to develop low-powered bikes. Italians loved their lightweight motorcycles and scooters. This mode of transportation got them where they wanted to go at a good rate of speed, they were economical, clean and easy to handle on the curving roads."

I've often wondered why Italians, and many Europeans, have an affinity for small bore road bikes. The theory that the post WWII economic climate created that affinity is fascinating to me, and perhaps the most rational explanation why companies like Moto Guzzi, Ducati (remember they were known for singles before the 70s), MV Agusta, and later Aprilia all invested in 125, 250, and 350 cc racing categories...

flyinlow
08-26-2010, 07:46 AM
The other thing they leave out is in post WWII for the axis country's, money was tight. So it really was about getting the most for the few dollars people had to spend. This is also why cars like the VW bug, Fiat Cinquecento were popular as well. Small cars, small engines, easy to get around and good fuel economy. The Mini was another small car to come out of post WWII for the English. Same reasons, because half of the country was rebuilding after the war, most didn't have alot of money to spend.

jrflanne
08-26-2010, 11:03 AM
We had an affinity for small bore motorcycles here in the states in the 60's. Honda and then later other Japanese manufacturers killed Harley and the Brit bikes. The sport exploded then and 250 and 350cc smokers were kicking big, heavy bikes asses. "You meet the nicest people on a Honda" was a great slogan.

And again I will mention the Vintage Moto Museum in Denver because he could use the support and it is an amazing place. He probably has the most extensive collection of small bikes from the 50's and 60's, especially Italian. Including a Ferrari and Maserati. They even built bikes in the 50's. He has a shitload of small MV's (like over 10) and the cherriest 50cc Honda twin you have ever seen.

rdbandkab
08-26-2010, 12:58 PM
Here's a nice (37-ish) Moto Guzzi Condor. 500 single I think. Dig that crazy flywheel....

abouc
09-08-2010, 06:24 PM
There's quite a bit more on this topic at the Piaggio Group website - http://www.piaggiogroup.com/en/group/brands/moto-guzzi Interesting read.